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Malapropisms Quiz

These phrases are incorrect. Type the word that should be used for the phrase have the intended meaning.
Malapropism: the mistaken use of a word in place of a similar-sounding one, often with unintentionally amusing effect
Quiz by Quizzer6794
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First submittedJune 6, 2015
Last updatedOctober 7, 2019
Times taken12,820
Rating4.01
3:00
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Malapropism
Correct Word
The city had to be evaporated
due to the large storm
Evacuated
I have a photogenic memory
Photographic
Everyone at the office has
their own cuticle
Cubicle
He's a wolf in cheap clothing
Sheep's
This vinegar is too Hasidic!
Acidic
Dancing the flamingo
Flamenco
Drake was the first Englishman
to circumvent the globe
Circumnavigate
Lead the way as we precede
Proceed
It's a mute point
Moot
Darwin is perhaps history's
most famous naturist
Naturalist
Malapropism
Correct Word
The facts that I eluded to earlier
Alluded
A crab is a crushed Asian
Crustacean
The court had wonton
disregard for the law
Wanton
That explanation doesn't jive
with the evidence
Jibe
He negotiated a constipation
package at his new job
Compensation
She felt ambiguous about the job offer
Ambivalent
The life of man is nasty, British, and short
Brutish
Wikipedia is a suppository of knowledge
Repository
The errors were exasperated
by poor communication
Exacerbated
This text is chalk full of mistakes
Chock
+4
level 72
Dec 2, 2015
You won't hear "jibe" used that way outside the United States.
+4
level 75
Dec 7, 2015
Agreed. Boo.
+1
level 71
Jan 19, 2016
Yes you will - or someone has mangled the expression
+5
level 51
Jan 19, 2016
I live in the US and have never heard of that word
+1
level 58
Jan 19, 2016
Agreed; I had no idea what word was wanted there. I knew it wasn't "jive", but I knew no other word that sounded remotely similar that could take its place.
+1
level 66
Jan 21, 2016
Yes you will. I'm British and have always known it to mean "to agree with" which is also what the dictionary says.
+2
level 70
May 21, 2017
People in the US who've never heard the word "jibe" have simply heard other people incorrectly using "jive". For at least 40 years (or more) I've known it was "jibe" and that it meant "to agree with".
+2
level 73
Dec 3, 2015
Hilarious quiz this one, chucked all the way through!
+1
level 59
Dec 4, 2015
Don't worry, I died too. I spent around 10 minutes actually reading the page below; was too busy cracking up. I got these from this site, it's funnier reading the full sentence.
+1
level 75
Dec 7, 2015
Yes. Very odd visuals :P
+1
level 72
Jan 19, 2016
Any chance of photoshopping a dancing flamingo into the picture of the señora?
+1
level 70
May 21, 2017
Yep, great quiz!!
+2
level 73
Dec 3, 2015
Today's quiz brought to you by George W. Bush.
+1
level 59
Jan 19, 2016
*Dubya
+5
level 66
Dec 3, 2015
Anyone else thinking of Joey's "moo point"? :D
+1
level 76
Dec 3, 2015
Yes.
+1
level 71
Dec 8, 2015
I thought exactly that when I got to that question. lol
+5
level 82
Dec 3, 2015
Shouldn't "depository" be accepted as well? - Great quiz otherwise, especially when you know exactly what the wrong word is, but can't think of the real one. The only one I really didn't know was "jive".
+1
level 79
Jan 19, 2016
Yes, I tried depository too. Since people are allowed to write articles and edit, I think depository should be accepted.
+1
level 69
Jun 23, 2018
+1
+1
level 56
Oct 6, 2019
Yes. I also tried depository.
+2
level 66
Dec 29, 2015
Too difficult for me as a Francophone... Got only 7/20 and zero point for that quiz..
+6
level 65
Jan 19, 2016
I'm just glad Drake didn't circumcise the globe!
+2
level 56
Oct 6, 2019
...in his 40 foot cutter.
+2
level 56
Jan 19, 2016
I heard Hiroshima was filled with crabs after the bomb. Super dark, sorry
+1
level 61
Jan 19, 2016
No offense, but I pity anyone who would make those mistakes.
