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Early Christian History

Based on the clues, give the correct answer.
Last updated: July 24, 2012
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Hint
Answer
Jewish rabbi, founder of the Christian faith
Jesus of Nazareth
First person to see above after Resurrection (according to Gospels of Mark and John)
Mary Magdalene
Founder's "Rock", denied his master
Peter
Brother of above, also an Apostle
Andrew
Apostle who, according to tradition, traveled to India
Thomas
Former persecutor turned missionary and writer of most of the New Testament
Paul
First Christian martyr, stoned to death
Stephen
City in which followers were first called Christians
Antioch
Island on which St. John wrote Revelation
Patmos
Disciple of St. John, Bishop of Smyrna, matyred by burning at the stake
Polycarp
Hint
Answer
Third (or fourth) Bishop of Rome, wrote an Epistle to the Corinthians, martyred by drowning
Clement
Disciple of St. John, Bishop of Antioch, wrote seven epistles on orthodoxy and obedience, martyred in the arena by wild beasts
Ignatius
"Father of Latin Christianity", discouraged Greek learning, formulated idea of the Trinity
Tertullian
Third and fourth century theologian, wrote first comprehensive history of the Church
Eusebius
Bishop in modern-day Turkey, patron saint of children
Nicholas
Council in which the issue of the Trinity was clarified, produced a well-known statement of belief
Council of Nicaea
Doctor of the Church, wrote Confessions and City of God
Augustine
Doctor of the Church, translated the Bible into Latin
Jerome
Collection of heresies that asserted the body and material world were inconsequential or evil
Gnosticism
Heresy that asserted that the Son was not coequal to or coeternal with the Father
Arianism
+1
level 27
May 12, 2013
How can it be a heresy to claim the son is not equal to the father when jesus himself, supposedly, said things like no one knows the hour except the father, and those places are reserved by my father. Seems like Tertullian is the one who claimed Jesus was equal to his father. Jesus certainly never did, according to what today's christian's use as their bible. And oh yes. I know how crazy some of you are. You think youre defending god or jesus' honor when really they look down and pity you for your arrogance. If you believe, then God will judge you according to how you judge others. So be careful what you wish for.
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level 59
May 14, 2013
First of all, this is a trivia site, so it's not really the place for a theological disputation. Secondly, Arianism is considered a heresy because it fits the definition of heresy, which is a deviation from standard doctrine. Whether Orthodox, Catholic, or Protestant, Christians have agreed for about 1700 years that the Son is God and coequal and coeternal with the Father (see the Nicene Creed). Similarly, Arians (e.g. modern-day Jehovah's Witnesses) would consider those who believe Christ is divine to be heretical. Finally, there are actually a number of scriptural references where Jesus asserts his divinity. If you want to discuss this further, I'll send you my email address.
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level 75
Sep 8, 2013
"standard doctrine" is a moving target, though. Heretic just means someone who disagrees on a point of theology with whoever is using the term. In early Christian history, which the quiz claims to be about, it most certainly was not established or standard that god and Jesus were the same being, or equal in power. Pointing to one part of the Bible that seems to back up your claim doesn't really mean anything because almost without question there will be other parts that refute whatever point you are making. The document is rife with contradiction. Which leads to discussions like this one.
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level 59
Sep 9, 2013
Please read my comment carefully. I fully accede that standard doctrine can be a moving target since I noted that modern Arians consider trinitarian doctrine heretical. Regardless, as I noted above, the doctrine of the Trinity was established at the Council of Nicea nearly 1700 years ago. So yes, to assert that the Son is not coequal to the Father is and has long been considered heresy by the Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox branches of Christianity.
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level 75
Dec 29, 2013
okay, but 1700 years ago is still 300 years after the start of "early Christian history."
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level 38
Mar 30, 2017
That assertion about Jehovah's witnesses is NOT true. They fully believe that Jesus Christ is Divine, but that his Divinity is sub- ordinate to that of Jehovah, the Almighty God.
+1
level 75
Sep 8, 2013
Got about half of these, in spite of some of the clues being a little iffy. Others I knew but blanked on, including the island question which just came up in a front page quiz a few days ago. Some I wasn't sure about. Much harder than most of the religion quizzes on the site.
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level 59
Sep 9, 2013
Which questions had "iffy" clues? Just wondering . . .
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level 75
Dec 29, 2013
oh man... it was months ago that I left this comment, and only just now that I came back here. I don't really remember.
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level 39
Dec 22, 2014
This is why religion causes so many arguments and wars. Each one thinks they are right, when it is just stories passed down over the centuries.
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level 59
Dec 23, 2014
None of the controversies described above led to any wars. In addition, almost all of the books of the New Testament were completed within the first fifty years after Christ's earthly ministry- within the lifetimes of the apostles. The Gospel of John was completed later, but few serious scholars, even secular scholars, will date it later than 150 AD or so.
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level 39
Dec 23, 2014
I wasn't saying the controversies above actually caused wars; just that, in general, when each religion believes they are right, fanatics take it the extreme.
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level 75
Dec 31, 2014
Can you imagine if one of the earliest accounts we had of the life of someone who died in 1850 was a book without any citations written today? And then people would swear that every word of it was true and that it must have been written by that person's contemporaries. And refuse to even acknowledge serious scholarly study into inconsistencies or inaccuracies in this account? Even these days, in the information age when record keeping is an obsession, people would find such conviction in the account's veracity very strange.
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level 38
Jun 21, 2017
The Council of Nicea, consisting of men, whether established 1700 years or 17,000 years ago, does not trump the word of Jesus himself, who denied being co-equal to the Father; e.g. - if equal, exactly who was Jesus praying to in the garden when the Roman came to arrest him?
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level 12
Sep 15, 2017
My answers were correct but they weren't accepted... :[