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Countries with the Highest Murder Rate

Can you name the countries that have the most murders per 100,000 people according to the UN?
Quiz by Micky2911
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First submittedSeptember 18, 2016
Last updatedJuly 24, 2019
Times taken24,664
Rating4.17
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Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
rate
country
#
61.8
El Salvador
3,942
57.0
Jamaica
1,647
56.3
Venezuela
17,778
41.7
Honduras
3,864
41.3
Lesotho
897
37.9
Belize
142
36.5
St. Vincent and the Grenadines
40
35.9
South Africa
20,336
34.2
St. Kitts and Nevis
18
30.9
Bahamas
122
rate
country
#
30.9
Trinidad and Tobago
420
30.5
Brazil
63,895
29.6
St. Lucia
53
26.1
Guatemala
4,410
25.6
Dominica
19
24.9
Colombia
12,237
24.8
Mexico
32,079
19.8
Central African Republic
913
18.7
Tuvalu
2
17.1
Namibia
388
+9
level 60
Apr 5, 2017
Taking this quiz from Belize :)
+9
level 40
Apr 8, 2017
Still better than Honduras :)
+14
level ∞
May 13, 2017
For perspective, here are the murder rates in some selected countries:

Russia - 9.5
United States - 3.9
United Kingdom - 0.9
Japan 0.3

+1
level 63
Sep 7, 2019
Last time I checked, the murder rate in the US was 5.30
+11
level 62
May 13, 2017
Also known as name as many American countries as you can, with some African countries.
+10
level ∞
May 14, 2017
There seem to be two "murder belts".
+2
level 68
Jul 21, 2017
I find that quite remarkable. I'm trying to figure out the correlation.
+4
level 53
Jul 21, 2017
I once read Asia is just as bad, but they don't keep track of statistics the same way and lot's of murders are not reported
+13
level ∞
Jul 24, 2019
I recently learned that the UK only reports murders that result in a conviction, which lowers their "murder rate" by a significant amount. I'd assume that most governments are monkeying with the numbers to a certain amount, although I am fairly confident that the US numbers are accurate.
+2
level 48
Sep 6, 2019
Maybe central American and Caribbean countries with a history of severe oppression - slavery, and oppression of the indigenous inhabitants by European colonizers. And likewise for southern Africa - Namibia and South Africa have a long history of oppression by the government.
+1
level 57
Sep 6, 2019
The number of convictions makes sense to use. If there is no conviction, how do you determine whether it was murder? Are there some countries that go by the number of people dead and are suspected to have been murdered?
+1
level 39
Sep 6, 2019
Well, there are people who are murdered and they have no idea who did it. So how does the conviction only for stats make sense to you? A few years ago a guy stabbed a clerk to death at a gas station and police posted the suspects pic on the news. The poor quality of the video didn't help ID the guy, and the case is still open. So, because there's no suspect arrested for the homicide, in your eyes, the murder never happened?
+1
level 57
Sep 8, 2019
I think that is an exception to the general rule (i.e. if the murderer could be identified beyond all reasonable doubt then there would be more than enough evidence to convict them). If somebody is found dead with no video footage of the death then you can only put a percentage on the probability that it was murder (as opposed to suicide, accidental death, etc.). Conviction rates are more objective in the sense that there is good documented evidence. And while it does bias the results towards countries that are successful at prosecuting criminals, the rates of people being "diagnosed" as murdered is biased towards countries that record that successfully, which is likely to have a large overlap.
+2
level 61
Sep 9, 2019
So if a body is found stabbed multiple times and that was the cause of death, it's not definitive that it was murder just cause there's no proof of someone doing it? I guess the person could've just fallen on a knife... repeatedly. Or maybe their intestines itched and they tried scratching them. This is just one example of many where a murder is quite clear, even if the perpetrator is unknown.
+5
level 67
Jul 21, 2017
Not just African, but distinctly southern African.