+2
level 77
Jan 19, 2016
This is a good idea for a quiz but I think it could have been executed better. The large majority of these phrases are things I have never heard uttered. On the other hand... I have heard people say some of these things routinely:
chomping at the bit
hunger pains
I should of studied grammar
I could care less
etc etc... there are tons of these in very common usage. A quiz on the subject would be cool.

I've also heard about Drake circumcising the globe before... with a large clipper.
+1
level 72
Jan 19, 2016
Hunger pains is fine. Isn't it? (he asked with doubt creeping into his voice) Or have I malapropped my whole life on that one? And if all my mates say that too, which they do, how many malaproppers does it take before it becomes the new normal?
+4
level 76
Jan 19, 2016
I always thought it was hunger pangs.
+3
level 72
Jan 19, 2016
Oops, sorry. I remember now, Hunger Pains is the movie with the girl who shoots arrows and stuff.
+3
level 58
Jan 22, 2016
No, Hunger Panes is a movie about an unemployed glazier.
+1
level 77
Oct 6, 2019
It's pangs not pains that is the common expression.
+1
level 40
Oct 6, 2019
The movie is Hunger Games, lol
+1
level 59
Jan 19, 2016
Thanks, maybe a #2 would be nice.
+1
level 53
Mar 6, 2016
Check out the Eggcorn Database for ideas....it's a site devoted to hunting down this sort of thing.
+4
level 71
Jan 24, 2017
I don't think the point was necessarily to replicate phrases in common use (the term "malapropism" just as validly refers to a single word as it does to an entire phrase); I think the point was that Quizzer6794 wanted to see if he could MAKE US SPEW OUR BEVERAGES OUT OUR NOSES AND ALL OVER OUR SCREENS and give us asthma attacks from laughing hysterically! And may I just say, mission accomplished. The visuals that popped into my head (Darwin running around stark naked, jurors and court officers flinging around Chinese dumplings, a canine lupus wearing a gold lamé sweatsuit), or the realization that a couple are already true just the way they are (everyone in any office does have at least one cuticle of their very own, Wikipedia really *is* a suppository of knowledge) had me in friggin' STITCHES. Yes, please make more of these, Quizzer6794, but make them just like this one! I'm even inspired to try my hand at one. This was among my top 3 or so favorite JetPunk quizzes ever. Kudos!
+1
level 29
Jul 13, 2019
Agreed fully
+1
level 59
Oct 6, 2019
Really glad to hear it :D
+3
level 61
Oct 6, 2019
"I could care less" always really rankles me. There may also be an interesting quiz on expressions that were once wrong, but became correct through widespread usage, like "boldface lie," which used to be a malapropism of "baldface lie," or the word "momentarily," which means "for a moment," but is so frequently and incorrectly used to mean "in a moment" that its meaning has almost changed by consensus. By the dictionary definition, "I'll be with you momentarily" means "I'll be with you for a moment before I leave," but of course everyone understands it to mean "I'll be with you in a minute."
+2
level 31
Oct 6, 2019
If we're defining 'malapropism' as 'an act or habit of misusing words ridiculously, especially by the confusion of words that are similar in sound', then I wouldn't consider 'chomping at the bit' one of them. Probably more appropriate to think of it as an accepted variant of 'champing at the bit', since there's no substantial change in the idiom's meaning.
+1
level 50
Jan 19, 2016
I would think that "fandango" would be the more-commonly-intended word than "flamenco".
+1
level 47
Jan 19, 2016
agreed, however it's obvious what is needed. Flamenco is a style, Fandango is the dance.
+1
level 59
Jan 19, 2016
Dancing the Fandango?
+1
level 50
Jan 19, 2016
Sure, just as referred to in Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody or Bob Dylan's Romance in Durango.
+1
level 59
Jan 19, 2016
That's the joke of the song. Scaramouch, fandango, c'mon!
+2
level 52
Oct 12, 2018
and in Whiter Shade of Pale Procul Harum
+1
level 73
Sep 1, 2019
I'd have thought fandango was better than flamenco too. Can you dance 'the flamenco' anyway? It's a style whereas fandango is a dance so it fits the clue better.
