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Words Derived from Place Names

Guess these words whose etymology comes from a place name.
All the answers are a SINGLE WORD
The words are derived from place names, not equal to place names
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: October 28, 2016
First submittedJanuary 31, 2012
Times taken26,445
Rating4.16
5:00
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Definition
Place
Word
Ground beef
sandwich
German city
Hamburger
Hot dog
German city
Frankfurter
Austrian city
Wiener
Type of swimsuit
Pacific atoll
Bikini
Type of lunch meat
Italian city
Bologna
Ball sport
English town
Rugby
Porcelain
Country
China
Unconventional and
artistic
Czech region
Bohemian
Cylindrical red hat
Moroccan city
Fez
Long race
Greek city
Marathon
Type of pastry
Country
Danish
Mustard
French city
Dijon
Definition
Place
Word
Health club
Belgian city
Spa
Men's formal wear
New York city
Tuxedo
Forbidden sexual activity
Biblical city
Sodomy
To kidnap a person for
service on a ship
Chinese city
Shanghai
Paper used in certain
envelopes
Philippine city
Manila
Extinct human species
German valley
Neanderthal
Fragmentation into
smaller countries
European region
Balkanization
Overly complex
Former Roman city
Byzantine
Sweet, fortified wine
Portuguese city
Port
Homosexual woman
Greek island
Lesbian
Yellow bird
Spanish islands
Canary
+2
level 71
Jan 31, 2012
Clever quiz...pretty happy w/ 18.
+1
level 73
Jan 31, 2012
Cool quiz!
+1
level 51
Feb 1, 2012
great quiz! learned a lot!
+1
level 19
Mar 30, 2013
argh i knew the sodomy question had to do with sodom
+1
level 73
Aug 13, 2014
The canary did not get its name from the canary islands. But rather, the canary islands were so named by King Juba because of the "vast multitudes of dogs of very large size." The island was originally called Canariae Insulae, or "Island of the Dogs." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canary_islands
+3
level ∞
Aug 14, 2014
The bird is named for the islands, not vice versa.
+2
level 76
Nov 26, 2015
The islands were named the Canary Islands after dogs. The birds were then named after the islands, just to confuse etymologists in the future.
+1
level 73
Jul 18, 2018
Wikipedia articles are written, overwritten, undone and flamed back and forth by anyone with an opinion and an internet connection. Never use them as a source. Hey, you or your internet sparring partner can just go change it like anyone else on the internet.
+3
level 62
Jul 25, 2019
According to one study that counted the amount of errors within, Wikipedia is as reliable as the Encyclopaedia Britannica. Yes, dictionaries also have mistakes, turns out having something printed doesn't make it indisputable truth. How about that.
+2
level 61
Sep 17, 2019
yea, I am not saying it is foulproof and the best source for everything, but the fact that anyone can edit it does not make the best argument against it. It means that all faults can get picked out. Unlike dictionaries and other written sources, often only edited by 1 person (and perhaps written by 1 too) I would think that would make a bigger argument for getting it wrong.

the only thing when it gets messy is when it is more about opinions than facts. When it is about thngs that can be proven or measured, (just like in science) things will be altered untill the best most correct version keeps standing. But with unclear matters it can become pingpong (but wether that is better or worse than one of the opinions being forced upon you as the one and only truth like when it comes from a single source..

I can write a book claiming the earth is flat, ow wait, a cube perhaps, and since noone can argue with me, it will be the truth..

