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Words for Leaders Quiz

We give you the group. You tell us the title given to its leader.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedJuly 13, 2010
Last updatedAugust 28, 2018
Times taken58,444
Rating4.41
5:00
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Group
Leader
The United States
President
Catholic Church
Pope
A Parliamentary Nation
Prime Minister
A City
Mayor
A US State
Governor
An Empire
Emperor
Mongolia
Khan
Germany or Austria, before 1918
Kaiser
Nazi Germany
Führer
Germany, modern
Chancellor
Medieval Venice
Doge
Ancient Egypt
Pharaoh
Group
Leader
Russia, before 1918
Tsar
Iran, before 1979
Shah
A Duchy
Duke
The Eastern Orthodox church
Patriarch
The Ottoman Empire
Sultan
A Ship
Captain
The Roman Republic (co-leader)
Consul
Japan (military dictator, before 1867)
Shogun
A Board of Directors
Chairperson
A Spanish colony
Viceroy
A Catholic diocese
Bishop
Fascist Italy
Duce
+3
level 79
May 31, 2013
Not all parliamentary governments/nations have prime ministers; some have presidents (cf the Marshall Islands).
+2
level 68
Jan 14, 2016
Yes, the definition for Prime Minister is incorrect, since having one has little to do with being a "Parlamentary Nation". The origin of the title comes from monarchies, where the king named his "prime minister" to rule the realm. I would recommend to change the definition to simply "The United Kingdom (or Greece, or Israel, or whatever).
+1
level 54
Jun 17, 2019
naming a country kind of defeats the purpose of this quiz and even if you do so, you must list them all... so no that would be a bad suggestion imo
+8
level 71
Dec 10, 2017
A lot of parliamentary countries have Presidents, but this is largely a ceremonial role. The Prime Minister in most cases is the political leader
+1
level 17
Jul 21, 2013
"Duce" should be El Duce, Mussolini's full title was El Duce.
+1
level 63
Oct 8, 2013
Nope, you don't have "el" in Italian - he was just Duce
+3
level 32
Jun 5, 2014
It was Il Duce. You should at least include that and El Duce in the answers because it is a very common way to say it and that is what the Wikipedia article has it as.
+7
level 69
Jun 1, 2016
Including 'El Duce' has a correct answer would be like including 'Der Queen' as a correct answer for a question about the ruler of the UK's title. It is plainly wrong. 'Il Duce', fine because it's a common enough way of referring to him and given it wasn't a formal title it doesn't make sense to be too pedantic. But 'El' is not a word in Italian, having that as an option is absurd.
+3
level 45
Jun 3, 2018
I agree that Il Duce should be accepted, but the answer should be displayed as Duce. El Duce should not be accepted.
+1
level 54
Jun 17, 2019
I think you are all wrong. Il duce was the nickname for Mussolini, just duce is the definition of the type of leader.
+18
level 47
Apr 22, 2014
Medieval Venice had a "Doge," you say?! So Venice. Much Leader. Wow.
+3
level 82
Aug 6, 2014
Is this some kind of a callback? I have no context for deciphering this type of thing. It's not quite Yoda, but it's definitely something like that.
+1
level 50
Aug 14, 2014
It's what's known as 'Dogespeak'. It's pretty funny.
+2
level 25
Jun 7, 2014
Please accept Bundeskanzler, too.
+1
level 65
Jan 14, 2016
I typed that about three times before I thought to type it in English.
+1
level 48
Jun 23, 2014
Well I learnt something new, consul trumps proconsul, who'd have thought?
+1
level 36
Jan 10, 2015
Love the quiz! 13/24.
+1
level 61
Jan 19, 2015
In English, you use the term "Kaiser"?
+3
level 56
Jan 14, 2016
Yes
+1
level 73
Dec 3, 2016
like tzar
+1
level 38
Nov 17, 2017
It's either Tsar or Czar.
+1
level 75
Jun 25, 2018
Kaiser, tsar, and czar all come from the Latin for caesar, one answer that I expected to see on the quiz but didn't.
+1
level 54
Jun 17, 2019
caesar is simply his last name, It was not until after caesar that variations of his name started to be equivalent of emperor.
+2
level 61
Jan 27, 2018
interesting, in Czech we just called these "Kaisers" Emperors (tsar is "car" in Czech so that's the same)
+4
level 75
Jan 28, 2015
A few answers to this quiz are discriminatory. While some titles are typically applied equally to both genders (like "governor" and "president"), some of them are only used for men (e.g. tsar and duke'). Women have held these posts too and it's unfortunate to see a quiz called "Words for Leaders" exclude women in this way. Thank you for using "chairperson." Please fix this quiz.
+7
level 65
Jun 24, 2018
Good grief.
+1
level 40
Oct 10, 2018
there's always one
+1
level 54
Jun 17, 2019
Duchess was accepted for duke, I have no idea about the other ones. But really I didnt see a problem here.
+1
level 67
Feb 9, 2015
Perhaps triumvir should count for co-leader of Roman Republic? As long as it's before Augustus I think it's acceptable.
+4
level 76
Dec 18, 2015
I put "duck" by accident for "duke" and laughed rather too much.
+1
level 67
Jan 14, 2016
nice quiz 24/24 with 3.11 left
+2
level 79
Jan 14, 2016
The title "tsar" was replaced by "emperor" ("imperator") already in 1721 in Russia (Peter the Great). The last tsardom was the tsardom of Bulgaria (until 1946).
+1
level 48
Jan 14, 2016
I'm kinda surprised to see neither king or queen, especially as these have been a round longer than a good chunk of the answers. Also stuff like Chieftian or something
+1
level 57
Jan 14, 2016
Please accept Kanzler and/or Bundeskanzler for Germany.
+1
level 72
Jan 14, 2016
Second. When you accept 'führer', which means leader, then (Bundes)Kanzler(in) should work
+4
level 67
Jan 15, 2016
Fuhrer and Kaiser (and indeed all the titles in this quiz) are titles known and used in English speech. 'Bundeskansler or 'Kanzler' would be correct if the quiz was in German.
+1
level 71
Jun 8, 2017
No "Bundeskanzler" would be correct, but not "Bundeskansler"
+1
level 66
Jan 14, 2016
suggestion: please accept 'virrey' as viceroy. That's just how they were called there
+1
level 85
Jan 14, 2016
please accept PM for prime minister
+1
level 44
Jan 15, 2016
Can you also accept governor-general for Spanish colony? Post-1821, the Viceroyalty of New Spain ceased to exist and Guam and the Philippines were ruled directly by the Spanish Crown through the governor-general.
+1
level 49
Jan 17, 2016
What on earth is a chairperson? I tried everything from CEO to director to manager.
+2
level 79
Jun 24, 2018
You've never heard of a "chairman of the board" or "chair of the board"? It's simply the gender neutral title. A CEO reports to the Board of Directors for most companies, and the chair is the head of that board.
+1
level 54
Aug 3, 2016
Parliamentary nation PM thing, already addressed in comments (just do UK or something). Not all empires are ruled by an emperor, but that's a nitpick I guess. Mongolia is ruled by a president, and people get what is meant but more specific would be good. Accept kanzler and stuff for modern Germany, and caliph for Ottomans, and there's the whole consul (triumvir, co emperors, other positions?) thing.
+1
level 78
Jul 8, 2017
I thought archbishops outranked bishops.
+1
level 75
Jun 25, 2018
They do, but they govern archdioceses, not dioceses. BTW, while this clue is correct, I'd like to point out that many Orthodox and Protestant denominations have bishops, but not all of them are over dioceses.There are various other names used.
+1
level 50
Oct 24, 2017
I would have thought the "board of directors" question would have had the answer "CEO" for it.
+1
level 38
Nov 17, 2017
A CEO is the Chief Executive Officer of a Company. He/She reports to the Board of Directors, which is headed by a Chairperson.
+1
level 66
Dec 1, 2017
Chairperson is a bit of a reach. Managing Director is much more common.
+3
level 38
Dec 17, 2017
You know, people being so sick and tired of this pseudo politically correctness is what got Trump elected. (his lunacy was like a breath of fresh air to many). The differences between the gender-neutral and traditional appellations don't amount to a hill of beans!
+3
level 57
Jan 27, 2019
It's actually quite funny- the people who call people in favour of equality "snowflakes" are the same people who spit their dummies out when they're asked to default to "chairperson" instead of "chairman" It's a very simple and effortless thing to do, and it makes such a difference to use more inclusive language (it's amazing how the subconscious mind works), and yet they act like it's the most arduous task! And they say the other group are the weak and easily offended ones!
+1
level 54
Jun 17, 2019
Anybody that calls anybody else a snowflake, no matter how silly the thing was the other person said ( while a lot of times there is a genuinly good point in there, but yea there are also persons that make an issue of absolutely everything) is done in my book. It shows more about the character of the person that calls someone that, and often those personalities are rather ugly..