+2
level 42
Jul 21, 2017
Hahaha, I saw your comment first and I gussed, 7-8 countries will be there then. Wrong!
+5
level 76
May 13, 2017
"Death in Paradise" indeed.
+5
level 80
May 13, 2017
Surprising that Haiti doesn't make the list.
+7
level 68
Jul 21, 2017
They can't afford weapons in Haiti.
+11
level ∞
Jul 24, 2019
More likely murders just don't get recorded.
+2
level 70
May 14, 2017
I was naming the usual suspects before I had a head-slap moment and realized the smaller the better.
+1
level 67
May 15, 2017
Brazil goes against that rule, as does Mexico, South Africa, Venezuela, I think a better rule would be the South and Central Americas 17 of 22.
+4
level 67
Jul 21, 2017
Graph this along with Gini coefficients and you might see some pretty strong correlations.
+2
level 59
Jul 21, 2017
You, sir, are a genius!
+1
level 44
Jul 21, 2017
Gini Wijnaldum
+1
level 70
Jul 21, 2017
YNWA
+6
level 60
Jul 27, 2017
And countries that lie between the U.S. and the main source of cocaine in South America.
+12
level 69
May 14, 2017
I think that the murder rates in some of the poorer countries in Africa, as well as in other undeveloped countries like Papua New Guinea, are actually far higher than the official statistics. I think a lot of them just go unreported. Namibia, for example, is one of the most developed countries in Sub Saharan Africa, yet has one of the highest murder rates of all of Africa? I don't believe it.
+4
level ∞
May 14, 2017
I agree that this is probably true.
+3
level 78
May 15, 2017
About to type the same thing. I imagine there are a lot of countries in Africa and from the India Subcontinent west in Asia that aren't faithfully reported. Notable countries not on this list Congo, Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, Afghanistan, Syria. It may be that these countries are in more or less a state of war/anarchy that most of the deaths are considered casualties of war. According to the page linked as the source Afghanistan is a safer place than Argentina and Ethiopia. The Americas and Namibia south are stable and because of influence of the US and Western Europe are going to try to report accurate information.
+2
level 69
Jul 21, 2017
Yes, that's true too. Perhaps deaths in places like Afghanistan/Somalia could also be attributed to not only war, but also to terrorism rather than murder.
+1
level 69
Jul 25, 2019
Are war deaths not counted as murder? Technically killing someone in war is murder. So places like Syria and Yemen etc should be on this list?
+1
level 71
Aug 8, 2019
You can learn about these mysteries of methodology by following the link to the source. The specific type of killing required for this list is the legal definition of homicide, which removes suicide and war deaths (but not necessarily civil hostilities) right off the bat. The UNODC (UN Office of Drugs & Crime, which is the compiler of these data) also elected to exclude justifiable homicide (e.g. self-defense) and unintentional killings from accidents, even if negligence was involved. The UNODC is using a boatload of sources to compile their numbers, which are listed in the Wikipedia article; there’s also some info on which numbers are probably accurate, and which probably aren’t, although to get a beefier understanding you’d have to go to the (very beefy) methodology document from the UNODC.
+1
level 57
Sep 6, 2019
If you kill one man, it is murder. If you kill 5 million, it is a statistic.
+1
level 32
Sep 8, 2019
vomitingdiamonds, murder is the "unlawful" killing of another human being. In a country like Syria or Afghanistan, law is definitely a matter of perspective and you'll get a different answer depending on which side you ask.
+1
level 42
Jul 21, 2017
I was about to write the same thing as well, true indeed. Same goes for the suicide rates.
+1
level 45
Sep 7, 2019
I think you're probably right as well, but it is worth remembering that Namibia has a relatively small population, so this will affect the stats.
+1
level 69
May 14, 2017
Wow!
+1
level 65
Jul 21, 2017
Why so many murders in central America ? :O
+6
level 44
Jul 21, 2017
Drugs?
+1
level 69
Jul 21, 2017
Unfortunately, you're probably right in general. Latin American gangs are responsible for soooo many murders.
