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Spell Check #3

Identify the misspelled word in each sentence and enter its correct spelling.
Previous "Spell Check" quizzes: #1, #2.
Quiz by ThirdParty
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First submittedJanuary 2, 2014
Last updatedApril 21, 2014
Times taken16,957
Rating3.90
4:00
Enter correctly-spelled word here:
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Sentence
Correction
The audacious thieves stole the President's plane right out of its hanger.
hangar
Outwardly, I am keeping a tight rein on my grief—but inside, I am balling my eyes out.
bawling
She thought it wise to test her suitor's metal before accepting his marriage proposal.
mettle
The marvelous scents wafting from the kitchen peaked my appetite to a roar.
piqued
The princess was wearing a 16-caret gold tiara with jasper and turquoise insets.
karat
The pallbearers stared fixedly ahead as the church bells toiled for the deceased.
tolled
In my opinion, this tiff of yours is much to do about nothing—just make amends and move on.
ado
Thanks to urban sprawl, tracks of formerly useless wasteland are now worth fortunes.
tracts
After the renovations, the Jones's house has a three-car garage and a private pool.
Joneses'
What would you do differently in my straights, O fount of much criticism and little aid?
straits
The Court ruled that the General, by declaring marshal law, had exceeded his authority.
martial
I chock up my success to good upbringing, determined effort, and occasional lucky breaks.
chalk
The manor house looks like a haunted castle, with Gothic battlements and a rot-iron fence.
wrought
Practical jokes are okay if not mean-spirited, but this harassment goes beyond the pail.
pale.
Our archenemy has offered an armistice; let us cease the opportunity to make lasting peace.
seize
I miss the pistachio nugget that Grandma used to make every year at Christmas time.
nougat
A "prestidigitator" is a performer who entertains with magic tricks based on slight of hand.
sleight
Stone soup tastes even better if you add onions, parsnips, and a bullion cube to the stones.
bouillon
According to sailors' lore, their sighting of seven dolphins augers well for a successful voyage.
augurs
The troupe dressed up in stereotypical Gypsy clothing and performed flamingo dances.
flamenco
+1
level 73
Jan 7, 2014
Why isn't Joneses' spelled Jones' ?
+3
level 49
Jan 7, 2014
If Jones were a single person living alone, his house would be "Jones's house". But since the Joneses are multiple people, their house is "the Joneses' house". (Notice that the singular name does not take a "the", while the plural name does.)
+1
level 70
Mar 23, 2014
If you are showing possession then Jones's house is acceptable. But if you are just using the plural form of Jones, then Joneses would be correct. But I've never seen Joneses' used to show possession. For example you could say Presidents' terms of office if you are referring to terms served by more than one President. I would never say the Presidentses'. That's like saying the Presidentseses. BTW spell check indicated errors on both of these but not on Presidents'.
+3
level 49
Mar 23, 2014
Shiloh376: of course you would never say «Presidentses'». «President» is singular, «Presidents» is plural, and «Presidents'» is the plural possessive. In Jones's case, «Jones» is singular, «Joneses» is plural, and «Joneses'» is the plural possessive.
+1
level 63
Mar 24, 2014
A+, ThirdParty.
+1
level 72
Apr 26, 2015
"If Jones were a single person living alone, his house would be 'Jones's house'". No it wouldn't it would be Jones' house. You never have s apostrophe s.
+2
level 67
Sep 22, 2015
@WT2008: Yes, you can have s apostrophe s. That is the traditional way of forming possessives of words ending in s. There has been a trend in recent years to simplify grammar/spelling/pronunciation by allowing the last s to not be used, but it is correct to use s apostrophe s. I have over 20 years of experience as an editor, so I do know what I'm talking about. HelenO: Joneses' is correct for the plural possessive of the name Jones. Jones's is singular possessive; Joneses is plural; Joneses' is plural possessive (& as in the example above, Joneses's is the traditional way to spell the plural possessive of the name Jones). I agree w/irish41...ThirdParty gets an A+!
+2
level 73
Feb 3, 2016
The whole sentence is very misleading, it scans terribly - surely it should either be 'Since the renovations....' or '... house had a...'
+1
level 65
Sep 21, 2016
But can't it be "the Jones's house" as a house belonging to a single person called Jones? Nothing in this sentence indicates that it belongs to the family called Jones.
+2
level 72
Sep 21, 2016
The Donald is not singular then?
+2
level 52
Sep 23, 2016
It could also be Jones' house. English words ending in s can have the apostrophe alone to denote possession, as "in Jesus' name" Also, marvellous has 2 ls!
+1
level 79
Sep 25, 2016
There is nothing in this sentence that dictates that the house is owned by more than one person. Even if more than one person lived there, it could still be Jones's, as one person can own it while family live in it with him or her.