+1
level 58
Jan 19, 2016
Fandango?
+2
level 79
Jan 19, 2016
Dancing your movie tickets away!
+1
level 76
Jan 19, 2016
I never heard the Brutish expression before. I looked it up, and I never heard of Hobbes or Leviathan, either. It sounds like dry reading material, but thanks for teaching me something new today.
+1
level 59
Jan 19, 2016
Always :)
+1
level 30
Jan 19, 2016
Could "ambitious" work instead of ambivalent for ambiguous, too? I get it that ambivalent is nearer to the malapro..priated (?) 'ambiguous' in meaning, but since this is not the case for the other words in that quiz (say constipation package), I don't see why it shouldn't work (unless, of course, it's gramatically wrong, in that case please ignore my suggestion, I'm not a native speaker). I could also see someone mistaking ambitious for ambiguous more easily than ambivalent, at least if you're going with the "similar-ish sounding, different meaning" theme like you did with the rest of the words. Ambiguous and ambivalent share a meaning (sort of), the rest of the words does not share a meaning, just some phonetic resemblance.
+1
level 53
Mar 6, 2016
I *am* a native speaker, and this was the only one I missed! I also tried "ambitious"... And she COULD have been "ambiguous" about a job offer, if she were the one offering a job to someone...I had no idea what was needed here. Not a complaint, just a comment.
+1
level 38
Jan 19, 2016
You forgot "Irregardless" when people either mean "regardless" or "irrespective". And "unthaw" for "Thaw". Good quiz though!
+1
level 29
Jul 13, 2019
Unthaw? People say that? Ouch
+1
level 65
Oct 6, 2019
Those aren’t actual words though, making them not malapropisms.
+3
level 49
Jan 19, 2016
We all know that Tony Abbott is the suppository of all knowledge
+1
level 58
Jan 19, 2016
Repository!
+1
level 58
Jan 19, 2016
Look at the malapropism!
+1
level 52
Oct 12, 2018
are you questioning Flutel ? clearly you are not Australian
+1
level 49
Feb 6, 2016
This reminds me of the Stop the Boats game. "No one is the suppository of all wisdom."
+1
level 49
Nov 5, 2016
I really should have posted the link... here it is: http://www.abbottsimulator.com/
+1
level 59
Nov 5, 2016
x50 :D
+1
level 44
Jan 20, 2016
This may be more relevant to a US audience so I won't complain too much... but form the UK, this was poor
+1
level 70
Jan 21, 2016
I kept thinking of the old Frank and Ernest comics while doing this one.
+1
level 57
Jan 24, 2016
I can not for the love of god spell repository
+1
level 57
Jan 24, 2016
PS: Is it bad that I put sadistic instead of acidic for the vinegar one at first?
+1
level 59
Jan 24, 2016
+2
level 58
Jun 1, 2016
Nearly ran out of time because I couldn't stop laughing! Crushed Asian.....
+1
level 55
Oct 6, 2019
lmao me too.
+1
level 15
Jan 15, 2018
2:16 left :P
+1
level 72
Jul 5, 2018
Wikipedia IS a suppository of knowledge.
+2
level 68
Oct 6, 2019
One you hear all the time: "calvary" for "cavalry".
+1
level 65
Oct 6, 2019
You should definitely add “He was a milk toast centrist candidate.” 😂
+2
level 67
Oct 6, 2019
A lot of gems here, but I've been told that Drake circumcised the globe.
+1
level 44
Oct 6, 2019
Couldn't depository work for the Wikipedia one as well?
+1
level 54
Oct 7, 2019
Liz: It's just that with Ed here, it's no wonder I always bring my flatmates out, and then that only exacerbates things. Shaun: What you mean? Liz: Well, you guys hardly get on, do you? Shaun: No, I mean, what does 'exacerbate' mean? Liz: Um, it means to make things worse.
+1
level 42
Oct 7, 2019
Now add one for Initialism vs acronym. This is one I see/hear people misuse the most often.
+1
level 39
Oct 7, 2019
This quiz reminds me of the days when I confused 'naturist' and 'naturalist'