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WWII Trivia

Based on the hints, name these people, places, battles, and words from World War 2.
Last updated: January 27, 2018
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Hint
Answer
Country invaded by Germany
on September 1, 1939
Poland
German word for "lightning war"
Blitzkrieg
Name of the German air force
Luftwaffe
Turning point of the Pacific theater
Battle of Midway
Largest concentration camp
Auschwitz
English translation of "panzer"
Tank
German city that was firebombed in
February 1945, killing 25,000
Dresden
German encryption machine cracked
by British & Polish codebreakers
Enigma
Town from where the British
evacuated France in 1940
Dunkirk
Term for a German submarine
U-Boat
Term for Japanese suicide bombers
Kamikaze
The U.S. nuclear program
Manhattan Project
Hint
Answer
December 7, 1941,
a date that will live in ...
Infamy
Name for June 6, 1944
D-Day
What the V stands for in
V-E day
Victory
British Prime Minister
(for most of the war)
Winston Churchill
British King
George VI
President of the U.S.
Franklin D. Roosevelt
Harry Truman
Supreme Allied
commander in Europe
Dwight Eisenhower
Russian dictator
Joseph Stalin
German führer
Adolf Hitler
Italian duce
Benito Mussolini
Japanese emperor
Hirohito
+7
level 40
Apr 2, 2013
Enigma was cracked by Polish codebrakers - not British!
+13
level 60
Apr 8, 2013
It was a combined effort! The Polish did a lot of early work which the British continued at Bletchley Park with the work of Alan Turing and the rest of the codebreakers as well making use of the computing power of Colossus.
+1
level 58
Jun 3, 2013
:)
+8
level 73
Jun 6, 2013
The Polish were able to capture the machine and get it to the British. One of the most important events of the war, there's enough credit to go around.
+2
level 13
Jun 10, 2013
No no, the Poles not only capture but also broke the code. The man's name was Rejewski.
+1
level 71
Oct 3, 2013
Didn't Rejewski crack an early version of Enigma, before the war? I'm no expert, but I remember reading about a Pole who was an exceptional code breaker and whose work gave Turing and co a huge head start. Could be a different Pole, I suppose...
+3
level 45
Oct 4, 2013
There were 3 of them, in 1933 so before the war. Rejewski, Zygalski and Różycki broke the enigma code in 1933 and gave their results to the British who used this during the war.
+1
level 69
Feb 9, 2014
I thought the Poles worked mainly on the commercial enigma in the 30's.
+3
level 21
Feb 19, 2014
According to the Wikipedia German military texts enciphered on the Enigma machine were first broken by the Polish Cipher Bureau, beginning in December 1932. This success was a result of efforts by three Polish cryptologists, Marian Rejewski, Jerzy Różycki and Henryk Zygalski, working for Polish military intelligence. Rejewski "reverse-engineered" the device, using theoretical mathematics and material supplied by French military intelligence. Subsequently the three mathematicians designed mechanical devices for breaking Enigma ciphers, including the cryptologic bomb. Unfortunately credits for the most important event in the WWII were taken by British.
+8
level 11
Feb 7, 2015
Have you people not seen the movie "U-571"???? If you had, you would know that the Americans single handedly captured an Enigma machine, thus saving the world...... Well... according to Hollywood anyway!
+4
level 73
Nov 2, 2015
^Right. And Jet Li built the Great Wall of China.
+1
level 56
Nov 2, 2015
The Poles originally broke the Enigma, but the version used in WW2 was altered to be more complex, hence more secure, and the Poles didn't really have the resources to adapt their method to the adapted setup. Operational changes also made the Polish approach less useful. That said, the original breakthrough, and most of the credit, probably belongs to the Polish team.
+4
level 56
Mar 23, 2017
The Poles certainly did break Enigma, and any book I've read on Bletchley Park or on Enigma gives them credit. Enigma did evolve though, with the German navy adding a fourth wheel making it harder to crack, and that was after Poland had been invaded. There was also the Lorenz machine, which was even more sophisticated that the British cracked at Bletchley Park (with the other lesser-known "hero" Tommy Flowers building Colossus, the world's first programmable electronic computer)
+4
level 52
May 2, 2018
So it wasn't the Poles who broke the code, but rather a Pole (or a few Poles). I love it when completely unrelated people take pride in the achievements of others (identify with them) just because they share a common label with them - nationality, race, gender etc. - which doesn't actually determine any substantive individual qualities. The beauty of mankind.