+1
level 58
Jul 21, 2017
There's a pretty good correlation between high temperatures and murder rates.
+2
level 67
Jul 22, 2017
I think it is more to do with lack of Law control, corruption, and failure of the authorities to punish the 'Top Cats' of drug production and distribution, poverty and unemployment, access to firearms, illiteracy and the Macho violence against women ...... just for starters.
+2
level 63
Aug 29, 2017
High temperatures? What about Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam... India, Australia?
+3
level 57
Sep 22, 2018
There may be a high correlation. This does not mean that the temperatures cause the murders.
+1
level 66
Nov 18, 2018
A very wise observation, TWM03. There may, of course, be a third factor that is correlated with both. Suggestions, please....
+2
level 57
Nov 23, 2018
Probably how rich the country is, I'm guessing. Hotter countries tend not to be in Europe, which is one of the richest parts of the world. As for why this would be true for other areas (i.e. the US and Canada are richer than Latin America, one of the most prosperous South American countries is Uruguay, etc.) I'm not sure. Maybe it's to do with how many people were in the places before colonisation versus how many colonists chose to stay there, being used to colder temperatures.
+1
level 56
Jul 21, 2017
Hot blood?
+1
level 70
Jul 21, 2017
Intentional murder is a choice. It has more to do with morals than DNA.
+1
level 53
Sep 6, 2019
Although being a more aggressive person tends to help with that.
+1
level 47
Jul 21, 2017
Go here for the opposite: http://www.jetpunk.com/user-quizzes/229194/countries-with-the-lowest-homicide-rate
+3
level 67
Jul 22, 2017
I thought for a moment it was going to be a ..... 'Numbers of Dead brought back to Life' quiz
+1
level 69
Jul 21, 2017
For highest murder rates outside of Africa or the Americas, try http://www.jetpunk.com/user-quizzes/170770/highest-murder-rate-countries-with-exceptions
+1
level 57
Jul 21, 2017
Try taking my quiz on cities with the highest murder rate: http://www.jetpunk.com/user-quizzes/156455/cities-with-the-highest-homicide-rates.
+1
level 70
Jul 21, 2017
Kinda makes you want to move to Central America, doesn't it?
+1
level 59
Jul 21, 2017
well, these times i'm so "proud" of being a brazilian
+1
level 44
Jul 24, 2017
All these Caribbean countries and I forget Africa oops c:
+2
level 44
Aug 2, 2017
I see...countries with high levels of segregation
+5
level 78
May 8, 2018
My experience with South and Central Americans has led me to believe that segregation and prejudice in those countries is more of an issue between the wealthy and the poor (it seems that most of them only have small middle class communities) than it is between races because most people are of mixed race. There are very few "pure" blood lines in any ethnicity. That has just been my experience. I don't claim to be any kind of authority on the subject. The poor are forced to take what they need in a system that is stacked against them and often it means resorting to violent measures.
+4
level 53
Feb 16, 2018
Interesting how almost all of these countries on here are either majority black or have large black minorities.
+5
level 76
Jul 26, 2019
If you're trying to be racist, why not just be frank about it? Your correlation is vague at best, anyway.
+3
level 53
Sep 6, 2019
You seem to see things kinda black and white. It's a fact that black people in general have higher testosterone rates hence why so many of them are good at sports. Having a higher rate of testosterone not always but often leads to higher aggression too. While one still can choose to be the type of person they want, having more aggression is very often something found in people who engage in violence and murder. I certainly don't think all black people act this way because there are good and bad people in every culture. In fact the kindest people I've ever met were locals living in Uganda when I went there. But there are certain good and bad traits more common in certain cultures than others and that's a fact, not my opinion. You need to learn the difference between facts and hate speech before you comment on here. Of course some of it is cultural too, hence why Somalia is more tribal than most African countries and such a mess. Bottom line, political correctness has gone way too far.
