English Dutch Loanwords

Try and guess the English loanwords based on the given Dutch words.
Quiz by TimTheEnchanter
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Last updated: August 15, 2012
First submittedAugust 15, 2012
Times taken1,513
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Hint
Answer
Hoi!
Ahoy!
Vast! Stop!
Avast!
Bazuin
Bazooka
Bolwerk
Bulwark
Koolsla
Coleslaw
Ezel
Easel
Verloren
Forlorn
Verlof
Furlough
IJsberg
Iceberg
Kielhalen
Keelhauling
Manneke
Mannequin
Pekel
Pickle
Hint
Answer
Rugzak
Rucksack
Sinterklaas
Santa Claus
Schuim
Scum
Smeerkaas
Smearcase
Stilleven
Still life
Stokvis
Stockfish
Tulp
Tulip
Trekker
Trigger
Wafel
Waffle
Jacht
Yacht
Jan Kees
Yankee
+3
Level 83
May 31, 2014
keelhaul! didn't type -ing :(
+2
Level 57
Oct 16, 2019
Keelhaul should be accepted, the dutch can mean the infinitive.
+1
Level 37
Jun 7, 2020
Me too
+1
Level 46
Sep 16, 2014
Rather difficult, only 12 out of 23. Should have got more; I'm Dutch...
+1
Level 65
Mar 1, 2019
I got 14 and I'm Malaysian!
+1
Level 45
Oct 22, 2014
Nice quiz, but here's a bug: Rucksack is not from Dutch rugzak, but from German Rucksack. As well may bulwark, keelhauling, smearcase, and still life be derived from the German words Bollwerk, kielholen, Schmierkäse (in which the pronunciation of the a also is closer), Stillleben. Thought forlorn was of German origin, too, but learned better now.
+1
Level 51
May 23, 2015
Most words that have to do with sea life have dutch origins, due to the Dutch influence in the 17th century as a sea faring nation. I can imagine that many other words have germanic origins, but then the Dutch brought them al over the world, whereas the Germans started their empirical politics a bit later in history :)
+1
Level 38
Oct 13, 2017
Forgive me, but isn't Dutch itself of Germanic origin? Of course the two would have words in common, with slight variations of spelling, just like American and British English. (Though, they too are of Germanic origin!) - Cant' escape German, Peeps!
+3
Level 67
Jan 18, 2019
About the rucksack and cheese you could be right (never heard about smear case though). But I dont think you are correct about the other ones. A lot of words are nearly the same in german and dutch, but what counts is what language english got it from. You can compare some words english took from french, you could say no they come from latin, if nearly the same word excist in latin. But if they havent borrowed it directly you would say they got it from french.

(that is the reason some words are borrowed twice with a long period of time in between, so one of the words have evolved. You end up with two similar words with different meanings. Very interesting :) )

+1
Level 67
Jan 18, 2019
I looked it up and the other ones are definitely from dutch.
+1
Level 38
Feb 24, 2017
OK. Dutch is my first language, and I didn't get the majority of these but there's one thing that I know for sure: EZEL - means donkey or Jackass IJZEL - means easel
+2
Level 45
May 4, 2018
divantilya: They mean "(schilders)ezel" from which easel is indeed derived. Though I would like to point out to the one who made this quiz that when translating a verb in its infinitive form (Du. hele werkwoord) you cannot use the -ing form.Therefore the answer to kielhalen should not be 'keelhauling', but 'to keelhaul'.
+1
Level 38
Oct 10, 2018
On taking this quiz again (or rather, finishing it, because I got so disgusted the last time that I simply logged out) I found several other errors: Vast = Secure(d) [I have no idea what avast is] Verloren = Lost, (not forlorn) Smeerkaas = Cheese spread (not smearcase) Trekker = A Hiker - someone who hikes, (not trigger) And the best translation of Rugzak is Backpack!
+2
Level 67
Jan 18, 2019
Those are the translations but not the derivations. Sometimes languages loan a word and nearly keep it in the same meaning as the original. But often it is only loosely based on the original meaning.

avast is obviously the antivirus program. No seriously it is a nautical term (coming from dutch hou vast).

I think you kind of missed the intention of the quiz

+1
Level 67
Jan 18, 2019
Bolwerk is responsible for the word boulevard. That was the first thing I tried ( then I remembered bulwark aswell, but didnt know how to write it. tried bolwark...)
+1
Level 33
May 7, 2019
Agree, boulevard should also be accepted (through French, just like mannequin).
+1
Level 15
Sep 20, 2019
Nice quiz! I'm a native Dutchmen, and I learned a few things from this quiz. My best take away was that Yankee comes from Jan Kees. I love these little useless facts. ;o)
+1
Level 24
Feb 16, 2020
to be honest i don't think you should compare sinterklaas and santa claus since they are different things
+1
Level 38
Apr 9, 2020
^ No they're not. They both are translations of Saint Nicolas.
+1
Level 37
Jun 7, 2020
Smearcase?? Have you just made that word up? I'm going to look on Google...