The United States... or the United Kingdom?

For each statement, guess whether it applies to the United States, the United Kingdom, or both.
Quiz by adrmcm
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Last updated: January 12, 2021
First submittedMarch 14, 2019
Times taken20,606
Rating4.68
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1. Has a President as its head of state
United States
United Kingdom
Both
2. Has a higher GDP per capita
United States
United Kingdom
3. Has a higher population density
United States
United Kingdom
4. Has a red, white, and blue flag
United States
United Kingdom
Both
5. Is the birthplace of Daniel Radcliffe
United States
United Kingdom
6. Is part of NATO
United States
United Kingdom
Both
7. Has a higher murder rate
United States
United Kingdom
8. More than 20% of adults are obese
United States
United Kingdom
Both
As of 2016, the obesity rate was 36.2% for the U.S. and 27.8% for the U.K.
9. More than 10% of residents were born in a different country
United States
United Kingdom
Both
14.4% for the U.K and 15.1% for the U.S.
10. Has the higher average latitude of the two
United States
United Kingdom
11. Eggs are typically refrigerated in the grocery store
United States
United Kingdom
Both
12. Road signs mostly use miles, not kilometers
United States
United Kingdom
Both
13. Paper money comes in different sizes
United States
United Kingdom
Both
14. Drinks more alcohol per capita
United States
United Kingdom
15. Judges and lawyers commonly wear wigs in court
United States
United Kingdom
Both
+2
Level 62
Mar 18, 2019
Good quiz!
+6
Level 53
Nov 12, 2020
Surprised so many people missed latitude.
+14
Level 82
Jan 12, 2021
Perhaps (like me) they thought it was a trick question to trip you up by forgetting about Alaska.
+3
Level 87
Jan 13, 2021
It helped me that it said "average" latitude...
+2
Level 47
Jan 20, 2021
Scotland is virtually the same latitude as Alaska as well
+1
Level 58
Jan 20, 2021
That needs to change.
+21
Level 69
Jan 13, 2021
I missed it... my brain short-circuited and I thought it meant "elevation."
+1
Level 28
Jan 13, 2021
same
+1
Level 65
Jan 20, 2021
same
+1
Level 55
May 28, 2021
Glad we're all going crazy together
+17
Level 63
Jan 15, 2021
I misread it as altitude and I'm guessing I'm not the only one.
+3
Level 74
Jan 20, 2021
Yup. I did the same.
+2
Level 84
Apr 12, 2021
misread it as altitude...
+6
Level 83
Jan 12, 2021
The wig thing is a straight face test for defendants. Well, for everyone.
+2
Level 74
Jan 12, 2021
it's pretty rare now outside the criminal courts.
+1
Level 73
May 14, 2021
For you*
+2
Level 80
Jan 13, 2021
Have to disagree on the money question - while certainly not colorful, if you set the various US bills next to each other, the Hamilton ($10) is obviously a different color (yellowish) and Benjamins ($100) have a bluish tint.
+1
Level 80
Jan 13, 2021
They do look a lot more distinct than I thought they were in the picture on the United States dollar wikipedia page.
+2
Level ∞
Jan 13, 2021
Easy fix. Changed to "different sizes".
+9
Level 74
Jan 13, 2021
Wait what? British signs use miles???
+3
Level 21
Jan 13, 2021
I didnt know the US did lol
+3
Level 72
Jan 13, 2021
Yep, signs are in miles. Although the driver location markers at the side of our motorways are spaced in kilometres.
+18
Level 56
Jan 13, 2021
Arguably, British units of measurements are even stranger than us Americans. At least we stay consistently stupid.
+6
Level 73
Jan 21, 2021
Whoever decided 'stones' was a good unit of measurement obviously never had to teach it. Teaching multiples of 14 is not easy or fun.
+1
Level 58
Jan 13, 2021
Question 14 is spelled wrong - should be "alcohol"
+1
Level ∞
Jan 13, 2021
Okay
+3
Level 83
Jan 13, 2021
"15. Judges and lawyers commonly wear wigs"

Replace "judges and lawyers" with "presidents and prime ministers", and we'll talk later.

+4
Level 50
Jan 15, 2021
British banknote currency is largely polymer. All notes apart from the £50 note are currently polymer (which is getting a plastic one in 2021). They are different sizes but it is worth pointing out that they are made of polymer, not paper.
+2
Level 80
Jan 15, 2021
Canadian bills are polymer as well. Just use the term "bills" to differentiate from coins.
+5
Level 73
Jan 20, 2021
I know what you mean, but in the UK, we refer to our paper/polymer money as 'notes' rather than bills. In a restaurant you'd pay a £20 bill with a £20 note. Chances of hearing money referred to as a bill would be slim-to-none.
+1
Level 66
Jan 20, 2021
Uh, wasn't this quiz featured just a week or two ago? Or am I just misremembering? I definitely took this quiz recently.
+1
Level 71
Jan 20, 2021
Maybe you took it on the "New and Reset Quizzes" page. You can check the date under "more stats" for this quiz, but I'm relatively sure it wasn't featured before.
+4
Level 65
Jan 20, 2021
It would be funny if you allowed to pick the answer "both" for Daniel Racliffe's birthplace.

Though, chances are there is at least one person born in United States with this name too.

+1
Level 55
Jan 20, 2021
15 is Both. Plenty of judges and lawyers wear toupees.
+1
Level 64
Jan 20, 2021
why do they not refrigerate their eggs? do they just keep them out in the open?
+9
Level 48
Jan 20, 2021
Yes. Eggs have a natural cuticle which seals them against bacteria, and if it is undisturbed it is safe to keep them at room temperature, so you will typically buy and keep eggs this way in Europe. Farming methods in Europe resulting cleaner eggs that don't require washing.

In the U.S., this coating is washed off, allowing bacteria into the egg. This cleaning is needed due to factory farming methods that result in more frequent external contamination. Due to the washing, the eggs need to be kept refrigerated.

More detail here: https://www.businessinsider.com/why-europeans-dont-refrigerate-eggs-2014-12?op=1

+1
Level 66
Jan 25, 2021
This is very interesting!
+2
Level 78
Jan 26, 2021
My grandmother kept her eggs on the counter but refrigerated them if they weren't used within a day or two. Hers hardly ever had chicken poo on them but when my cousin's did she knew they wouldn't keep well if washed, so she would let the poo dry and then sand it off with sandpaper! When my kids were home we ate all the eggs we collected each day so I didn't have to worry about where to keep them or if they needed washing..
+1
Level 51
Jan 21, 2021
Why in the world are English signs in miles instead of kilometers?
+5
Level 55
Jan 22, 2021
Because we use miles for distance when we're driving. For the same reasons we still use imperial measurements for people (height and weight), but metric for everything else (i.e. no reason whatsoever)
+1
Level 59
Jan 23, 2021
For historical reasons - we've been using them for centuries, and we are very attached to miles (and a few other imperial weights and measures, like pints).
+4
Level 58
Jan 26, 2021
Because The Proclaimers would never have had a hit with '500 Kilometres'.
+1
Level 84
Apr 12, 2021
Changing the speed limit signs would be fairly easy as national speed limits are just marked with a symbol and others are fairly close to round numbers of km/h. Mile marker signs tend to be more precise so would either require all of them to have non-round numbers or be moved to the nearest km unit which just seems not worth it.
+1
Level 57
Feb 8, 2021
15/15 I'm in the top 4.5%!!! That's rare for me.
+1
Level 70
Jun 1, 2021
I guessed a few here but was lucky and got 15/15. Interesting quiz.