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Religion A-Z #1

Guess these religion-themed answers from A to Z
All answers are a single word
For the purpose of this quiz, "religion", "ideology", and "spirituality" are interchangeable
Quiz by buck1017
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First submittedDecember 28, 2013
Last updatedNovember 27, 2018
Times taken28,108
Rating3.97
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Clue
Answer
A
Last word in the Lord's Prayer
Amen
B
Siddhārtha Gautama by
another name
Buddha
C
Leader of the Church of England:
Archbishop of __________
Canterbury
D
Slayer of Goliath
David
E
First woman in the Bible
Eve
F
Pope elected in 2013
Francis
G
Hotel room Bible distributor
Gideons
H
Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca
Hajj
I
Most populous Shia-majority country
Iran
J
Indian religion that espouses
non-violence to all living creatures
Jainism
K
Cube-shaped building in Mecca;
Islam's most holy site
Kaaba
L
His wife became a pillar of salt
Lot
M
Mosque tower from which the
call to prayer is made
Minaret
 
Clue
Answer
N
Famous ark builder & flood survivor
Noah
O
Father of Thor
Odin
P
Movement started by Martin Luther:
__________ Reformation
Protestant
Q
Holy book of Islam
Quran
R
Religion that originated in Jamaica
Rastafari
S
Indigenous religion of Japan
Shinto
T
First five books of the Jewish Bible
Torah
U
City where Abraham was born
Ur
V
Blue four-armed Hindu God
Vishnu
W
Modern pagan religion
symbolized by a pentagram
Wicca
X
Taoist term for an enlightened person
Xian
Y
Group of Hindu spiritual practices that
includes stretching exercises
Yoga
Z
The Holy Land - synonymous
with Jerusalem
Zion
+1
level 38
Aug 29, 2014
I would like to point out that Wicca is not symbolized by a pentagram. A pentacle represents Wicca. The difference being that a pentacle is not inverted like the pentagram that represents Satanism
+1
level 73
Aug 30, 2014
according to Wicca-pedia, a pentacle is a pentagram circumscribed by a circle. Not being Wiccan (or any religion for that matter), myself, I just go by what I read. I just wanted to include more religions than just the big 3.
+8
level 67
Oct 26, 2016
Are you saying a Wiccan has to be circumscribed?
+1
level 71
Nov 29, 2018
Rushing immediately to Google with unbridled glee to check out the brilliantly-named "Wiccapedia", I was a little disappointed to find it was a book, rather than an actual online wiki. Still, it's a very clever name!
+1
level 67
Feb 19, 2019
And thanks for that. But what are the "big 3"?
+1
level 70
Dec 2, 2018
Pentacle is some truly girly vodka.
+1
level 76
Oct 26, 2016
Could have sworn it was spelled "minuret". 25/26 for knowing the answers but not knowing how to spell them.
+1
level 75
Dec 1, 2018
Well, it's transliterated from Arabic so there are a number of spellings. I haven't seen 'minuret' personally but I see no reason not to include it as a type-in :)
+1
level 83
Dec 19, 2018
Huh, I had always assumed the term was some kind of love child between miniature and turret, no idea it had come from Arabic.
+1
level 59
Oct 26, 2016
Zion isn't the holy land, it's David's citadel that ultimately became Jerusalem.
+1
level 61
Oct 28, 2016
More specifically, it is the temple mount in Jerusalem.
+1
level 76
Jul 1, 2018
No, it's not. Definitely not. You're both wrong.

Mount Zion and the Temple Mount are two very different things. Mount Zion is one of the hills that the ancient city of Jerusalem was built on or near. Zion came to be synonymous with the city and most of the time when people refer to "Zion" they are talking about the city of Jerusalem. However, it is also used to refer to the Biblical Land of Israel, as well, and in modern usage it came to represent Israel as the nationalist movement to found a Jewish homeland was Zionism- Zion in this since definitely meant a Jewish homeland, a parallel to the Biblical Land of Israel.

+1
level 76
Aug 27, 2018
sense*
+1
level 76
Jul 1, 2018
No idea where super got the idea about it being David's citadel, or even what he means by that. The archaeological ruin called the city of David is between the old walled city of Jerusalem and the Kidron Valley. Not on Mt Zion. The Jerusalem citadel is located on higher ground, part of the walls of the old city, and was built by King Herod and others long after David was dead. The "Tower of David" on top of said citadel was so named, ironically, by ignorant Christian crusaders who, upon arriving in Jerusalem for the first time, assumed that David must have built it. In fact it's a Muslim minaret constructed centuries later. In any case it is also not on Mt Zion and not synonymous with Zion.