+1
level 76
Aug 20, 2014
Never heard Byzantine used as an adjective. I guess I need to get out more.
+3
level 77
Aug 31, 2014
It's all Greek to me.
+1
level 54
Aug 31, 2014
Although I clearly should have gotten bologna, I couldn't get genoa salami out of my head. The clue seems to fit this answer.
+1
level 76
Apr 2, 2017
Except the caveat which says all answers are one word.
+1
level 67
Jun 20, 2019
What about Parma?
+1
level 77
Aug 31, 2014
I suppose I missed the Italicized warning about single words but I tried Vienna sausage a couple times.
+1
level 68
Aug 31, 2014
Me too - Vienna...Viennese...no luck.
+1
level 58
Aug 31, 2014
Bologna doesn't mean anything to me. But... Parma ham?
+1
level 45
Aug 31, 2014
Spaghetti Bolognese, Milanese, etc :)
+1
level 67
Apr 2, 2017
baloney?
+1
level 67
Apr 2, 2017
Bologna is a sausage similar to mortadella except usually has conspicuous small pieces of lard in the mix. Great for sandwiches.
+1
level 79
Apr 2, 2017
actually, in Italy, bologna and mortadella are used to define the same product, even if bologna is more used in northern italy, while mortadella is widespread in central/southern italy
+1
level 35
Aug 31, 2014
Bologna? Seriously?? Never heard of eating a bologna in my life! Must be an American thing (like Wieners).
+1
level 49
Aug 31, 2014
I guess it could be an American thing. It's pronounced "Baloney" and usually sold pre-sliced as a kind of generic lunch meat.
+1
level 73
Sep 2, 2014
actually...in pennsylvania dutch country it is pronounced bologna for the food...sweet bologna...lebanon bologna
+1
level 66
Sep 2, 2014
"American things" that were named after European cities. You're probably right, I just find it humorous. :D
+1
level 77
Apr 2, 2017
hamburgers are also an American thing named after a European city. But there are and always have been a lot of immigrants in America, so stuff gets named after things from other places.
+1
level 61
Sep 17, 2019
That is often the way it goes. other countries naming stuff, while in the country itself it ( obvisouly) does not have that adverb, or sometimes it is named after another country.
+1
level 77
Jul 25, 2019
If Wiener is an American thing then explain Wiener Schnitzel.
+1
level 61
Sep 17, 2019
Those are two different things and are not related. Just because two thing are named after the same geographical region does not mean they are connected. Like lots of things are called "French"

Btw we do not have wieners , but we do have wiener schitzel, though 99% of the time it is just called schnitzel. (we have knakworstjes, snapsausages is the closest translation)

