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Elements by Picture Quiz

Can you name each element by a picture commonly associated with it?
Quizmaster note: This quiz requires common sense. Don't be a whiner!
The answers must correspond to the highlighted yellow box.
Click an image to see a larger version and for attribution
Quiz by Stewart
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First submittedMarch 8, 2018
Last updatedMarch 22, 2018
Times taken14,579
Rating4.16
2:00
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 / 16 guessed
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+1
level 69
Mar 8, 2018
I don't think there is any mercury in that thermometer.
+4
level 55
Mar 8, 2018
I've updated that picture as well to be clearer! Pretty confident this one actually has mercury in it.
+2
level 57
Jan 4, 2019
Either way it is still strongly associated with it
+8
level ∞
Mar 8, 2018
Great idea!
+6
level 60
Mar 22, 2018
I though the lightbulb would be argon
+3
level 55
Mar 22, 2018
The majority of old filament light bulbs use tungsten filaments in the middle of them, not sure about argon.
+3
level 62
Apr 3, 2018
I have heard most of the old ones are gone.
+1
level 83
Mar 22, 2018
My first guess was argon. Argon is inert and used in some bulbs to prevent oxidation of the filament. Other bulbs use a vacuum to void the bulb of oxygen.
+3
level 76
Mar 22, 2018
Correct. Smaller bulbs typically have a vacuum; bigger ones usually are filled with an inert gas such as argon - in the US at least.
+1
level 72
Mar 23, 2018
+1 argon
+5
level 71
Mar 23, 2018
My first guess was tungsten, never thought of anything else. I,d never heard of argon being used in light bulbs before.
+4
level 67
Mar 30, 2018
Tungsten is the filament that glows, Argon is used as a gas inside the bulb.
+1
level 52
Apr 22, 2018
Me too.
+2
level 76
Mar 22, 2018
That's the Grohnde nuclear power plant, and it uses both uranium and plutonium. (Environmentalists weren't too happy about the latter.)
+1
level 55
Mar 22, 2018
Plutonium will now be accepted also, once it's been reapproved :)
+7
level 83
Mar 23, 2018
Were environmentalists happy about the former?
But really, are environmentalists ever happy?
+4
level 67
Apr 21, 2018
I, for one, am confident that the relevant authorities around the world will operate nuclear power plants safely, including protecting them from earthquakes, floods, wars, and all other natural and social disasters, and will store radioactive materials in ways that won't cause any problems in the 500,000 years or so it will take for that waste to be safe. I can't really see what could go wrong.
+2
level 77
Nov 30, 2018
Our opinions about nuclear power have no bearing whatsoever on the answer to a quiz question.
+1
level 76
Aug 12, 2019
Even factoring in the worst nuclear disasters in history, and using the most liberal estimates for casualties from Chernobyl, etc., nuclear power has still killed fewer people and done less damage to the environment than coal or oil.
+4
level 69
Mar 22, 2018
May you accept Wolfram for tungsten?
+1
level 83
Mar 22, 2018
That makes sense, since the symbol for Tungsten is W (for Wolfram).
+1
level 55
Mar 22, 2018
Have added as a type in once it is reapproved!
+1
level 57
Apr 25, 2018
or Natrium for Sodium in that case...
+1
level 81
Mar 22, 2018
A very cool quiz!
+3
level 73
Mar 22, 2018
I totally typed Chrome as a joke. Thanks for accepting it. :-)
+1
level 57
Apr 23, 2018
Haha! That's funny!
+1
level 58
Mar 23, 2018
why uranium??? I could only see grass, concrete and water there...
+2
level 71
Mar 23, 2018
Probably because the majority of nuclear power plants such as the one depicted are commnly known to use uranium :).
+2
level 66
Apr 21, 2018
But that's the thing. Looking at that picture, all I could see are a couple of cooling towers, which are not exclusively used in nuclear plants but in other types of power plants and factories as well. Didn't cross my head at all that it was a nuclear plant. I kept thinking of water vapor, which isn't an element, so I started typing air elements like Oxygen and Nitrogen. It's either I am extremely delusional or that clue needs a more specific picture.
+3
level 66
Apr 21, 2018
HatemAli: you are extremely delusional.
+1
level 28
Oct 15, 2018
My first thought was sulphur due to scrubbing it from the emissions of coal plants using electrostatics, but got it in the end.
+3
level 58
Apr 21, 2018
Hatemali sounds like you’re in the minority of people who couldn’t figure out that this was supposed to be a nuclear power plant
+2
level 67
Apr 21, 2018
Maybe if it was a picture of Homer at work?
+2
level 67
Apr 22, 2018
How about a picture of a Uranium mine with a big sign saying URANIUM and a miner holding a lump of uranium with a big arrow pointing at it.
+1
level 57
Jan 4, 2019
you could make that majority, because only 48% got it right.
+1
level 68
Aug 11, 2019
Those cooling towers looks exactly like the coal fired power plants in the Latrobe Valley near where I live in Australia. It is a bad pictorial clue because the cooling towers are not unique to nuclear plants. Go and look up pictures of the Yallourn coal powered plant I'm talking about if you don't believe me.
