New York Yankees Retired Numbers

Can you guess the baseball players who have had their numbers retired by the New York Yankees?
Quiz by onorevolev
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Last updated: May 17, 2017
First submittedJuly 23, 2014
Times taken5,343
Rating3.32
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#
Position
Year
Player
1
2B, Manager
1986
Billy Martin
2
SS
2017
Derek Jeter
3
RF
1948
Babe Ruth
4
1B
1939
Lou Gehrig
5
CF
1952
Joe DiMaggio
6
Manager
2014
Joe Torre
7
CF
1969
Mickey Mantle
8
C
1972
Yogi Berra
8
C
1972
Bill Dickey
9
RF
1984
Roger Maris
10
SS
1985
Phil Rizzuto
15
C
1979
Thurman Munson
#
Position
Year
Player
16
P
1974
Whitey Ford
20
C
2015
Jorge Posada
23
1B
1997
Don Mattingly
32
C
1984
Elston Howard
37
Manager
1970
Casey Stengel
42
RP
2013
Mariano Rivera
42
(All MLB)
1997
Jackie Robinson
44
RF
1993
Reggie Jackson
46
P
2015
Andy Pettitte
49
P
2003
Ron Guidry
51
CF
2015
Bernie Williams
+1
Level 82
May 18, 2017
How did 8 and 42 get retired twice?
+5
Level 71
May 18, 2017
Not sure about 8, but 42 was retired by all of Major League baseball in celebration of Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier. At the time, there were still a few players wearing number 42 so they were allowed to keep it until they switched teams or retired. Rivera was one of them and became one of the best closers of all time. He would be the last person to ever wear 42 in the MLB as his number was retired in 2013.
+3
Level 73
May 18, 2017
Yogi Berra wore #8 immediately after Dickey. Both Hall of Famers and the Yankees retired the number on the same day, commemorating both catchers.
+3
Level 77
May 21, 2017
Hip-hip...Jorge!
+2
Level 66
May 21, 2017
Had one of those "How did I miss..." about five times with DiMaggio, Maris, Mantle, Stengel, and Torre...
+2
Level 62
May 21, 2017
Damn, this multi-generational dynasty reminds me of the Boston Celtics. For both, most of the credit goes to the genius of the front office and coaching staff
+1
Level 64
May 21, 2017
Andy Pettitte? Are you kidding me?
+2
Level 55
May 22, 2017
Why would they be kidding. I could type out the many reasons that is should be retired, but ill just c/p wikipedia For his career, Pettitte had a 256–153 win-loss record with a 3.85 ERA and 2,448 strikeouts in 3,316 innings. He also never had a losing season in the major leagues. Among Yankees pitchers, Pettitte ranks first in strikeouts (2,020), tied-first in games started (438), and third in wins (219).[59] Pettitte and Rivera have combined for a record 81 (11 in the playoffs) win-save combinations, the most in history.[60] They, along with teammates Derek Jeter and Jorge Posada, have been noted as the "Core Four", as they were teammates for the five World Series won by the Yankees between 1996–2009. During the period from 1995–2010, no major league pitcher accumulated more regular season victories than Pettitte did. His 148 wins from 2000 to 2009 were the most of the decade.[61]
+2
Level 64
Jul 23, 2020
I am acutely aware of all of this. I grew up in New York during the Yankees' dynasty. Andy Pettitte was an above-average pitcher who was very good in his best years, but he wasn't even a true ace. I understand Yankee fans are sentimental about guys like Pettitte, Bernie Williams, Jorge Posada, etc. There's a lot of love for them because they played hard and were good-to-very-good players for a long time (and during some great years for the team). But none of them are great, and none of them have any business having their numbers retired. There really should be a standard. I could understand a lower standard for a team like the Brewers or Rockies, who are hurting for heroes, but it really dilutes the prestige when you're ranking Any Pettitte alongside the likes of Babe Ruth, Mickey Mantle, Lou Gehrig, Mariano Rivera, and Yoga Berra. Those are first-ballot, all-time great players. Andy Pettitte was...pretty good.
+1
Level 57
Jul 23, 2020
Petite only owned up to using HGH twice to recover from injury. I believe that was just damage control. More likely he used it on a regular basis like his buddy Roger Clemens.
+1
Level 55
May 22, 2017
Pettitte was 19–10 with a 3.83 ERA and 173 strikeouts in the postseason (1995–2003, 2005, 2007, 2009–2010), with the most postseason wins in MLB history. He also holds the all-time postseason record for most starts (42) and innings pitched in the postseason (263). He was the second starting pitcher in history to win three series-clinching games (ALDS, ALCS and World Series) in the same postseason (2009). Derek Lowe did the same in 2004, but with one of the wins in relief, and additionally, Pettitte won the regular game in which the Yankees clinched the division. When Pettitte started Game 3 of the 2009 World Series, he passed Christy Mathewson and Waite Hoyt, with the second most World Series starts. Whitey Ford is in front with 22 starts. Pettitte has played in 8 different World Series (7 with the Yankees, and one with the Astros), and been on the winning end of 19 postseason series – both of which are tops among active players.
+1
Level 69
May 23, 2017
Perhaps he's surprised due to Pettitte using steroids. To Pettitte's credit, he was one of the few guys who owned up to his involvement with steroids.
+1
Level 64
Jul 23, 2020
These are all very contrived stats though. Basically every one of them is the product of spending a long time on a team that always made the Series from the mid-90s forward. Justin Verlander is ten times the pitcher Pettitte was, but he can't help that he was stuck on a middling Tigers team that only made the Series once in his prime. The Yankees made the playoffs every year for like 16 years straight, and right at the advent of the wild card, which means they got one more round than earlier players to compile stats. There wasn't even a league championship series until 1969, so greats like Koufax have fewer postseason wins because they only played one postseason series per season. You have to be good to be a starting pitcher on a World Series team. You don't have to be great. Pettitte was reliable. He had a few really good runs, but he was not the star of any of those teams. The fact that he was a pretty good player on some very great teams does not make him great.
+1
Level 46
May 26, 2017
It seems weird that Rivera is put in as "RP" while all the other pitchers are just simply "P". I would actually put him in as "CP"
+1
Level 36
Aug 2, 2018
21 ought to be retired as well!
+1
Level 80
Jul 23, 2020
An unusually high number of catchers.
+1
Level 73
Jul 23, 2020
I knew Ruth and DiMaggio and Berra but honestly have never heard of any of the other people on this list.
+1
Level 58
Jul 24, 2020
I tried spelling 46, four different ways
+1
Level 54
Jul 24, 2020
foughty-sicks
+1
Level 50
Jul 25, 2020
I almost forgot Robinson. That was a good one. Very tricky.
+2
Level 78
Jul 25, 2020
A bit of trivia about the father of Elston Howard who was the first African-American on the Yankee roster - Elston's father, Travis Howard, was a teacher in southeast Missouri and believed land ownership was the key to elevating blacks from poverty, so he bought a farm in New Madrid County and sold lots to black sharecroppers. The town was named Howardville after him.