+1
level 28
Aug 19, 2018
The Brits captured the machine when they boarded a U-Boat
+3
level ∞
Jul 13, 2015
Added Polish to the clue.
+1
level 5
Nov 2, 2015
ha-ha!
+1
level 20
Dec 14, 2016
The poles cracked it, Alan Turing made the machine.
+1
level 73
Mar 16, 2018
Wasn't the issue then that the method for cracking the enigma code was developed but because the code was changed every day and it took longer than that to decipher it it was useless until Turing and his team came up with a computer that could do it more efficiently?
+1
level 56
Jun 18, 2018
They had to do something with all their spare time after conquest.
+1
level 14
Jul 29, 2018
And yet Poland was not prepared for the German invasion 7 years later so they may have cracked it but didn't do much with it did they!
+1
level 28
Aug 19, 2018
wrong. It was the brits
+4
level 50
May 6, 2013
u-boot and unterseeboot should be accepted for german submarines
+2
level 68
May 11, 2013
yes, i agree about that
+4
level 12
Nov 1, 2013
u-boot = underwater shoe?
+2
level 28
Dec 8, 2013
if you ask for the name of the thing, at least accept the german name indeed: U-Boot (Boot = German for Ship)
+2
level 45
Aug 4, 2015
Boot does not mean shoe in German, it means boat
+1
level 56
Jun 18, 2018
Very astute, Sister Sarah.
+3
level ∞
Jul 13, 2015
Unterseeboot will work now.
+4
level 68
Nov 2, 2015
... and U-Boot? It's commonly referred to as this in Germany.
+1
level 55
Nov 2, 2015
same, just tried "uboot". please also accept this...
+2
level 60
Nov 2, 2015
"U-Boot" is used in Estonia also. After typing it, I skipped the question. Furthermore, it's a difference of 1 letter from "U-Boat". I think it should count.
+1
level ∞
Nov 2, 2015
Okay
+3
level 31
May 25, 2013
Dunkerque and Duinkerke should be accepted as answers
+1
level 65
Jun 21, 2015
I agree! I gave up after trying Dunkerque.
+2
level ∞
Jul 13, 2015
Okay, those will work now.
+2
level 73
Jun 6, 2013
I always thought Panzer meant panther... I guess maybe I just assumed that years ago because there were also tigers and leopards, so it makes sense and sounds similar... I knew panzers were tanks but I missed that one because I thought the word must have some other meaning. Would have gotten it if the clue was just "what was a panzer." oh well.
+1
level 14
Aug 9, 2013
I thought the same exact thing but then I remembered "panzerfaust" and panther fist wouldn't really make sense.
+5
level 76
Dec 13, 2013
Tank fist makes just as much sense as panther fist...
+3
level 73
Apr 29, 2015
less, I would say.
+1
level 16
Aug 19, 2015
Tried panther first it tanked so tried tank next and it tank!
+1
level 55
Nov 2, 2015
Guess what... we also have a "fliegerfaust" in german :-)
+4
level 73
Feb 1, 2018
Panther Fist makes a ton of sense and sounds like a criminal organization from a James Bond movie.
+1
level 20
Apr 7, 2014
The most direct translation would be armour, which later turned into tank. The allied tanks we're also often mentioned as armour, e.g. "Send in the armoured division"
+1
level 49
Feb 25, 2018
an armored unit = 1 tank, in some contexts.. send in teh armored column would mean send in the tanks..etc. haha
+2
level 24
Jun 6, 2013
Y u no accept FDR?
+1
level ∞
Jul 22, 2013
Sorry, that will work now.
+2
level 56
Jun 7, 2018
Y u no rite proper?
+3
level 6
Jun 6, 2013
I think it would be more appropriate to call this quiz the WWII European Theater Quiz, considering only 3 of the 24 questions are about the Pacific Theater. I'm not trying to be critical, but the title does seem to be a bit of a misnomer...
+2
level ∞
Jun 6, 2013
I think the balance is appropriate, given the much greater emphasis placed on the European theater by the Allied powers.