same with the you must be fun at parties, often the original comment is actually interesting and has a good point, but yea, sometimes quite boring or a bit too anal/nitpicking. But why the need to trash somebody just because you found their remark boring. That is soo childish, sadly often it is adults making these remarks...

+1
level 45
Feb 14, 2018
General Secretary for a Communist Nation?
+2
level 64
Jun 24, 2018
Weird, as a German I would've translated Kaiser as emperor.
+1
level 57
Jun 24, 2018
nice one, well done QM
+1
level 64
Jun 24, 2018
Great quiz!
+1
level 65
Jun 24, 2018
I put Mussolini for leader of Fascist Italy because I couldn't think of the name.
+2
level 49
Jun 24, 2018
I was pretty sure the answer for United States was Dotard in Chief.
+1
level 60
Jun 25, 2018
really? I guess someone had to screw things up.
+1
level 38
Jun 24, 2018
Doge really venice
+1
level 61
Jun 25, 2018
I've never heard the word "chairperson" in my entire life.
+1
level 44
Jun 26, 2018
You've heard of chairman...butnow everythink went political corect...therefore person....
+1
level 59
Jun 25, 2018
I always assumed "Il duce" was just Italian for "duke." Is that wrong? Is it really a separate term altogether?
+1
level 72
Jun 26, 2018
I'll bow to those who know the language better, but remember from my History lessons it simply means "The Leader"
+1
level 72
Jun 26, 2018
(and so does Duke, so it seems...)
+1
level 54
Jun 17, 2019
it is, but is like king and koning/köning/kung/konge. And kaiser/tzar/czar they all come from the same thing.
+1
level 44
Jun 26, 2018
I think kanzler should be accepted in german...
+1
level 63
Jan 24, 2019
Quizmaster, would you please add Caudillo to the quiz? It would complete the Fascist Leader Titles Trifecta and bring the quiz to a nice even 25 questions.
+1
level 59
Feb 15, 2019
I only got the US State answer because I remember Arnold being called the Governator, which I very nearly started to type!
+1
level 54
Jun 17, 2019
same haha, I thought man what was it called again, but I couldnt think of it. Then I thought, yea think of schwarzenegger and terminator then it might come to you and instantly I knew.
+1
level 76
Jun 1, 2019
Other spellings for counsel? concil? Maybe pontiff for pope?
+1
level 65
Jul 3, 2019
I don't think Bishop is especially a Catholic title so the clue is slightly misleading. it's also used in the Anglican Church as well as some Orthodox churches.
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