+1
level 57
Sep 6, 2019
Ironic that you accuse Brandy of seeing things "kinda black and white" when that's clearly how you are seeing people. "Black" isn't a well-defined category, particularly if you look at the whole world, and perhaps more importantly it is an arbitrary one, with pretty much no links to genetics and limited links to culture. You seem to be confusing "cultures" and genetics and then referring to your culture/genetics construct as race. You haven't really listed many objective facts and I don't see anyone accusing you of hate speech. If political correctness has gone too far then it is because of things other than it disagreeing with you.
+2
level 53
Sep 8, 2019
Your type of liberals are the ones who are so quick to point out injustices committed by white people, yet so reluctant to point out the ones other cultures have done. Such a double standard!
+1
level 53
Sep 8, 2019
@TWM03 Except that I'm talking about a fact not hate speech so perhaps it's not as ironic as you had first thought. When I say black I mean Sub Saharan Africans and their descendants and I think you knew that and yes they are a well defined group. I'm talking about BOTH culture and genetics sometimes separately which you clearly didnt seem to get. Liberals often say that race is a man made concept but the fact is those things that separate different races would have existed whether we as humans realized it or not. To say Sub Saharans and their descendants don't have higher testosterone rates is a either misinformed or a lie. It's a well known fact that that testosterone is why so many of them are athletes, one of the objective FACTS I did mention to support my claim.
+1
level 53
Sep 8, 2019
@TWM03 Your claims about what you said about me and my connection to political correctness going too far makes no sense and actually the first person who responded to me accused me of the possibility of expressing hate speech.
+1
level 53
Sep 8, 2019
@jiaozira No Liberia wasn't colonized by Europeans or the US. Singapore did very well for itself despite colonization. Yes the gulf states have lots of oil and yet so does Nigeria. Yet Nigeria didn't seem to manage to allow it to drastically improve life for most of its citizens. While the poverty rate went down there more people are still poor there. The same is true for oil rich Gabon, Angola, Equatorial Guinea and other Sub Saharan African countries with large oil deposits. The British and other Europeans left infrastructure in Africa like railroads when they left and yet most of it was neglected unlike most in its former colonial possessions in Asia and Latin America.
+4
level 64
Sep 6, 2019
Interesting how most of these countries are small nations that don’t have a lot of natural resources for the citizens to easily make a living off of, with all of them having undergone colonialism or imperialism by European nations that just extracted wealth with little regard to bettering the lives of the local inhabitants.
+3
level 53
Sep 6, 2019
Interesting how some like to blame all their problems on colonialism while downplaying their own peoples role in the problems they face. Not that colonialism was without injustices, but it's used too much as a blanket statement. Ethiopia and Liberia were never colonized and look at all the violence and poverty those two nations produced. By contrast Singapore, Brunei, Israel, the UAE and several other gulf nations were colonized by the British and look at how well they turned out.
+2
level 60
Sep 6, 2019
Liberia was colonised though... and Singapore and the Gulf countries are rich because of resources they can control. But through colonisation at least large scale infrastructure was built, at least in the British colonies, giving them an edge over some others.
+3
level 56
Sep 6, 2019
“Not that colonialism was without injustices” Haha, this guy...
+2
level 64
Sep 6, 2019
@gzx5 I agree that you can’t blame all of the world’s problems on imperialism, which is why I didn’t! Notice that I first mentioned the impact of unlucky geography (which is the most important factor), then followed it up with the unhelpful influence of imperialism. The reason that some countries are successful after liberation is that the colonizers chose to build up strong infrastructure and institutions in these colonies, which the locals are still able to utilize to their advantage once the colonizers have left. The reason that some countries are unsuccessful despite never being colonized is that they probably suffered geographically and technologically.
