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The U.S. Pledge of Allegiance

Type all of the words to the very famous USA Pledge of Allegiance which many school children are forced to recite.
Last updated: March 11, 2017
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Words
I
Pledge
Allegiance
to
the
Flag
of
the
United
States
of
Words
America
and
to
the
Republic
for
which
it
stands
one
Words
Nation
under
God
indivisible
with
liberty
and
justice
for
all
+1
level 69
Mar 11, 2017
Too much time. One minute would keep it interesting.
+2
level 68
Mar 13, 2017
Not everyone is american...
+4
level 49
Jul 24, 2017
You're right, there are commies out there.
+4
level 66
Jul 25, 2017
The commies not only know the pledge, they know more than one verse of the national anthem - that's how the CIA catches them.
+2
level 57
Mar 14, 2017
But it takes that one minute to spell indivisible!
+2
level 58
Jul 25, 2017
Fun fact: "indivisibility" is the only word in the English language with the same vowel repeated six times and no other vowels. Or maybe it's just the only word with the same vowel six times. You get the idea.
+2
level 77
Jan 12, 2019
Pretty sure the "y" at the end of indivisibility is a vowel . . .
+1
level 58
Jul 22, 2017
Not American, so I only got 11 by guessing, earning 0/5 points. If you're not American, it's unlikely you will get very many, regardless of time.
+1
level 49
Jul 23, 2017
I've never actually heard the pledge myself so the time limit was fine for me. I was pretty proud of myself for getting 17/31
+1
level 73
Mar 12, 2017
Waiting for the vehement pedantry about "Under God" not in the original...
+1
level 58
Jun 30, 2017
You bet. Clearly those who added it in the 1950s (out of fear of godless commies, no doubt) were unfamiliar with the first amendment. But I have to agree with the comment below, I think swearing allegiance to a piece of fabric is odd at best.
+1
level 59
Jul 23, 2017
I'm Canadian but may I just say that you are not 'swearing allegiance to a piece of fabric' but rather to what that 'piece of fabric'; as you call it, symbolizes. Personally when I see our Maple Leaf flying whether here in Canada or in other countries in front of our embassy or elsewhere, I am moved & proud to call myself Canadian. Aren't you proud to call yourself American?
+1
level 75
Jul 25, 2017
It's certainly worth pointing out, vehemently or not. Doing so is not pedantic.
+1
level 76
Mar 22, 2017
The whole "allegiance to the flag" thing is honestly the strangest thing about American culture (and it's a bit creepy too).
+2
level 57
May 17, 2017
And we see you are from England where eating spotted dick and big saucy bangers is acceptable. Yeah, that's not creepy?? I think it is fair to say every culture has something that foreigners view as "creepy", but most adhere to indoctrinating their peoples with some type of nationalism - God Save the Queen!!.
+3
level 58
Jun 30, 2017
Just the names of it are creepy (unless you're a 12 year old, then the names are hilarious). Otherwise, its just sponge cake with custard or sausages. Hot dogs, on the other hand...another disgusting American invention. ;)
+1
level 57
Jun 30, 2017
Arguing over strange cultures between America and Britain? That's pure "12 year old" behaviour.
+1
level 46
Jul 23, 2017
It was just something implemented to encourage a patriotic spirit within the American Youth during the Cold War. Whether or not if it's effective nowadays could be up for debate ;P.
+1
level 70
Jul 24, 2017
The Pledge of Allegiance has been around longer than that. When the State of West Virginia required all students to recite it in 1940, expelling students who refused to do so and prosecuting their parents, a number of Jehovah's Witnesses, who considered this to be a violation of their faith, because they viewed saluting the flag as worship of an image, sued the State. Their case made it up to the Supreme Court, where Justice Jackson, perhaps the finest writer to ever be named to the Court, upheld their challenge, writing "If there is any fixed star in our constitutional constellation, it is that no official, high or petty, can prescribe what shall be orthodox in politics, nationalism, religion, or other matters of opinion, or force citizens to confess by word or act their faith therein." Two justices dissented.
+1
level 47
Jul 22, 2017
When pledging allegiance to the flag, the flag is a tangible representation of the US. It is a rallying point. Patriots see it that way, as do flag burners. Whether the object of praise or scorn, it is the nation that is the object, with the flag being a means of expressing that emotion.
+1
level 65
Jul 22, 2017
Thank you, I'm glad someone made this point. We are pledging our allegiance to "the Republic for which [the Flag of the United States of America] stands - one nation..." The flag is a symbol and is seen as such by supporters of the U.S. as well as by dissenters.