+1
level 76
Jul 1, 2018
The "Temple Mount" is an artificial platform of stonework that was expanded by Herod to make room for the giant 2nd temple he had constructed there. The "First Temple" was built on a hill which came to be known as the Temple Mount. Tradition holds that this hill is where Abraham went to murder his son on the suggestion of the voices in his head. It is not Mt Zion. That's a different hill. The First Temple was destroyed by Babylonians. The Hebrews who worshipped there were enslaved in Babylon. The Persian Empire conquered Babylon and set the Jews free. Zerubbabel led his people back to Jerusalem where they built the "Second Temple" on the same site- but everyone was bummed out because the First Temple was so much cooler. Then Herod the Great, half Jew half Arab Roman stooge, wanting to impress everyone and especially his Jewish subjects that mostly hated him, decided to renovate and make the temple the most impressive structure in the empire.
+1
level 76
Jul 1, 2018
His plans for this construction project were so grand that they would not fit on the hill where the temple currently sat... so his solution was to expand the hill. They brought in massive stones and extended the hill into a large rectangular platform. The Second Temple, after Herod's expansion, became one of the largest and most magnificent buildings in the Roman Empire. Then it was destroyed by Titus. But it was never called Zion. The platform Herod built remains in the Jewish quarter of the Old City, even though the temple is long gone, and is still called the Temple Mount. Jews traditionally would not set foot on it as it was too holy. Christians turned it into a place where they heaped garbage and dung, as an insult to Jews. After the Muslim conquest, it was cleared off and they constructed the Dome of the Rock and Al Aqsa Mosque on top of it.

Here's a map
+1
level 70
Dec 2, 2018
I think that was more than the first 5 books of the Jewish bible.
+2
level 76
Feb 21, 2019
Spoken like someone who doesn't read very much.
+7
level 72
Nov 27, 2018
*Crap, something that begins with X? Ok, Xi looks like it might work. Not yet? Maybe an a? How about an n-HOLY CRAP IT WORKED!*
+2
level 62
Nov 28, 2018
I find it very hard to believe you randomly thought of those exact letters in that exact order.
+4
level 75
Dec 1, 2018
^ Behold, misplaced skepticism.
+1
level 67
Feb 19, 2019
It was precisely my process too.
+2
level 70
Dec 2, 2018
Xian is a major, ancient Chinese city.
+2
level 58
Feb 18, 2019
The city should be transcribed as Xi'an, because it is two characters, but the Daoist term is Xian, which is only one character.
+1
level 63
Apr 24, 2019
Frost Star, do you know specifically which character that is?
+1
level 44
Nov 29, 2018
Rastafarianism started in Ethiopia
+1
level ∞
Nov 29, 2018
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rastafari
+3
level 71
Nov 29, 2018
Darn it – if only there was a way to double-check things like this on the Internet! That way people could be sure of their "facts" before "correcting" quiz makers on their "mistakes". Seriously, the tech industry really should invent something; it's high time the web starts being useful for more than just cat videos! I'd give such a tool a really fun but important-sounding title – you know, like the name of a really big number or something. I'm thinking maybe "Quattuordecillion", or is that too hard to spell?
+1
level 75
Dec 1, 2018
I'm on it!! I just need to find a garage.
+1
level 76
Nov 30, 2018
well... if the position of JetPunk is that Christianity started with Jesus then, to be consistent, we should say that Rastafarianism started in Ethiopia. Both Selassie and Jesus had no intention of starting a new religion but both were later identified as the messiah by others who built a religion around them.

If Rastafarianism was founded in Jamaica then Christianity was founded in Turkey, Syria, Greece, or Rome- but certainly not Israel.
+1
level 73
Nov 30, 2018
Is that really Jetpunk's position that Christianity started with Jesus? And can a quiz website really have a position on things like religion? I think you'd be hard pressed to find biblical scholars that believe that Jesus "started" Christianity. He may have been the central figure that the religion is based around, but guys like Paul really got Christianity going. Same with Rastafari. Selassie may be held in high regard by Rastafarians, but he didn't necessarily start the religion.
+2
level 83
Dec 19, 2018
Regardless of whether Christianity was started by Christ or Paul, I think Israel is still the only reasonable answer. If Paul started the religion, the leadership of the organization he worked in (Peter, etc) was still based in the area around Jerusalem. I might hear an argument for Damascus, but even that's a stretch.
+1
level 76
Feb 16, 2019
Jesus is frequently credited on quizzes here as being the "founder of Christianity," so, yes, I think that means the website is taking a position on this. Look up the word founder.