+2
level 64
Sep 6, 2019
I bet that it was quite difficult for Ethiopia and Liberia to better themselves through trade with their neighbors when they are completely surrounded by colonies that are just shipping wealth home to the “motherland.” Singapore and Brunei benefited from British investments to make them bustling port cities. The UAE was lucky enough to find that they owned large oil reserves in an age of global energy consumption. Israel mainly exists because of American arms sales. Very few of these benefits are afforded to the countries on this list.
+1
level 64
Sep 6, 2019
My main point is that (1) geography and (2) how the country faired during imperialist times have much more of an impact on the success of a country is than (3) the skin pigmentation of the locals. If you think that the latter is a more important factor, then I’d love to hear your argument.
+1
level 53
Sep 8, 2019
@djeedubbeljoe Right, because even though colonization created problems it was to blame for 100% of these countries problems despite tribal violence in many of them before and after the colonists were there. Kinda narrow minded of you to say.
+1
level 53
Sep 8, 2019
I know you didn't blame all their problems on imperialism and that's why I said some do. In regards to what you said about the post colonial period, the British and other Europeans did indeed build up their colonies before they left leaving things the newly independent nations could've used to their advantage but didn't. With respect to the geography thing, yes I know there are tropical diseases, mountains, deserts, and other geographical issues but again what about those countries with similar scenarios who did better in the post colonial period? What about Malaysia, Jordan, Brazil and Argentina? Also colonized by Europeans with geographical issues and yet they all managed to do better than pretty much every country in Sub Saharan Africa.
+1
level 53
Sep 8, 2019
@jiaozira No Liberia wasn't colonized by Europeans or the US. Singapore did very well for itself despite colonization. Yes the gulf states have lots of oil and yet so does Nigeria. Yet Nigeria didn't seem to manage to allow it to drastically improve life for most of its citizens. While the poverty rate went down there more people are still poor there. The same is true for oil rich Gabon, Angola, Equatorial Guinea and other Sub Saharan African countries with large oil deposits. The British and other Europeans left infrastructure in Africa like railroads when they left and yet most of it was neglected unlike most in its former colonial possessions in Asia and Latin America.
+1
level 53
Sep 8, 2019
"Singapore and Brunei benefited from British investments to make them bustling port cities.The UAE was lucky enough to find that they owned large oil reserves in an age of global energy consumption. Israel mainly exists because of American arms sales. Very few of these benefits are afforded to the countries on this list." Notice the trend that there are no African countries on this list though. In fact Argentina used to be a developed country despite previous colonization and yet. My point is while there are varying degrees of post colonial periods in different countries of the developing world, most countries Africa were at the bottom of the barrel. Afghanistan is one of the few worse off than MOST sub saharan nations due to war and tribalism. Plus, while Europeans worsened tribal conflict in Africa it was always there! Long before Europeans arrived many African tribes were constantly going to war with eachother. So in addition to colonialism, they had a part to play in their issues.
+1
level 53
Sep 8, 2019
Were Congo, Sudan, Angola, Mozambique, Mali, and Chad small nations? Plus, small is subjective. What would you define as a small nation?
+1
level 53
Sep 8, 2019
Do you know if it's a fact that European powers wouldn't allow any trade or just a very tiny amount of trade from their colonies in Africa to Ethiopia and Liberia? I'm talking about the testosterone rates in the people we call "Sub Saharans and their decendants" not the actual skin pigmentation they have.
+1
level 56
Feb 19, 2018
Only 4 outside the Americas
+2
level 71
Aug 7, 2018
The Caribbean has a surprisingly high murder rate. I knew Jamaica was really bad but I was surprised to see places like the Bahamas and St Kitts and Nevis.
+1
level 57
Sep 22, 2018
Um... Odd problem. The quiz description says upiogocfihcfuiduidudusuaeyalblhbolbhlbhl and the top three answers are sddjmdkda, sfa and Venezuelachdfhdf. I don't know what has caused this or if other people are seeing it but just thought I'd let you know @QM.
+1
level 57
Sep 22, 2018
Also the column headers are arqrara, gsjjsjsf, and igigddgi.
