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Vocabulary by Language #2

For each selected English word, name the language it came from.
Guess the most recent language
For example: If the word went from Latin to French to English, the answer is French
Answer must correspond to the yellow box
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedJanuary 31, 2013
Last updatedJune 10, 2019
Times taken15,879
Rating4.47
4:00
Enter language here:
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Word
Language
Fatwa
Arabic
Kindergarten
German
Sommelier
French
Fjord
Norwegian
Eureka
Greek
Kowtow
Chinese
Lanai
Hawaiian
Word
Language
Yogi
Hindi
Paparazzi
Italian
Haiku
Japanese
Smorgasbord
Swedish
Whiskey
Irish or Scottish Gaelic
Pope
Latin
Samovar
Russian
Word
Language
Kiwi
Maori
Kielbasa
Polish
Kebab
Turkish
Klutz
Yiddish
Sauna
Finnish
Yacht
Dutch
Vigilante
Spanish
+2
level 77
May 28, 2013
I thought I guessed Turkish... I know I guessed Arabic multiple times, and Greek, Hebrew, Aramaic, Persian, Farsi... I know that it's eaten so many different places... according to wikipedia the food is originally Persian but the word is derived from Arabic which borrowed it from Aramaic.
+2
level 72
Aug 9, 2018
Dearborn would've worked.
+4
level 67
May 28, 2013
I guess "smorgasbord" is correct in English. It just irks me so much when people drop the ¨ and ˚.
+4
level 73
May 28, 2013
Why? We don't have accent marks in the English language? I'm the opposite...for example, facade should not be spelled with a cedille under the 'c' and cafe should not have an accent aigu over the 'e' when written in English.
+5
level 82
May 31, 2014
Because they aren't considered accent marks in Swedish, but independent letters. There's a similar difference between a and å as is between c and k from a Swedish person's point of view. (Disregared the fact that one pair is consonants and the other is vowels.) Same goes for Finnish and a couple of other languages as well.
+3
level 62
Jan 7, 2016
@sillie fair enough that they are considered different letters in Swedish, but in English, and thus on a typical English keyboard, we don't have them, so we can't put them in. This is a problem with any cross linguistic writing. For example isiNdebele/Xhosa/Zulu have clicks, so how does one write that in Latin characters? Arabic and Hebrew both (should) have a gutteral letter (Ayin) which usually gets rendered in English either missing or a '. A sound like 'ch' in loch gets rendered in English as j when it comes from Spanish, ch/kh/h from Arabic or Hebrew, g in seTswana. There will always be something lost in translation, which is why people often prefer reading books/articles in the original if they can.
+3
level 47
Jan 7, 2016
You can still use accent marks in English, it's just a bit more difficult. The trouble with dropping the accent on words like Cafe is that you then pronounce it wrong. It's pronounced Caf-ay not Caff and thus the accent makes it clearer.
+2
level 67
Jan 8, 2016
If someone doesn't know what Caffe or café or cafe means because it is pronounced a little differently, they are in trouble if they travel the world, or for that matter if they travel round countries where local accents change every few miles, such as in the UK. ........ Don't sweat the small stuff ....... for it's all small stuff.
+1
level 72
Aug 9, 2018
People are already in trouble if they don't know how to match spelling and pronunciation in English. It's basically like Chinese: remember what the word looks like because it could be spelled a dozen ways.
+4
level 65
Jan 30, 2019
In the case of English, pronunciation is something we need to learn word by word. However, when it comes to these kind of cases where this word in question is clearly not an English word, we should make a difference between A and Ä as that can make the meaning completely different. For example (in Fin.): valittaa = to complain, välittää = to care
+2
level 61
Jun 12, 2019
Not on the keyboard? But yet you can still write don't and can't... if you can use the ' symbol you can use the " symbol... just do "and then the vowel... So by your logic with the english keyboard you can't type can't and don't ?? (and can't quote)

(And I am disregarding the fact that you can type any letter on the typical english keyboard... just use the alt key.. but those arent shown on the keys so I am ok with considering them as "not on the keyboard" But äåéþüúíóöáßðøæñµç really is just as easy as typing a capital letter.. (Typing that was just as fast as qwetyuiopasdlznm, just hold the right alt button down)

I am really curious if you also would have said/think that you can't type café on an english keyboard. (I am honestly kind of baffled by the "we don't have them, so we can't put them in. It is like saying I can't type a capital A because there is no key for it on the keyboard ...(though all letters on the keys are shown in capitals).

