-É Vocabulary Words

Can you guess these vocabulary words that all end with either "-é" or "-ée"?
e.g. "an afternoon performance" is a "matinée"
It is not necessary to type the accent in your answer
Quiz by ThirdParty
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Last updated: April 7, 2020
First submittedNovember 7, 2012
Times taken15,858
Rating4.21
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Definition
Answer
a coffee shop
café
a document used by job-hunters
résumé
a person engaged to be married
fiancé
a dish served before the main course,
or in the U.S. the main course itself
entrée
said by a fencer to acknowledge a hit
touché
to fry food in a small amount of fat,
and typically shaking the pan
sauté
a confused fight at close range
mêlée
a lack of experience or judgment
naïveté
a food made of liquefied vegetables
purée
an overused phrase or expression
cliché
a person supported by a mentor
protégé
Definition
Answer
a type of sword similar to a foil or rapier
épée
a sculpting material made of paper pulp
papier-mâché
a diplomatic officer, or his briefcase
attaché
a type of Japanese rice wine
saké
a spread made of finely chopped meat
pâté
unimpressed due to jadedness
blasé
a publication of scandalous facts
exposé
a dish made of beaten egg whites,
baked until puffed up
soufflé
slightly suggestive of sexual impropriety
risqué
a formal evening party
soirée
to cook by covering in flaming alcohol
flambé
+2
Level 57
Oct 29, 2012
Loved this quiz!
+1
Level 44
Jan 15, 2013
Pretty cool quiz
+1
Level 29
Jan 15, 2013
Awesome quiz!
+1
Level 73
Jan 15, 2013
Brilliant.
+1
Level 73
Jan 15, 2013
Great Work
+1
Level 72
Apr 13, 2013
fun quiz
+1
Level 67
Oct 13, 2013
Where is pokémon?
+4
Level 49
Oct 15, 2013
It doesn't end in "-é".
+2
Level 55
Jan 28, 2014
Isn't an entrée a starter, or at least before the main course? In the name isn't it?
+1
Level 49
Jan 28, 2014
200 years ago, yes. Today, no. Word meanings evolve in funny ways sometimes.
+1
Level 55
Jan 29, 2014
Never mind, I checked, it's just another American/British English thing.
+3
Level 38
May 13, 2014
Entree is before the main in every English-speaking country outside North America.
+2
Level 74
Jun 11, 2014
Yes, in most countries the entrée is what Americans call the starter!
+2
Level 73
Sep 25, 2015
It's still the first course in France, between Apéritif and the "first plate of the main course" (sorry, don't know how to say it properly but there is two main courses in French formal dining, before salad and cheese :)
+3
Level 63
Sep 25, 2015
To me, using "entree" to mean a main just sounds insane. You learn something new every few days.
+4
Level 55
Mar 12, 2014
All, Be careful. These definitions are US/UK definitions, not french definitions. ;) Except "saké" all words are french words but with US/UK meaning. :)
+1
Level 59
May 4, 2014
anyway, they're always either the exact definition or something very close to the French meanings of those words.
+2
Level ∞
Jul 8, 2015
This is an English language quiz, not a French quiz.
+4
Level 80
Sep 25, 2015
Still, it's interesting to explain the original french meanings. The differences are risqué -> risky ; exposé -> report or lecture ; entrée -> starter ; resumé -> abstract (noun).
+4
Level 80
Sep 25, 2015
Oh, and the example that you give is interesting as well. in French, matinée and soirée are generic words that respectively mean morning and evening. Anyway, an afternoon performance is indeed called "matinée", in opposition to evening performances, called "soirée". An evening party is also called "soirée". So the english acceptations of those words are "correct" though only retaining specific meanings.
+4
Level 80
Sep 25, 2015
More generally, words ending with "é" in French are most of the time past participles which have become nouns. On the other end, a final "e", without accent, usually marks the feminine form. So, for example, entrée is the feminine past participle of entrer, our verb for "to enter". It has become a noun, generically meaning "entrance"... so an "entrée" would logically be the "entrance" of the meal and thus a starter.
+3
Level 80
Sep 25, 2015
The other words which are past participles are : résumé -> summarized ; fiancé -> engaged ; touché -> touched or felt ; sauté -> jumped ; mêlé(e) -> mixed, blended ; protégé -> protected ; mâché -> chewed ; attaché -> attached/tied/fastened ; blasé -> bored ; exposé -> exhibited ; soufflé -> blown ; risqué -> risked ; flambé -> blazed
+5
Level 48
Sep 25, 2015
I still wonder how "é" appears in Japanese word like saké.
+6
Level 80
Sep 25, 2015
it doesn't
+2
Level 63
Sep 25, 2015
Sake inconsistently appears with both the accent and without in English but in Japanese it's a non-issue since their hiragana "alphabet" has only one way to pronounce each vowel sound. Not even IPA pronunciation uses the accent.
+5
Level 72
Oct 31, 2016
It isn't really appropriate there, and is possibly a case of hyperforeignism. In standard Japanese transliteration the 'e' is unaccented, because as others have said, there is no need given the consistency of Japanese pronunciation. In this case it misleads people into thinking the 'e' is pronounced like the 'e' on the end of 'café' (though I've also heard it pronounced 'ee'), when it fact it should rhyme with the central 'e' in 'net'.
+4
Level 67
Aug 28, 2017
It's so that English speakers won't pronounce it the same as the English word sake.
+1
Level 76
Jan 24, 2018
so... for goodness sake, don't accent sake?
+1
Level 58
Sep 25, 2015
could "double entendré" work alongside "risqué"?
+3
Level 80
Sep 25, 2015
No, there is no accent on "entendre", it is a verb that usually means "to hear" and sometimes "to understand". So, "double entendre" means that a sentence has two meanings. However, I have to point out that "double entendre" is not correct French and that you will never encounter it in our language, we rather say "sous-entendu" or "double sens".
+1
Level 70
Sep 28, 2015
And a sous-entendu is more like reading between the lines. Bartender, I'll have an entendre. Make it a double.
+1
Level 67
Apr 19, 2020
yea it ends with a -druh sound not -dray which is how it would read ending in -dré
+2
Level 58
Sep 25, 2015
"unimpressed due to jadedness" made me think of a word you missed. Not "unimpressed" but "unimpressive", and due to something's time being over.
+1
Level 67
Apr 19, 2020
I too thought that something was blasé ( I have often heard tha'ts so blasé" and no I don't mean passé or cliché) and not the person that was unimpressed about it. I would have suggested something like unimpressiveness due to overuse. (time over woúld be passé) But it seems that is incorrect, first I thought it might only be this way in english, but apparently in my only language aswell. Can find all sorts of references about being bored and not enthusiastic, but not that something is boring. So it seems it is indeed about the person and not the things that bores them.
+1
Level 68
Sep 25, 2015
Should you also accept "passe" in addition to "cliche"?
+1
Level 67
Apr 19, 2020
Passé is more like has-been, out-dated, not necessarily used to death, cliché is something used so often you are very tired of it (which could have happened in a short or longer time period)
+2
Level 63
Sep 25, 2015
Thank you Final Fantasy VI for teaching me epee when I was but a youngling.
+2
Level 78
Sep 25, 2015
Great quiz. More difficult than I thought it would be.
+1
Level 72
Oct 17, 2016
Another awesome quiz, ThirdParty!
+3
Level 65
Jul 4, 2017
Could you please accept just "mache"?
+1
Level 73
Nov 3, 2017
Could "osé" also work for the "risqué" clue? Or is it not used in English?
+1
Level 81
Nov 28, 2018
Can we get Mueller to indict MacDonald's for frappé while he's at it?
+1
Level 67
Apr 19, 2020
Missed protegée purée, risqué and naïveté (fittingly ;) ).