+1
level ∞
Sep 22, 2018
Weird! This has been fixed.
+1
level 71
Sep 6, 2019
sddjmdkda is a good answer, it's a pity it's no longer accepted
+1
level 57
Sep 6, 2019
The original name for sddjmdkda was Provincia De Nuestro Señor Jesus Cristo, sddjmdkda Del Mundo.
+1
level 76
Sep 6, 2019
I spent a summer in Venezuelachdfhdf once. It seemed perfectly safe.
+1
level 30
Feb 15, 2019
So basically northern South America, southern North America (the countries with drug routes going through them), plus southern Africa. Gotcha.
+1
level 45
Sep 11, 2019
These countries - the Latin American ones at least - also have some of the world's lowest suicide rates. It's an interesting contradiction, that less depressed people are more homicidal
+1
level 65
Apr 4, 2019
Curse of the Caribbean...
+3
level 39
Apr 29, 2019
Personally not a big fan of murder rates as a statistic for judging a country, especially if you have a country with a really small population. You could have one single murder and have the highest murder rate in the world for that year despite it being the first killing in that place for 10 years or something. These kind of figures also make some countries look incredibly dangerous but they don't take into account that a lot of the time it is gang related murders which tourists wouldn't necessarily get caught up in.
+2
level 58
Jul 25, 2019
15/20 From Latinamerica & the caribbean! I thought Jamaican people were very chill! I don't understand this :S
+2
level 47
Sep 6, 2019
We are. Unfortunately, gang violence is very high in the ghetto areas, and outside of the ghetto areas the murders we hear about the most are relationship related.
+3
level 62
Jul 25, 2019
The Lesser Antilles nations and Tuvalu are very misleading. They are considerably safe, with very low murder counts, but the sheer lack of people in those countries drastically inflates those nations' homicide rates to unbelievable numbers.
+3
level 79
Aug 27, 2019
But that's exactly the point of the "rate per 100,000 inhabitants". If you have a small population, 20 or 40 murders can be a lot. You'd only really have a valid argument for Tuvalu, which lands on this list with only 2 murders, which of course could be done in a single event by a single person and therefore skew the impression of relative safety. But St Lucia, for example, has only 165,000 people; 53 homicides is a LOT for that small of a place.
+4
level 70
Jul 27, 2019
If you kill each other all the time, name your country after a saint.
+1
level 71
Aug 8, 2019
One of the most interesting things I read that hadn’t even occurred to me was how much the state of trauma care in a country can skew results. For instance, you can get shot clean through the head in the US for instance and wind up making a full recovery because of the quality and availability of emergency medical care, but a schoolyard squabble in, say, Lesotho, might cause an infected puncture wound from a pencil that results in death. The caveats specifically say that the technical rate of homicides may not be an accurate indicator of a country’s general state of societal violence, although that’s usually what this data is used for.
+1
level 53
Sep 6, 2019
Why Namibia?
+1
level 67
Sep 6, 2019
Close to South Africa - cross-border organised crime. Also, hardly any people so high per-capita rate.
+2
level ∞
Sep 6, 2019
Poor enough to have a violence problem. Rich enough to accurately record murders that take place.
+1
level 53
Sep 8, 2019
Interesting. Of all the countries on this list, Namibia surprised me three most. I thought it was a pretty safe country but I guess not. I know next door Botswana is safer though.
+2
level 51
Sep 6, 2019
The likes of Iraq/ Syria/ Somalia would dwarf the Central American countries in murder statistics - they're just too poverty ridden to have a system that records all the crimes.
+1
level 76
Sep 6, 2019
They wouldn't
+1
level 57
Sep 6, 2019
Interesting that about 60% of the people on this list were murdered in Brazil.
+2
level 43
Sep 8, 2019
I missed Mexico, the most guessed one XD
+1
level 54
Sep 9, 2019
Once the people from these places overrun the West, you will see the same nonsense wreck our societies, unfortunately, despite all the PC open borders idiocy.