+1
level 61
Jun 12, 2019
Btw café caffe cafe etc. In some countries it means coffee, in others it means a bar/pub (where you go at night to drink alcohol), in others it means a place to drink coffee ( and coffeeshop means something else again).

And I thought it wás written in english with the correct symbols. But I guess not. I assumed it would/should be because the word has been taken as a whole from another language, and has not been translated or anglicized, like smorgasboard (partly translated), smurgosbord (partly transliterated), or even smeargooseboard (translated but not as it is used in english, no geese are ( usually..) involved).

Btw I think in dutch we dó use the original swedish spelling..

+5
level 77
Sep 27, 2019
If you get mad at English-speakers who don't use Swedish letters then you should be similarly mad at Swedes who write "Beijing" instead of 北京.
+1
level 43
Sep 27, 2019
Indeed. In Spanish N and Ñ are different letters, it's not an accent mark.
+1
level 66
Sep 27, 2019
I don't think thats a particularly convincing argument. you could argue that any letter with an accent is a "different letter". In french the different forms e, é, è, and ê all have different pronunciations, but they get omitted when these words work their way into the english language. so why is that any different from Swedish or Spanish?
+1
level 37
Sep 27, 2019
@tom88, in French, é, è, ê and ë are not considered different letters, but the same letter with different accents.
+1
level 76
Sep 27, 2019
Karamchand's correct, they are two different letters with different pronunciations, but when translating the latter (which we don't have in the English alphabet) to English we get around the problem by spelling it the way it is pronounced, "ny", as it is in "canyon".
+1
level 33
Sep 28, 2019
People are failing to understand that å ä and ö are actual letters in the Swedish alphabet. It is nothing like the "é" in "café". We have three more letters than the English alphabet does! It goes "...v w x y z å ä ö"
+3
level 48
May 28, 2013
A lot of the time, I just guessed the language of where an object originated.
+1
level 50
Jan 7, 2016
should accept norse for norwegian
+2
level 76
Jan 8, 2016
"Most recent language", so no, it shouldn't. Norse in the sense of Scandinavian would make the quiz far too easy.
+1
level 72
Aug 9, 2018
Like the Normans before they started pretending to be French?
+2
level 85
Nov 16, 2018
Shouldn't Italian be accepted too for "vigilante"?
+2
level 69
Jan 22, 2019
why doesn't sanskrit work for yogi?
+1
level 61
Jun 12, 2019
Cause obviously it is not the most recent language it has derived from..
+1
level 47
Sep 28, 2019
You're right, Sanskrit should work.
+1
level 60
Jun 11, 2019
I tried Polynesian, after trying various South Pacific countries, for Lanai. Too general?
+2
level 63
Jun 11, 2019
Little bit to general, it'd be like saying Germanic for a Swedish word
+2
level 61
Jun 12, 2019
Too lieutenant imo..
+2
level 67
Jun 16, 2019
Not that important ...... I'd say Sergeant.
+1
level 61
Jun 12, 2019
Bah... I tried hindu and indi for yogi.... couldnt think of the right term... And never heard of kielbasa and lanai (or kowtow and samovar, but guessed those right). Are they common in english?

With kowtow I get this image of towing a cow...

+1
level 78
Jun 12, 2019
All four of those words are occasionally used in conversation. In my area kielbasa is usually just called Polish sausage (very good on the grill), lanai is pretty commonly used in South Florida, samovar I know from reading a lot of Russian history, and kowtow - I can't explain how I knew it - maybe from watching Charlie Chan and Bruce Lee movies as a kid.
+1
level 68
Sep 27, 2019
In my area kielbasa is different from a Polish sausage. Polish sausage is smoked after cooking. Also kielbasa is used quite frequently in conversation.
+1
level 65
Jun 13, 2019
Good one! Yacht almost tripped me up, but I manage to puzzle it out.
+2
level 60
Jun 17, 2019
I keep guessing Jiddish with a J... Always...
+1
level 65
Sep 27, 2019
Jeah, Germans yust have it reallj rough.
+2
level 65
Jul 19, 2019
I believe the correct spelling of Scottish whisky is without the 'e'.
+1
level 60
Sep 27, 2019
Yes, whiskey is definitely the Irish variety
+1
level 43
Sep 27, 2019
Isn't Suomi usually accepted for Finnish?
+1
level 63
Sep 27, 2019
Danish and Swedish should also be accepted for Fjord..
+1
level 37
Sep 27, 2019
Ok I spelled Norweigan wrong
+1
level 37
Sep 27, 2019
And I did it again :l
+1
level 47
Sep 27, 2019
Could you accept te reo as an alternative for maori?