+1
level 55
Jul 22, 2017
Exactly.
+1
level 38
Jul 22, 2017
Clap clap for me,I'm American and I got five wrong
+1
level 65
Jul 22, 2017
Nobody in the United States is "forced" to recite this pledge. We are not now, nor have we ever been a police state, despite what some radicals would wish for you to believe. You can bet that if you blatantly and publicly REFUSE to recite the Pledge, there will be some suspicious glances cast in your direction, but it is fundamentally against the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution to require ANY recitation of ANY declaration of allegiance by citizens or immigrants of ANY age. The ONLY exceptions are for immigrants becoming naturalized citizens, who must recite an altogether different OATH of allegiance, and military personnel, who recite a similar oath upon enlistment or commission into the American armed services. Please, please take great care in how you describe American rituals, regardless of how unappealing you may find them. The dissemination of misinformation from all parties really needs to stop.
+1
level 72
Jul 24, 2017
Yaaay, an intelligent comment!
+2
level 44
Jul 24, 2017
Whether or not you're not required to recite the pledge by law doesn't stop many schools from forcing all able-bodied children to stand, place their hands over their hearts, and recite the pledge. In some states, the state pledge. it may be illegal, but they still do it even in 2017
+2
level 58
Jul 25, 2017
einahpetxs is correct. The ACLU has taken up many cases in which teachers have tried to force students to recite the Pledge. The ACLU always wins because the law on the subject is clear, but one has to wonder how many seven- and eight-year-old kids simply do what their teacher says and recite the Pledge, based on the notion that the grownups make the rules.
+1
level 78
Jul 22, 2017
I always hated standing up and saying this pledge when I was in school, because there's really no point. Thankfully I didn't go to a school where people would probably have been offended if I didn't stand up.
+1
level 37
Jul 23, 2017
Got 17 from guessing, never heard of this before. I'm English, and we had to recite the Lord's Prayer every morning, even though my school was not Christian
+1
level 43
Jul 23, 2017
For the editors: Please don't say "forced" - foisting your opinion of the Pledge onto the quiz offering is churlish and petty. For those who hated standing up, hated reciting it: bully for you - being an American citizen affords you that right. Just keep in mind that an integral part of being a US citizen means recognizing you have responsibilities too. If you find the Pledge that onerous, you probably aren't up to the challenge and should seek citizenship elsewhere.
+1
level 57
Jul 23, 2017
The instructions originally had a different message. And anyway, it's a light-humoured joke :)
+1
level 50
Feb 22, 2019
They are forced.
+1
level 43
Jul 24, 2017
Non-american and it took me 35 seconds to get the whole thing....I have absolutely no idea how or why I know it though.
+1
level 51
Jul 24, 2017
There is one word that the majority of the people forgot about in the past election. That was Republic. We are not a democracy. We are a Democratic Republic.
+1
level 58
Jul 25, 2017
Actually, in the United States, it is referred to as a republican democracy. The difference may only be semantic (although certainly not if you ask a lawyer), but the noun is "democracy."
+1
level 48
Jul 26, 2017
You have that backwards. The United States is a Democratic Republic. Thus the electoral college, and allocation of Senators based on state boundaries and not population, as well as voting bodies making the decisions in place of mob rule. Pure Democracy was one of the greatest fears of the founding fathers as it inevitably results in the majority subjugating the minority.
+1
level 50
Feb 22, 2019
The latest thing is for the alt-right to rearrange the order to "Republican democracy". LOL. Also a favorite of trolls.
+1
level 13
Jul 24, 2017
I got 18 xD ngl, I'm quite proud of that considering I'm fromt the UK
+1
level 58
Jul 25, 2017
Does anyone know how uniformly children are still asked to do this in grade school? I know we had to do it everyday when I was in school, but it's been a while. In retrospect, it does seem an odd to ask of young children...
+1
level 52
Jul 26, 2017
They still ask us to recite the pledge every single day in school, and they also did in when I was in elementary and middle school. However, I rarely stand up and recite it, and I have never encountered any negative consequences for this.
+1
level 53
May 4, 2018
Some people frown upon it, but that's really it.
+2
level 67
Aug 4, 2018
Whatever happened to the straight armed Hitler salute kids used to have to give the flag when reciting this?
+1
level 50
Feb 22, 2019
It was too on the nose