Plats: it's very ambiguous when exactly Christianity became something apart from Judaism. And who was responsible for that transition. My personal opinion would be to credit Paul, who wanted to convert the gentiles (non-Jews) en masse, as Judaism was never and continues to not be an evangelistic faith, or else Peter or Constantine since Christianity, as we know it today, is essentially a Roman religion. Paul was doing his work in Turkey and Syria, Peter was martyred in Rome, and the authors of the New Testament gospels were educated Greek-speaking subjects of the Roman Empire most likely writing in Turkey, Greece, or Syria. There wasn't much in the way of "leadership" of Christianity at the time of Paul, in Palestine or anywhere else.
+1
level 69
Feb 18, 2019
Well, Jesus, according to church doctrine at least, did major changes to the jewish creed and presented himself as a fullfiller of prophecies. Haile Selassie was on record saying, he didn't believe in Rastafarianism (which should be kind of a red flag for a religion). I believe it would be justifiable to say, that Jesus was the subject of the later evolving Christianity, while Haile Selassie was merely an object of Rastafarianism, created by the social stress and romantization of african nationalism in Jamaica at this point in time.
+1
level 76
Feb 19, 2019
For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled.

Who do you trust more? Jesus or contemporary Christians?
+1
level 75
Feb 19, 2019
The question of who actually founded Christianity is often debated among Christians, with Jesus or Paul the usual names up for debate. Personally I believe Jesus is the foundation of Christianity, but not sure I would say anyone is the "founder". It's a movement that began with Christ's teachings and was spread by his followers, but since Jesus was a Jew maybe Abraham should be given some credit, too. It's one of those questions I think is a waste of time. I don't see how it really matters who gets the credit, and I don't think Christ would be happy with that debate. Jesus wasn't too happy with James and John when they asked to have the seats of honor next to his side in glory. He tried to explain to them that he would be more impressed by their sacrifices and suffering in his name, rather than their begging to have prime seats next to him in heaven. Arguing over who is the earthly founder of Christianity misses the whole point, but I still get the answer correct on quizzes here.
+1
level 76
Feb 21, 2019
ander: I'd agree more with the word "foundation" than "founder." The only time it matters (to most of us) is when taking quizzes on a trivia website and there are questions pertaining to where a religion was founded or who it was founded by. In that instance, then it helps very much to have a consistent standard! Though, yes, I think most people get the answers anyway.

(It might also matter to Rastafarians who notice the obvious inconsistency and the implication that while Christian tradition regarding Jesus is true or at least taken at face value, Rastafari tradition regarding Selassie can be ignored. Any Rastafari here?)
+1
level 76
Feb 24, 2019
Another relevant example: JetPunk regards Joseph Smith as the founder of Mormonism, as, in reality, he was. However, according to the traditions of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (the Mormons), Joseph Smith was merely a translator of tablets he found that were inscribed by the prophet Mormon. Now... of course... there is zero historical evidence that this Mormon person ever existed, and the events described on these alleged plates are inconsistent with what we know about history, so it makes sense that we should discount Mormon as being the founder of Mormonism, but you could say the same thing about Jesus and the Gospels. Claiming that Jesus was the founder of Christianity and that Joseph Smith was the founder of Mormonism shows clear bias against Mormons and for Christians.
+1
level 72
Jul 10, 2019
Ander - on an unrelated note, doesn't what you said bother you? This bit - "he would be more impressed by their sacrifices and suffering in his name"

It's fair enough to discourage greed but seems pretty odd that one's supposed saviour would wish suffering on his followers and claim that it's a good thing
+1
level 38
Dec 4, 2018
Rastafarianism began in Jamaica. It considers the Ethiopian Emperor, Haile Selassie, as a demi-god, but the religion did not originate in Ethiopia.
+2
level 76
Feb 16, 2019
Then calling Jesus the founder of Christianity is exactly analogous to calling Haile Selassie the founder of Rastafarianism. Neither one of them thought they were founding a religion, even though they are regarded as god-men messiahs by religions that were later founded by others inspired by them. Jesus was very much a Jew. A Jewish blasphemer, maybe, but still a Jew.
+1
level 38
Aug 13, 2019
Christians are followers of or believers in the Christ (Jesus). He did not start Christianity, he just did away with many of the 500 laws that the Jews had been previously commanded to obey and instituted the concept of love, kindness and meekness (rather than war) conquering evil. Those who were his disciples (Peter, Paul, John, Matthias...) are the ones who sought to convert Jews and Pagans alike to Christianity.
+1
level 55
Aug 13, 2019
The archbishop of Canterbury is not the leader of the Church of England. The reigning monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II, is.
+1
level 53
Aug 13, 2019
i got ur by typing "ur mom" in frustration