Weather and Climate Vocabulary

Based on the definition, guess these words related to climate and weather.
To make it easier, we give you a first letter
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: December 19, 2017
First submittedDecember 19, 2017
Times taken9,938
Rating4.27
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Definition
 
Word
Prolonged period of dry weather
D
Drought
Term for when clouds obscure at least 95% of the sky
O
Overcast
Severe snowstorm
B
Blizzard
Metal that can be found inside thermometers
M
Mercury
Branch of science dealing with weather forecasting
M
Meteorology
Wispy cloud that forms at high altitude
C
Cirrus
Seasonal shift in wind direction, bringing wet or dry air, especially in India
M
Monsoon
Boundary between two different air masses
F
Front
Sustained winds of 50-102 km/h
G
Gale
Tropical cyclone that occurs in the northeast Pacific
T
Typhoon
Measure of the amount of water vapor in the air
H
Humidity
Region of calm weather at the center of a tropical cyclone
E
Eye
Brief snow shower
F
Flurry
Device used to measure air pressure
B
Barometer
Type of cloud that produces thunderstorms
C
Cumulonimbus
Second lowest layer of the atmosphere, beginning 8-18 km above the surface
S
Stratosphere
Term for when, contrary to normal, temperature increases with altitude
I
Inversion
Layer of the atmosphere, with high levels of O3, that blocks UV radiation
O
Ozone
Measure of how much sunlight is reflected
A
Albedo
Gas, emitted by cows, that contributes to global warming
M
Methane
+5
Level 80
Dec 19, 2017
According to Wikipedia, it is lightness rather than brevity that characterizes snow flurries.
+3
Level 63
May 3, 2018
I agree, a flurry is period of very light snowfall, not a burst of snowfall.
+2
Level 77
Dec 19, 2017
Ands so I finally learn how to spell and pronounce drought ...
+1
Level 79
May 3, 2018
When I was young in my area we spelled it drouth, and according to most dictionaries that's now considered a regional variation. Apparently drought is the standard now.
+2
Level 71
Jan 2, 2018
Um... more methane emitted by Natural gas and petroleum systems than by cows or all animal digestive systems combined in the US at least. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/styles/medium/public/2017-04/methanea.png
+15
Level ∞
Jan 2, 2018
Methane, emitted by cows, contributes to global warming. Nowhere does this quiz say that cows are the largest source of methane.
+2
Level 60
May 3, 2018
Cows release methane. Oh my god, i can see where this goes.
+1
Level 70
May 3, 2018
Yup, the clue is uncontroversial.
+1
Level 55
Aug 2, 2019
Decent quiz until I got the methane question. MAJOR, eye roll. Try education on for a challenge
+4
Level 69
Feb 6, 2018
I have a general question: sometimes I know the answer in my mother tongue, but not in English. When it's not a vocabulary quiz, I look it up in a dictionary and type in the answer. Do you think that's cheating? After all I do know the answer just not in the right language... I'm curios what is your opinion on the topic.
+4
Level 63
Feb 20, 2018
I try not to do it but if anwers and time remain when I'm through I look up the translations too. I mean I learn new words this way too so it can't be that bad to do it.
+2
Level 70
May 3, 2018
Exactly.
+5
Level 69
May 3, 2018
I do the same, reasoning it's the knowledge that counts. And generally I don't pause so I give up some quiz time for it. :)
+7
Level 79
May 3, 2018
I don't think that's cheating. On rare occasions I look up a spelling if I know the word but just can't seem to find the right combination of letters. (I never had trouble spelling when I was younger, it's only since I'm in the grandma years that it has become a problem.) If you type in the clue or search the comments for answers, that's cheating IMO. But if you type the word you know for correct spelling or translation, I don't think it is. Usually I find that taking the extra effort commits the word to memory for the next time it shows up. I'm in the camp that it's the knowledge that counts, not the correct spelling or translation, but I know there are others here who will disagree.
+5
Level 80
May 3, 2018
This is just for entertainment. Do what makes you happy. Once in a while if I'm sure I know the answer to something and can't get the answer to fill in I'll look it up and find out I was spelling something wrong or something like that.
+2
Level 16
May 5, 2018
Its not a spelling test, nor is it a language test, therefore I do not consider it cheating.
+2
Level 78
Jul 6, 2018
I agree with the majority on this one - it's how I finally learned how to spell "Tegucigalpa". I knew the word that I wanted, but I just could not come up with the correct combination of letters.
+1
Level 67
Jan 14, 2020
When you know the answer, but only in your mothertongue, I dont consider it cheating, you still have the knowlegde that is asked for, just not full command of the english language. As long as it isnt on vocabulary quizzes like you said. But looking up spelling when english is your mothertongue is a different matter. It is more a grey area, I wouldnt call it flat out cheating, but well you didnt really know the answer either.

I guess it depends on the word and if it is one that you never really see written down or not. I think if you look up the spelling of yacht you are cheating, but if you look up Tegucigalpa or something I would not really consider it cheating (though I am against it personally. Whether you see the correct spelling during or after the quiz, in both cases you can learn from it. And actually getting it wrong is a good reminder of how to spell it)

I guess looking up spelling of places and names feel less like cheating than looking up objects terms and verbs

+7
Level 75
May 3, 2018
Typhoons are more characteristic of the northwest Pacific, off the coast of East Asia, then the northeast Pacific, off the coast of North America, are they not?
+3
Level 60
May 3, 2018
Kayeejo is right. Typhoons are in North-WEST Pacific rather than North-EAST. Plz correct it
+2
Level 83
May 3, 2018
In the Northeastern Pacific they are still called Hurricanes. They become Typhoons west of the International Date Line.

From

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typhoon

"A typhoon differs from a cyclone or hurricane only on the basis of location.[2] A hurricane is a storm that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean, a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, and a tropical cyclone occurs in the south Pacific or Indian Ocean.[2]"

+3
Level 79
May 3, 2018
I don't believe I ever heard the word albedo in my entire life. Thanks for my new word of the day, QM.
+1
Level 80
May 3, 2018
That's the one I missed, too.
+1
Level 55
May 3, 2018
I'd argue that obscured could also work for overcast
+1
Level 64
May 3, 2018
Blizzards are defined by the wind speed and visibility in combination with snow, not the severity or rate of snowfall. Technically, there could be a blizzard with just blowing snow and no actual snowfall.
+1
Level 57
May 3, 2018
Accept "inverse"?
+1
Level 44
Apr 15, 2019
If cow farts contribute to global warming, I'm moving to Canada! I mean Mars!
+2
Level 67
Jan 14, 2020
Bah I typed cumulus nimbus.. (though cunnilingus wanted to interfere...) also mistyped inversion guess maybe I tried invertion ? (English isnt my language, so eventhough I thought of invert, the word inversion didnt immediately pop up. But if I had time to think about it I would gave spotted my mistake.
+1
Level 55
Nov 8, 2020
"cumulus nimbus" is the original latin term for the cloud formation, that apparently then English deformed into "cumulonimbus" that is the answer. I think the original should be accepted.