+2
level 70
Mar 23, 2018
very fun quiz. thanks
+1
level 71
Mar 23, 2018
The wrench one took me until the last seconds, and then I felt dumb that it took me so long.
+5
level 71
Mar 23, 2018
The pool threw me for a bit, as H2O is a compound and neither hydrogen nor oxygen worked.... When I clued in I felt really stupid, lol. Great quiz idea!
+1
level 77
Mar 23, 2018
Don't feel too bad. I did the same thing.
+1
level 56
Apr 22, 2018
Did it as well...
+1
level 72
Mar 23, 2018
Nice quiz!
+2
level 70
Mar 24, 2018
I'm liking these "by picture" quizzes! Great idea! Keep em coming.
+1
level 71
Apr 2, 2018
Was trying to think of an element connected with cooling towers and going through various pollutants. Any chance you can make the picture more specifically nuclear?
+1
level 67
Apr 21, 2018
THAT was meant to be a nuclear power plant? How about a picture of a nuclear bomb instead?
+1
level 37
Mar 2, 2019
Well nuclear bomb would be Hydrogen since they are called Hydrogen Bombs, Nuclear plants use Uranium but that doesn't mean everything with Nuclear in it uses Uranium
+1
level 44
Apr 21, 2018
I knew over half of them, but I didn’t know what they are in English.
+1
level 43
Apr 21, 2018
I thought for sure the "light bulb" answer had to be phosphorus. I kept trying different spellings of that, instead of trying to think of other potential answers. Oops.
+2
level 39
Apr 21, 2018
16/16 with 29 sec left; I get the symbolism but there is no lead in the 'lead' photo, while the PTFE joint tape spool shown represents fluorine
+2
level 39
Apr 21, 2018
Let's have a contest for which photo represents the most different elements. I vote for the saltshaker: sodium, chlorine; silicon, oxygen (silicon dioxide) in the glass which may also contain boron and calcium; iron, carbon, vanadium, molybdenum, chromium may all be in the stainless steel cap
+1
level 31
May 22, 2018
I agree. I might even put chlorine as another answer for salt, since it has the same amount of sodium and chlorine atoms in each compound.
+2
level 67
Apr 21, 2018
For the last one I had to remind myself that Pentium isn't actually an element.
+1
level 57
Apr 21, 2018
I tried Pentium, too, even though it is a 486. Pentium, of course, was the trade name for what would have been the 586.
+1
level 57
Apr 21, 2018
I feel like for the picture of table salt, both Sodium and Chlorine should be accepted, as it is NaCl (Sodium Chloride), with an equal molar ratio of 1:1.
+2
level 45
Apr 22, 2018
I really typed Hydrogen and Oxygen in the swimming pool one.
+1
level 57
Apr 22, 2018
I guessed sulfur for carbon!
+1
level 67
Apr 23, 2018
Is it difficult for the British people to spell aluminum?
+1
level 75
Jul 17, 2019
I suspect not. Generally speaking, they usually spell it like the rest of the world outside the US: aluminium. (Except for US scientists, who tend to spell it aluminium also.)
+1
level 68
Aug 13, 2019
IUPAC adopted aluminium as the standard international name for the element in 1990. The rest of the world are just waiting for the US (and Canada) to catch up.
+1
level 57
Apr 23, 2018
I could only think of copper pipes.
+1
level 75
Jul 17, 2019
Better for your health :)
+1
level 54
Apr 23, 2018
Lead. *face palm*
+1
level 57
Apr 24, 2018
missed opportunity to use a more creative picture for silicon...
+1
level 61
Apr 25, 2018
You should put an image of Silicon Valley for the Silicon ;-)
+2
level 49
Apr 25, 2018
I kept putting in "Plutonium" for the banana picture but then I realized that only happens in Back to the Future 2.
+1
level 36
Apr 25, 2018
That's really the best clue you could find for aluminium? A grey globule?
+1
level 31
Apr 28, 2018
Sodium and chlorine didn't work for me
+1
level 62
Oct 15, 2018
For the pipes, could copper also be accepted, as copper is probably a more common material for pipes now?
+2
level 55
Oct 15, 2018
I'm going to say no, primarily because Copper pipes are, well, Copper in colour. The pipes shown here are very different from copper piping. Sorry.
+1
level 57
Jan 4, 2019
got all instantly without a second of thought, ok lead cost me half a second, was huh owyea... but the uranium one, looked at it for allmost a minute, thought it was about the clouds/smoke or something. Took me a long while to realize it is supposed to be a powerplant and the element itself isnt seen in the picture.
+1
level 63
Feb 3, 2019
Never got the chains because I thought “Isn’t it oxygen that causes rust?” and never got back to it.
+1
level 75
Jul 17, 2019
Fun quiz! Would you be so kind to add the standard note that elements must correspond to the yellow box? I use a blue blocker and I didn't know it was there until I was halfway through and couldn't understand why my answers weren't working :P
+1
level 55
Jul 18, 2019
Added, thanks :)
+1
level 69
Aug 12, 2019
Good quiz. You could add some other interesting ones: Krypton (planet), hydrogen (Hindenburg), nitrogen (Earth's atmosphere), oxygen (scuba tank), tin (can), silver, sulfur (geyser or hot spring), etc.