+3
level 67
Feb 11, 2018
@sf49ers - But if it were a lone Jones living there, then it would be "Jones's house," not "the Jones's house. Unless we're talking about THE Jones...
+2
level 71
Nov 30, 2015
it wouldn't be a mistake if the actual surname is Jone?
+1
level 59
Dec 15, 2015
Lol, nice point. The correction would be Jones's to Jone's.
+1
level 54
Jul 18, 2016
such controversy ;_;
+1
level 72
Oct 25, 2018
The Jones is something Cheech and Chong had when they were out of refreshments.
+2
level 17
Jan 27, 2014
I actually thought pistachio nuggets were a real thing. The idea of "nougat" never once dawned on me.
+1
level 63
Mar 24, 2014
Haha me neither!
+1
level 61
Mar 24, 2014
I agree, this one wasn't obvious.
+1
level 60
Mar 25, 2014
Same here.
+1
level 80
Jul 16, 2014
Ditto.
+1
level 62
Jan 26, 2017
Instantly obvious to me. Thanks to watching Australian MasterChef.
+1
level 61
Oct 7, 2019
Yea this one and rot-iron had me thinking whatever could they be looking for? in this case it dawned on me, (though still found it a little weird) but the rot-iron one, nah
+3
level 37
Jan 28, 2014
Some of these make amusing mental images. Such as the flamingo dancers, or the church bells toiling on as the deceased's slaves.
+3
level 49
Jan 29, 2014
I was particularly proud of the pun about the general exceeding his authority by declaring marshal law.
+2
level 83
Feb 26, 2014
I was proud of you for it, it was very well clued.

Also, add the plane hanging in the closet to the amusing mental image list.
+4
level 46
May 10, 2017
Plattitude's hangar comment reminded me of the time I asked my three year old daughter to help hang up the clothes and she got a look on her face - "hang UP?" She was picturing the clothes hanging UP toward the ceiling. : D
+1
level 71
Oct 17, 2016
I gave you four stars on the other two, ThirdParty, but FIVE on this one (which I give out VERY rarely) based on the excellence of said puns and mental images. The flamingo dancers SLAYED me, but I also got a good chuckle out of "rot-iron", as anyone would if they saw the state of my heavy backyard deck furniture.
+1
level 61
Oct 7, 2019
personally I actually felt the other way around, I found this one less than the other ones.
+2
level 68
Feb 26, 2014
The correction of "to do" to "ado" is a usage issue NOT a spelling correction as the words "to" and "do" are obviously spelled correctly.
+1
level 46
Mar 6, 2014
Yeah I noticed that too. It's not really a spell check quiz as much as it is proper word usage. Most of the 'misspelled' words are just homophones of the correct word.
+1
level 83
Mar 21, 2014
Not necessarily homophones, just instances where people will tend not to notice their mistaken usages as a result of the error not being caught by spellcheck.
+1
level 61
Oct 7, 2019
so all the other words in this quiz are spelled incorrectly??really? huh, I was sure that was how you wrote hanger and metal (etc), guess you learn things everyday..
+1
level 83
Feb 26, 2014
I was about to call shenanigans on seize... until I realized I'd misspelled the spelling correction as sieze. Seriously, whatever happened to i before e?
+5
level 72
Feb 26, 2014
"i" before "e"...unless you seize the opportunity to run a feisty heist on your weird beige foreign neighbor.
+2
level 68
Mar 1, 2014
Good job, Einstein!
+2
level 83
Mar 21, 2014
Your neighbor is actually covered by the exception noted in the rule (when sounded like A, as in neighbor and weigh). However, if your neighbor happens to be Deirdra, Keira, or Neil, be sure to measure their height, protein level, and caffeine level. And watch out for the rottweiller, who has a counterfeit seismograph and practices atheism, but only in foreign countries, where the sovereign has reinstituted his own deity, following the general zeitgeist.
+1
level 50
Aug 6, 2014
tschutzer, I love it. Thanks for making me laugh.
+1
level 72
Sep 24, 2018
Time to rein you in.
+1
level 70
Jul 8, 2016
It's "i" before "e" except after "c," or when sounding like "ay" as in Neighbor and Weigh. ...and on weekends, and holidays, and all throughout May, and you'll always be wrong, no matter WHAT you say.
+1
level 55
Mar 23, 2014
Thanks I enjoyed this!
+2
level 36
Mar 23, 2014
I would love to watch Gypsies perform flamingo dances.
+2
level 76
Sep 21, 2016
I would also love to see flamingos performing Romani dances.
+1
level 23
Mar 26, 2014
You have bastardized the English language!!
+1
level 66
Nov 17, 2014
No fair putting in a question that requires an apostrophe, because JetPunk ignores apostrophes (and hyphens and a whole host of other necessary punctuation).
+1
level 50
Apr 1, 2016
I'm saving that line about much criticism and little aid for a special occasion.