Not too bad but it was still hard, my mind was go back and forth and thinking in three languages at once! French, English and my own. Sort of fries your system haha. And makes you miss something obvious like purée... somehow I think I read fruit and couldnt get smoothies out of my head haha.

Also was stuck on trainee for protegé. Once your mind is on a certain track, it is hard to get out of it. (well it went to page and pupil but that didnt help..)

And too naïve for the risqué one ;)

+1
Level 66
Apr 19, 2020
Fiancé is technically not a 'person' engaged to be married. With only one e at the end, it's a male engaged to be married. Females - including in English - are spelt 'fiancée'. The clue ought to be changed to 'A man engaged to be married'.
+1
Level 52
Apr 19, 2020
Quite easy for a French guy I may say. Even if some meanings are different from the French, I just guessed the closest one.
+1
Level 50
Apr 19, 2020
Very clever and interesting quiz. The surprising thing is the interesting and informative comments. I rarely read the comments because of the snarky nature of some of the commentators. It's too bad some people who enjoy challenging quizzes can sound so banal in their comments. But here I learned things and did not feel put down. Good job, gang!
+1
Level 45
Apr 19, 2020
I missed purée... Because I can't see it as liquefied. Is it liquefied in english ? Seems weird. I'd call it mashed. I swear I tried every fancy soup-type thing I know of x) consommé, velouté, ... i already forgot what else exists.
+1
Level 56
Jun 20, 2020
I agree - I think mashed would work better in the description than liquefied. I got it in the end but for the longest time I was thinking of soupy or smoothie like things. If it sticks to a spoon and keeps its shape then I don't think of it as a liquid.
+1
Level 43
Apr 19, 2020
Please accept the feminine form fiancée as a typein for the masculine fiancé :-p
+1
Level 60
Apr 19, 2020
but doesn't typing fiancee fill in fiance...
+1
Level 65
Apr 19, 2020
I've always known the word by the spelling 'naïvety'.