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W Vocabulary Words Quiz #2

Guess these vocabulary words that start with the letter W.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedDecember 21, 2012
Last updatedJune 10, 2019
Times taken22,238
Rating3.64
4:00
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Definition
Word
Cowboy movie
Western
Antonym of wane
Wax
Uterus
Womb
One who isn't but wishes he was
Wannabe
Noise made by a horse
Whinny
Trachea
Windpipe
Mafia slang for kill
Whack
Non-dancer at a party
Wallflower
The sum of one's clothing
Wardrobe
An apartment reached by stairs,
not an elevator
Walkup
Definition
Word
Injury caused by violent head jerking
Whiplash
Rabbit's home
Warren
Milk remaining after cheese has curdled
Whey
Marsh or swamp
Wetland
Equipment in cricket or croquet
Wicket
Fold of skin hanging from a turkey's neck
Wattle
German loan word that means prodigy
Wunderkind
Beetle that often attacks cotton or wheat
Weevil
To sharpen a knife on a stone
Whet
Type of instrument such as an oboe,
flute, or clarinet
Woodwind
+2
level 36
Mar 31, 2013
I picked up the Turkey answer from Ally Mcbeal, but due to the ubiquitous American misspronounciation of the letter T I tried woddle, waddle, even wodle, wadle, wuddle and wudle and then gave up. PRONOUNCE YOUR Ts :)
+1
level 66
Jul 31, 2018
This is exactly how I learned the word as well, and I also thought it was 'waddle'!
+1
level 57
Sep 25, 2019
I will not, so there.
+1
level 77
Mar 31, 2013
Got everything except for Wetland, though it took me a minute to figure out wattle due to the the incorrect spelling conventions we were saddled with by the British.
+7
level 55
Mar 31, 2013
nope, you just say it wrong
+1
level 77
Sep 22, 2019
I don't, and though you might, it's unlikely that you pronounce it like "wattle" whether you do or not.
+3
level 65
Feb 2, 2018
'Saddled with'? It didn't stop you changing grey, colour, centre, etc!
+1
level 77
Sep 22, 2019
yeah I know. Noah Webster did a lot of good work he just didn't go far enough.
+1
level 59
Nov 12, 2015
How about the term "wet work" for mafia slang for murder? No? Well at least give me "wabbit hole" for a rabbit's home.
+1
level 61
Sep 22, 2019
I once ran a trivia night that included a "name that tune" bonus round in which I played 15 seconds of a song and the teams had to write down the name on their sheets. Only two teams correctly identified "Ride of the Valkyries," but a third wrote "Kill the Waaaabbit. Kill the Waaaaabbit," so naturally I awarded points to all three of them.
+2
level 58
Nov 12, 2015
I have two pet rabbits, and I have never heard of a warren. Burrow, den, you name it, but never warren. Then again, perhaps it's because the answer to "rabbits' home" for my two bunnies is "my house."
+6
level 76
May 4, 2016
Pet rabbits don't tend to live in warrens.
+2
level 76
Sep 22, 2019
I learned the meaning of warren from the book, Watership Down.The mama cottontail and swamp rabbits here in Missouri make individual nests above ground or rarely, borrow an old groundhog den. Maybe warren is a European thing?
+2
level 67
Jun 2, 2016
Horses also whicker.
+1
level 50
Sep 22, 2019
Thanks for a nice new word. Whicker: to neigh softly, make a breathy whinny
+3
level 67
Feb 6, 2017
I think 'Waste' is also used for Mafia killing.
+1
level 53
Mar 12, 2019
I do too. 'Waste' was the first word I thought of and then couldn't think of another. I think whack is a USAmerican usage more than mafia in Europe.
+1
level 38
Sep 22, 2019
I doubt that "waste" would be used in Europe either, as it is an American word. And I'm sure that the genteel languages of Europe would have a more sophisticated word for murder.
+1
level 61
Aug 20, 2019
Waste was my first attempt too. Definitely a term for killing people. No idea if the mafia used it or not. I did think of whack afterwards. But that is just because i ve been hit to death ( no pun intended) with that word. "ow whack, yea that is shit is whack, whack man" etc. It was quite an ambivalent word.. like crazy it could mean something bad or good..
+1
level 61
Oct 4, 2017
Whinny? I tried things like Whrrrrrrr... :D
+1
level 46
Jul 16, 2018
AARGH!!! I KNEW wattle but spelled it as waddle, and kept trying to change the vowel around. Maybe accept "waddle"?
+3
level 71
Sep 5, 2018
Waddles are for ducks! We can't just go around interchanging poultry like that. It would lead to total anarchy.
+1
level 61
Aug 20, 2019
Haha love this comment I can allready envision the feathery revolution ! Chaos feathers flying all around, a lot of quacking and hissing hahah... and then one lonely lost "HONK!"
+1
level 66
Jul 29, 2019
On my side of the Atlantic, croquet has no wickets.
+1
level 61
Aug 20, 2019
And croquette definitely does not have wickets... Dammit now I am hungry !!
+1
level 76
Sep 22, 2019
Not sure why we call them wickets instead of hoops.
+1
level 61
Aug 20, 2019
Bah I typed both wood and erased (cause could not remember what came after it) then started wind and erased... I though there were two terms and one start with wood and other with wind. And ending in instruments or section.

Also waddle instead of wattle.. and wasteland instead of wetland. (well the land is wasted..)

Well still not too bad 4 wrong for someone whose language isn't english.

+1
level 65
Sep 22, 2019
In terms of German loanwords that start with w, wouldn’t Wunderbar be more well known?
+1
level 70
Sep 22, 2019
Is wunderbar really a loanword though? Is it really used in everyday speech in English?
+1
level 65
Sep 22, 2019
I agree that it’s barely a loanword, but it’s more of one than Wunderkind. I’ve heard people say “Oh, Wunderbar” to a surprisingly good situation (I’ve also heard it used sarcastically). I’ve never heard Wunderkind used at all; instead people stick to English words like prodigy, genius, gifted, talented, precocious, etc.
+2
level 61
Sep 22, 2019
I don't think "wunderbar" is a loan word. It's like "hola" or "merci." People drop it into conversation to be cheeky, but it's not a part of the language in the way that "samurai," "schadenfreude," or "wunderkind" are. The difference is that the former words are just direct translations of simple concepts for which we already have words. The latter group includes words that we adopted into English because we did not have words that fully capture their meanings or connotations.
+1
level 65
Sep 23, 2019
But what extra meaning does Wunderkind convey that isn’t already nicely wrapped up in prodigy or precocious youth? For me, Wunderbar usually conveys a greater level of excitement than wonderful, as the speaker felt moved enough to specifically reach for a German phrase instead of a more common Anglicized form.