+1
level 49
Aug 31, 2014
I don't even know that there is Manila paper before I've googled it. I'd known only Manila rope.
+1
level 58
Feb 9, 2015
"I'll never forget that sweet Filipino girl who taught me the position known as: The Manila Envelope" - Arthur (Rip Torn) from the Larry Sanders Show.
+1
level 71
Aug 4, 2016
I only knew of manila folders.
+2
level 49
Aug 31, 2014
This was a great quiz, thank you. It was interesting, unusual, well planned and educational. It really made me dredge through my memory banks for some of the answers and I learnt a few things about the answers I did not already know. Thank you
+1
level 42
Sep 1, 2014
I kept trying frank n furter to no avail...sad day
+1
level 80
Sep 2, 2014
Great quiz, not sure why I got hung up on danish, but finally got it.
+1
level 60
Sep 2, 2014
MIssed Balkanization as I kept trying "Balkanize". Perhaps that should be accepted.
+1
level 54
Sep 4, 2014
I tried that (with an "s" first), thought I must have been wrong so never tried balkanisation. Would be nice to have the shorter version accepted as well.
+1
level 71
Nov 9, 2015
Agreed - extra syllable -ation is superfluous
+1
level ∞
Oct 28, 2016
We'll accept balkanize now.
+1
level 42
Sep 4, 2014
Tried and tried "balkanize" even though the question asked for a noun.
+1
level 76
May 30, 2015
Thought of Badminton before I thought of Rugby... I'm always forgetting that you don't play badminton with a ball. D'oh!
+1
level 52
Dec 23, 2015
You should accept more variants of "balkanization." I tried several, but couldn't get the specific one you chose.
+1
level 54
May 10, 2016
+1 on Parma Ham Also, Madeira is also a fortified wine named after a Portuguese City.
+1
level 73
Jul 18, 2018
Madeira's an island. Porto, or Opporto, is Portugal's #2 city.
+1
level 52
Feb 17, 2017
'THE CITY WAS BYZANTIUM' - Gunner1104
+1
level 77
Apr 2, 2017
It's not asking for the city, it's asking for the word derived from the name of the city.
+2
level 70
Feb 23, 2017
Racked my brain for a country that was also a pastry. Danish? Good quiz!
+1
level 67
Apr 2, 2017
Which is called wiener brod (Vienna bread) in Denmark, if I'm correct. Really, danishes are very good in Denmark. They should take the credit.
+2
level 69
Apr 2, 2017
Bit disappointed that "spam" isn't an Italian city...
+1
level 59
Apr 2, 2017
On the front page: "Another type [of hot dog] is named after a city in Vienna." Vienna is itself a city. You probably meant "a city in Austria".
+1
level 62
Apr 2, 2017
Interesting quiz. I always thought that the Canary Islands were named after the bird, not the other way around.
+1
level 74
Apr 3, 2017
They were named after dogs (canis in Latin)
+1
level 76
Apr 4, 2017
So, all in all, some birds was named after dogs. Wonder if they love the idea.
+1
level 77
Apr 2, 2017
fes for fez?
+1
level 71
Apr 2, 2017
Remember -- the answer is the common English word, not its inspiration. As the Drunken Shriner said to some of his fellow conventioneers, "I remember the fez but I can't place the name."
+1
level 77
Apr 2, 2017
I thought "spa" was a Latin acronym. Sanus per Aquam (health through water)
+4
level 67
Apr 2, 2017
You've been reading the 'Urban Myth' handbook again.
+3
level 77
Apr 4, 2017
nah there are just a lot of bad tour guides in Italy.
+1
level 57
Jul 25, 2019
Half the job of a tour guide is to lie to make the place they are doing a tour of seen more influential or interesting.
+2
level 78
Apr 2, 2017
Spa towns are named after the Belgian town, whose name is probably a relative of "sparse", not an acronym.
+1
level 77
Apr 4, 2017
that makes more sense.
+1
level 61
Sep 17, 2019
Sparse?? what ? No. Where did you get that from (can't find any reference to sparsity) . The name of the town came from the local word for spring, "espa" first it was just a description (like with many placenames), later turned into a name.
+1
level 40
Apr 2, 2017
What about Bratwurst?
+1
level 39
Apr 5, 2017
Not named after a place but the manner of cooking (brat=fried).
+1
level 48
Apr 2, 2017
I feel like the clue for Tuxedo should be " New York town". Tuxedo/Tuxedo Park is not a city, and it can obviously be confused as "New York City", which it is not named after.
+1
level 73
Jul 18, 2018
New York city means a city in New York, New York City or otherwise. Super easy for people who know place names are capitalized I guess.
+1
level 64
Apr 2, 2017
Stunned that more people didn't get "Byzantine". I guess I'm just really good... :)
+1
level 76
Apr 2, 2017
I think many, myself included, were thrown off by calling it "formerly Roman."
+1
level 40
Apr 2, 2017
Most of the ones I missed I could come up with the place, but not the word
+1
level 51
Apr 3, 2017
You are aware that this is the WORLD WIDE web, right? So why are the most irritating of all subsets of the human species - Americans, making world-visible content with Americanisations? No one but an American would ever call "lunch meat" (what even is that?!?!?) "bologna." You're showing your ignorance. Make generic quizzes next time, not American-specific.
+2
level 76
Apr 3, 2017
Not American, easy 100%.
+2
level 73
Jul 18, 2018
How about make your own quiz under a website with your country's domain name? Sorry for having so many English speakers and bringing you the internet. If you don't like it, pretend "annoying" Americans never developed the internet for you and you won't encounter them on it. If you want to play bigoted and group people by nationality, don't reveal yours because you're an embarrassment who will only invite unwarranted scorn from your fellow bigots upon your wonderful country.
+2
level 61
Apr 3, 2017
Gee, a hot dog named after a city in Vienna, what could it be?
+1
level 73
Jul 18, 2018
A Vienna sausage, every toddler's favorite introduction to salted, canned crap.
+1
level 58
Oct 22, 2017
Huh, I never knew Vienna had any cities...
+1
level 76
Nov 10, 2017
I didn't know that about the word spa, it turns up in a lot of place names but I didn't know that it was ultimately derived from a place name.
+1
level 61
Sep 17, 2019
Remember though, that baths are not named after Bath, but in this case the other way around ;)
+1
level 50
Apr 22, 2018
Got 18. Knew a couple more as it turns out
+1
level 67
Jan 5, 2019
Since "weenie" is a localization (primarily Midwest and somewhat in the Northeast) of the word "wiener," possibly it could be accepted? It still retains a similar pronunciation to "Wien," the origin word.
+1
level 40
Jul 25, 2019
I put 'Bohemia' instead of 'Bohemian'
+1
level 38
Jul 25, 2019
Really nice quiz idea! Missed Danish and a few others, but found the quiz extremely interesting nonetheless.
+1
level 59
Sep 30, 2019
Spa is not a city, the clue should be changed to Belgian town. I thought it was some American gym club that I wasn't aware of called Ghent.
+1
level 64
Sep 30, 2019
I thought sodomy just meant anal sex? Well, I guess in some countries that is still forbidden..
+1
level 76
Sep 30, 2019
Sodomy generally refers to anal sex, but can also be used to refer to other sexual acts that one's government and/or religious leaders don't approve of. In its most restrictive, it can refer to ANY non-procreative sexual act.