+4
level 40
Jun 8, 2013
Actually Quizzy, that is an interesting point. If we are talking about appropriate balance then almost all of the questions should of been about the Russian Front. That's where approx. 90% all Axis fatalities occurred. The Western Front was really more of a sideshow. Still a good quiz though. :)
+8
level 66
Apr 29, 2015
Don't forget that Britain and the British Commonwealth were fighting this war for years before the Americans and Russians bothered to join in.
+3
level 60
Jun 6, 2018
Russians joined the war early on. They attacked Poland together with Germans. Later they invaded Finland and annexed the baltic states. They joined Allies only because Hitler attacked them.
+2
level 44
Jun 7, 2013
88%...not bad...
+2
level 48
Jun 7, 2013
I think, strictly speaking, Panzer translates to 'armour'.
+1
level ∞
Jun 8, 2013
Okay, I'll allow armor as well as tank:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panzer
+2
level 49
Feb 25, 2018
in German they were called Panzerkampfwagon.. which in English means Armored- field - wagon. or something like that..
+1
level 29
Jun 6, 2018
Panzerkampfwagen translates to "armoured combat vehicle" or "armoured fighting vehicle"
+2
level 17
Jun 8, 2013
"Panzer" translates as armor, not tank.
+2
level 33
Nov 4, 2015
It's armour
+1
level 23
Nov 5, 2015
what?
+3
level 21
Jun 9, 2013
Dunkerque should really be accepted. It is an original spelling! I would never think of trying Dunkirk.. Nice quiz though.
+1
level 33
Nov 12, 2013
+1 tried all possible combinations, never heard "Dunkirk" in my life
+2
level 42
Dec 18, 2013
At that time, the term armor, referred to tank or any other armored vehicle that either side possessed.
+1
level 43
Jan 1, 2014
100% with 1:45 to go, I guess I paid attention in history class
+2
level 5
Mar 12, 2014
It allows for just the last name of every person with the exception of the Japanese emperor.
+4
level 48
May 1, 2014
Please accept the French name of "Dunkirk": Dunkerque... too hard too find for a French like me! And U-Boot should be accepted too. Good quiz though!
+2
level 34
May 22, 2014
Just want to point out, "D-Day" was a generic term for any day when a major landing was to take place. June 6, 1944 should be referred to, more appropriately as operation overlord
+3
level 33
Nov 4, 2015
It's always referred to as d day and that's how everyone knows it's so it doesn't matter too much
+3
level 32
Jun 7, 2014
Marian Rejewski broke the enigma code in 1932 years before we broke it during the war
+1
level 74
Jun 6, 2018
Did you read the previous comments?
+1
level 39
Jan 31, 2015
was presently surprised I guessed Truman correctly, I only recently found out he had become president during the war. I had also thought Roosevelt had been president during the whole thing. Only missed the Manhattan Project, I didn't have a clue so I just typed in things like 'boom' and 'bang'
+1
level 16
Aug 19, 2015
I could not think of his name but knew that roosevelt had died during the war. Truman had a lot on his plate assuming the presidency during and after the war. He was a man fit for the job. Or a least he had the right people behind him.
+1
level 74
Jun 6, 2018
Surprised that everyone doesn't know Truman since he's the one who approved the dropping of the bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and he approved the creation of Israel and went against his own State Department and immediately recognized their new government. He was also famous for his salty language. There's a story that once a friend asked his wife Bess if she couldn't get Harry to say fertilizer instead of "manure". Bess replied, "Good Lord, Helen, you don't know how many years it has taken me to get him to say manure."
+2
level 59
Feb 4, 2015
This is far too focused on the Anglo-American side of the war. More like "Western Front and Pacific Theater Trivia". It's actually repulsive to me that Eisenhower is on this quiz and Zhukov isn't.
+3
level 64
May 1, 2018
Really, repulsive?
+1
level 74
Jun 6, 2018
Why don't you make a quiz from the Russian perspective? I think it would be an interesting and educational quiz. Probably most people, unless they were interested in history or the military, wouldn't remember Eisenhower's name had he not later become a US president.
+2
level 73
Apr 29, 2015
If you did well on the leaders portion of this quiz you might enjoy this expanded version, though prepare to be repulsed if you go in looking for Zhukov. It's modeled after the World Leaders quizzes and only includes kings, prime ministers and so on, not generals.
+1
level 45
Jul 22, 2015
Ugh, I could NOT think of Dunkirk. I could tell the almost the whole story of what happened there, but couldn't remember the name of the place.