+1
level 25
Apr 24, 2016
I'm Aussie and it's either -- I see apologise, I see apologize. Shrug. This quiz is great!
+2
level 41
May 2, 2016
I love these quizzes and I've taken all three now. My only suggestion would be to add more time. I don't even get to the last four or five sentences before time runs out.
+1
level 61
Oct 7, 2019
this one does seem to be a lot shorter in time than the other ones
+3
level 39
Jul 8, 2016
It might be because I'm not a native English speaker but for me the difficult part in some of these sentences isn't identifying the wrong word or spelling the right word correctly but simply figuring out what the hell the sentence was supposed to be in the first place. Like how does someone get from "nougat" to "nugget" and what does "suitor's mettle" even mean??
+1
level 39
Jul 10, 2016
A suitor is a man who hopes to marry someone and mettle means having the ability to deal with difficultiess in life and is reliable. So a woman would look for this quality in a man (if she has any sense). Nougat is often mispronounced "nugget". At least, we do in Britain.
+1
level 76
Sep 21, 2016
I always hear it as "new'-gut" here in the US.
+1
level 52
Oct 12, 2018
and i have always heard it called noo-gar
+1
level 61
Oct 7, 2019
yea that is how I hear/sea/read it. noo -gah (noo as in noon)
+2
level 69
Jul 13, 2016
I was kinda just assuming that a pistachio nugget was some American thing I've not encountered, so that sentence completely mystified me. As others have said, it's a rather large leap from nugget nougat, though perhaps the pistachios should have given it away.
+1
level 61
Oct 7, 2019
yup it becomes more like what else starts with an n and is edible
+1
level 72
Sep 21, 2016
Enjoyed the witty strap-line!
+2
level 76
Sep 21, 2016
Boullion, boulion, boullon, bah! I never could spell that word.
+2
level 57
Sep 21, 2016
I find it slightly unfair as to me rot and wrought don't really sound the same and nougat and nugget sound nothing alike, so it's difficult to guess what you were going for. Also, the "to do/ado" one wasn't a spelling mistake, it was just a word that fit better.
+1
level 44
Sep 21, 2016
This was one of the more interesting spelling quizzes I've done for a while. Nice work!
+2
level 48
Sep 21, 2016
Enjoyed the quiz. I would vote for another minute... If others aren't in agreement with me, maybe I just gotta start reading faster!
+2
level 52
Oct 12, 2018
i am with you... working out what the hell he is saying takes time
+1
level 59
Sep 22, 2016
Marvellous has 2 L's
+1
level 65
Sep 23, 2016
Agreed. Double l in marvellous in the UK - perhaps select a synonym if you wish to remain UK/US spelling neutral.
+2
level 57
Sep 28, 2016
Much to do about nothing is not a misspelling, it's a misquote. Both "to" and "do" are spelled correctly.
+2
level 59
Oct 23, 2016
Like others, not at all happy about the Jones question. We have friends called Jones - we just call them the Jones. We wouldn't dream of saying the Joneses.
+2
level 62
Jan 26, 2017
You're not from NZ then. Here just about everyone uses nicknames and changes words. Mr Jones would be Jonesey.
+1
level 72
Sep 24, 2018
The Joneseys's
+1
level 67
Nov 9, 2017
I don't think it would improve the taste, but stone soup would sure become a lot more expensive if you added bullion to it!
+1
level 39
Jun 26, 2018
...what is stone soup?...
+1
level 72
Sep 24, 2018
It's something you can find in Mountain View, California, USA right by the giant Google logo.
+1
level 15
Jan 14, 2018
3:19 to spare GG
+1
level 44
Jul 5, 2018
i am way too dumb for this
+1
level 66
Nov 25, 2018
As a native speaker of English (as distinct from American, which seems at times to be a different language) I spotted two spelling mistakes in the fourth question. Marvellous is not spelled with a single "l". Also, to weigh in rather late on the Jones debate - the answer is Jones' (usually pronounced "joaneses") - I'd have definitely been marked down by my English teacher had I suggested Joneses', which you'd have to pronounce "joanseses"!
+1
level 44
Jan 3, 2019
When a word ends in 's', an apostrophe without an extra 's' is generally used just with mythological or archaic names, like Jesus' or Zeus', and sometimes not even then.
+1
level 59
Jan 24, 2019
Indeed there are differences--marvelous/marvellous is spelled with a single L in the US, so perhaps the sentence should be removed.
+1
level 46
Mar 27, 2019
Jones is a name not a word.
+1
level 61
Oct 7, 2019
Some where so far off that I didnt have an inkling what could be meant. Well mainly with rot-iron, I would be amazed if anyone EVER made that mistake. I get that you want to put "existing" words in there that sound similar, so you wont put in wraught or something. But this one is too farfetched imo. They have to stay atleast somewhat realistic.