+2
level 46
Nov 2, 2015
Great quiz but could you be a bit more forgiving on spelling? I spent half the quiz trying in vain to spell Chamberlain
+2
level 74
Jun 6, 2018
So, are you asking QM to accept Chamberlain as an alternative spelling for Churchill? If he goes for it there are several alternative spellings I'd like him to consider, especially in the world capitals quiz. :)
+1
level 62
Nov 2, 2015
I should probably learn more about WW2 after taking this quiz...
+1
level 16
Nov 3, 2015
I wish their was more latitude when it comes to spelling. Blitzkr I am sure that most people could figure what word this was. I like trivia spellink not so munch.
+1
level 43
Nov 6, 2015
I completely blanked on how to spell "Luftwaffe" ugh.
+2
level 49
Feb 25, 2018
took me four or five tries I spelled concentration camp name correctly first try.. lol
+2
level 41
Nov 7, 2015
Historians are by no means in consensus that Midway was the turning point of the Pacific theatre. It was A turning point, for sure, but arguable that it was THE turning point.
+2
level 49
Feb 25, 2018
well , the Japanese lost most of their ships and we took over a vital airbase how is that NOT the turning point in the US war against the Japanese? please defend your position
+1
level 57
Jun 6, 2018
The Battle of the Coral Sea was the first strategic setback for the Japanese and in my view was the turning point in the Pacific theatre during WWII. Midway was a more decisive setback, but in terms of turning the tide of the war, that had already started with the Coral Sea battle.
+1
level 74
Jun 6, 2018
I've only recently gotten interested in WW II history and am no expert, but it seems to me that although Japanese losses at the Coral Sea battle helped ensure success at Midway, it was the Japanese losses at Midway which gave parity to the two sides. That is why it is often credited as the turning point because it ended the threat of Japanese invasion. I'd say if any other battle could be said to be as important it would be Guadalcanal rather than Coral Sea.
+2
level 25
Nov 12, 2015
Aushwitz was one of the smallest concentration camps. The biggest was Treblinka, which is right next to Auschwitz...
+1
level 75
Jul 23, 2016
Treblinka was an extermination camp, not a concentration camp.
+1
level ∞
Jan 27, 2018
I just double-checked. The quiz is correct.
+1
level 65
Jun 6, 2018
I put Birkenau (is that the one you mean? - it's about 3 kms from Auschwitz) More people were killed there, perhaps less people held there? I guess it depends what one means here by "large." Or maybe Auschwitz stands in here for Auschwitz-Birkenau. Anyway, it's all gruesome.
+1
level 16
Nov 25, 2015
97%
+3
level 29
Mar 11, 2016
'Treblinka'....that sounds like ice cream.
+1
level 39
Oct 20, 2016
I thought the Japanese surrendered in August. Where does September come from?
+2
level 49
Feb 25, 2018
they surrendered on the USS Missouri on Sept 2nd 1945. they were given some time to think about the destruction we could do to all their cities with nukes and they choose to surrender.
+1
level 30
Jan 23, 2017
Panzer literally stands for "Armor", not "Tank". A "Tank" in German is "Panzerkampfwagen", which then literally means "Armored Combat Wagon".
+2
level 39
Feb 27, 2017
And, how, in the real world, would you shorten that, perhaps to PANZER? - Some people become supercilious, not to edify but to either create discord or demonstrate their "superior" knowledge. Get a Life, people!
+2
level 65
Apr 4, 2017
Eisenhower was not the only Supreme Allied Commander. Alexander was Supreme Allied Commander in the Mediterranean.
+1
level 39
Apr 18, 2017
There was only one SUPREME commander and that was Eisenhower. The only way he would accept the appointment was to be the SUPREME commander (too many cooks in the kitchen, etc...)
+3
level 65
May 23, 2017
No - they were both Supreme Commander, but in different areas. Putting SUPREME in capitals doesn't change that.
+1
level 39
Aug 4, 2017
Someone should, someday, look up the definition of "Supreme" - I believe that Webster terms it: Highest in power, authority or rank.
+1
level 65
Feb 24, 2018
Oh do please try to understand the point. I can't believe it's that difficult. Supreme Commands were not allocated by reference to semantic niceties but by operational necessity. There were TWO Allied Supreme Commands in Europe - responsible for DIFFERENT COMMANDS. Eisenhower was Supreme Commander in NW Europe. Alexander was Supreme Commander in Italy. There were also two Allied Supreme Commanders in Asia. If you think commands should have been determined by reference to a dictionary then it's probably a good job for the world in general that you had no say in the decision.
+1
level 39
Jun 6, 2018
No, commands should not be determined by the dictionary, but civilized people do refer to it for the definitions of words. Perhaps you should more often.
+1
level 65
Jul 8, 2018
So could we all. You could start with the word "cogent".
+4
level 66
Jan 29, 2018
Isn't there a honorary title for Stalin, like "fuhrer" or "duce"? Were the latter less authoritarian than the Soviet leader?
+3
level 34
Feb 23, 2018
USSR Secretary General? lol
+1
level 29
Jun 6, 2018
He was sometimes referred to as "boss"/"the boss", but he didn't have a catchy title like the fascists, at least to my knowledge
+3
level 34
Feb 23, 2018
More WWII trivia! This is too easy for me.
+3
level 57
Mar 16, 2018
I think it is more appropriate to say 'Soviet dictator' rather than 'Russian dictator'.
+1
level 31
Mar 22, 2018
1 / 10. Just Got __ Adolf Hitler; Can You Accept Adal Fitler? :). 'A German Submarine'. Never Ever Heard of It. How Can You Make An Answer Appear Like The Hints ; E.G | How Can You Make Project. Japan Has 41 Destroyers. Just Could Win Against North Korea. Why Do The French Call It: 'Dunquerque'. Calais Is Quit Close To Dunkirk. Why Do You Almost Everything. You Even Know Braces ( { } ) and My Favourite Video-Game [Minecraft]. Is Jetpunk Your Favourite Website. So Many Vocabulary Quizzes. Best Thing About Quizmaster Is:... Rank #1. Why Are There Quotation Marks Before and after 'Lightning war'. Cool Quiz tho :)
+1
level 49
Jun 6, 2018
I don't understand at least half of this post but I do love it.
+1
level 31
Mar 22, 2018
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________...
+2
level 64
May 1, 2018
I'd call this a general knowledge quiz rather than 'trivia'. These are not trivial matters.
+1
level 29
Jun 6, 2018
Was this updated/changed?
+1
level 56
Jun 6, 2018
Could you accept Oświęcim for Auschwitz seeing as it is the Polish name of the town/camp?
+2
level 37
Jun 6, 2018
Stalin was Georgian.
+2
level 68
Jun 6, 2018
"Soviet dictator" would be a better description anyway.
+2
level 65
Jun 6, 2018
Stalin was Georgian, not Russian. He was "Chairman of the Council of Ministers" of the USSR, a nation of 15 republics. Quizmaster knows this but it needs to be said.
+3
level 73
Jun 6, 2018
Stalin rose to power along with his gangster friends Lenin, etc in Russia, where they eventually assumed total control over the Soviet Union, which was on paper a union of equal republics but in reality was de-facto a new Russian empire.
"Soviet dictator" would be slightly more accurate, but "Russian dictator" is not inaccurate as "Russian" and "Soviet" at the time of WW2 were used synonymously.
+1
level 59
Jun 6, 2018
I agree that the use of “Russian” is okay, also considering that different nationalities of the Soviet Union had their own communist parties and leaders, and the Russian one was the most important and influential one. But as for the term “dictator”, I feel like “General Secretary”, “Premier” or even the Russian word for leader, “Vozhd” could be more suitable options. And yes, I am aware that Stalin only became Premier in 1941, but Soviet Union was hardly even in the war before that year. The use of Vozhd also has some problems as few people know the word, but if Hitler and Mussolini can have their titles in their native languages, I can’t see why it shouldn’t be the same for Stalin :)
+1
level 73
Jun 6, 2018
General Secretary of the Communist Party is a little wordy. And most English speakers have never heard the title "Vozhd" before. Not that they shouldn't, necessarily, but it's just the common convention.
+2
level 74
Jun 6, 2018
"Trivia"? That Hitler was the German leader? Then what would qualify as a WWII question that is not trivia?
+2
level 47
Jun 6, 2018
I feel like this could have used more Pacific War questions.
+1
level 15
Aug 11, 2018
Why is there nothing regarding the Eastern Front other than Stalin? Or anything regarding the Chinese front?