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Two Letter Answers #1

Guess these answers that are only two letters long.
Answer must correspond to highlighted box!
Quiz by buck1017
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Last updated: February 20, 2016
First submittedMarch 5, 2014
Times taken44,928
Rating3.97
3:00
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Clue
Answer
Approximately 3.14
Pi
Pixar movie
Up
One of Jupiter's moons
Io
Slang for hairstyle
Do
Stomach muscle
Ab
Hello
Hi
Stephen King novel
It
Meditation word
Om
Woodcutter's tool
Ax
Psyche component
Id
Clue
Answer
Italian river
Po
Martial artist's long staff
Bo
Chicago railway
El
Beast of burden
Ox
Kipling poem
If
Egyptian sun god
Ra
Former spouse
Ex
Chinese strategy game
Go
Thanks, in Britain
Ta
Sound of hesitation
Um
Clue
Answer
A note to follow Sol
La
Australia
Oz
Measure of acidity
pH
__! MTV Raps
Yo
One of the "Little Women"
Jo
Be quiet!
Sh
Karate uniform
Gi
Archaic spelling of "the"
Ye
Santa's syllable
Ho
Chinese life force
Qi
+1
level 83
Mar 11, 2014
Er for sound of hesitation?
+1
level 44
Jun 7, 2014
My thoughts exactly. And also "hm" of "eh".
+1
level ∞
Feb 8, 2016
Er will work now.
+1
level 21
Aug 7, 2016
Err is the sound of hesitation.
+3
level 73
Sep 3, 2018
I think you made a mistake.
+1
level 77
Aug 7, 2016
eh..
+1
level 77
Aug 7, 2016
ah...
+2
level 72
Mar 21, 2014
Would "archaic word for "the"" be a better clue? I kept thinking of a different way to spell 'the', rather a different word for 'the'.
+3
level 36
Mar 21, 2014
it was always pronounced 'the' however rather than using 'th' they had a symbol called a thorn which looked much like a modern day 'Y'. Also the 'e' on the end of old English words shouldn't be pronounced so 'ye olde sweet shoppe' should be pronounced ' the old sweet shop'. Stephen Fry said so on QI so it must be true!
+1
level 84
Oct 7, 2014
the "y" is actually the lower case theta from the greek alphabet - pronounced "th". It was used by printers when type-setting/spacing words to fit.
+1
level 49
Mar 21, 2014
In a lot of old printed manuscripts, the word "þe" was typeset as "ye" when the press ran out of þ's. I've also seen words like "world" typeset as "vvorld" when the press ran out of w's. I'm not sure I'd call it an "alternate spelling", though. The reader was supposed to look at the page and see the correct spelling. He could even correct it by hand using a pen. So it's more along the lines of an "alternate typesetting", or perhaps a "tolerated typo".
+3
level 42
Aug 7, 2016
'ye' is actually 'þe' (which is pronounced the same as the), however in the Tudor period the shorthand for 'þe' looked an awful lot like 'ye' because their script was so fancy, so people got confused and started writing 'ye' instead.
+2
level 66
Aug 8, 2016
Not to be picky, but Þþ is the unvoiced sound (as in think and thorn) and Ðð is the voiced sound (as in the and this). These letters are still retained in Icelandic (and Ðð in Faroese).
+7
level 36
Mar 21, 2014
Is it just me or is Ax spelt Axe? Also Ab is not a word but an abbreviation of Abdominal.
+4
level 34
Mar 21, 2014
i was fairly sure its axe
+1
level 73
Sep 3, 2018
Aks-eh? Whye insistt onn ah superfluouss letterre or twoo?
+1
level 61
Apr 9, 2019
You mean like hous mous spous brows (im starting to get stuck in a certain sound but the english language (languag...) is riddled with unnecessary letters....
+3
level 61
Mar 24, 2014
It is most definitely axe not ax.
+4
level 73
Mar 25, 2014
Thought you guys would enjoy this: http://grammarist.com/spelling/ax-axe/
+2
level 52
Aug 8, 2016
Have you never played scrabble?
+1
level 18
Dec 17, 2014
I totally agree.
+3
level 67
Aug 7, 2016
So, "Axe" is the CORRECT spelling. "Ax" is the American, ie WRONG, spelling! Just because an entire country chooses to spell a word incorrectly, doesn't mean it's suddenly acceptable!
+5
level 69
Aug 7, 2016
Whilst not being an American myself and thus invariably spelling the word 'axe', why is American spelling wrong? In my experience the people who are most anti-American spelling share a similar antipathy with the US's continued refusal to adopt the metric system. If it makes sense to adopt a newer, more logical system of weights and measures over the traditional system that evolved ad hoc over time, then why does the same reasoning not apply to the language? Why not adopt a more logical set of spellings that more closely reflect the way the words are actually pronounced? English spelling was only formalised in the language's homeland slowly over several centuries and changed multiple times in that period. If past spellings changed so frequently, what's so special about the set we used in the 19th century that they should be preserved into perpetuity?
+2
level 49
Aug 8, 2016
Amen, Findlay
+2
level 79
Jun 14, 2018
Findlay, you are my hero. In the small, strange world of my own creation logic, practicality, and common sense are more important than stubbornly holding on to unquestioned traditional ideas and an "I'm right so that makes you wrong" attitude. May I also point out that if someone had tried to type in their chosen spelling of "axe", it would have been accepted as a correct answer after they typed in just the "ax" part and solved the problem for everyone. I also get that you're saying that the US is stuck in the past with it's weights and measures while the UK is stuck there with their outdated spelling. Seems we both live in glass houses.
+2
level 73
Sep 3, 2018
@Algernon Start spelling English in(n) a remotely logical fashion and we'll (wheel) talk. The world (whirled) will follow.
+1
level 66
Aug 5, 2019
American here. I think that most people spell it as “Axe” nowadays, but it’s accepted that it could be spelled either way.
+1
level 63
Aug 1, 2017
Axe
+2
level 67
Jun 28, 2018
Eh, lots of words are abbreviations. Why, just the other day I was riding in a taximeter cabriolet since my car was out of gasoline/petroleum and saw an advertisement on the side of an omnibus for a new television situation comedy about this very thing. It struck me so much that I took a photograph of it with the camera obscura on my cellular telephone to post on my weblog once I got back to my dormitory's computer laboratory. Afterwards, I stopped at the gymnasium to ride the bicycle while studying for my mathematics examination the next day. Once I got home, I took off my brassiere and pantaloons, got some food out of the refrigerator, and planned my weekend trip to the zoological garden, to see the chimpanzees, rhinoceroses, and hippopotami.
+1
level 63
Mar 21, 2014
Oh man, only 14% for Kipling's "If"? It's a great poem - look it up if you haven't read it before!
+1
level 62
Mar 21, 2014
I agree. After Homer, Kipling's the manliest poet around.
+1
level 67
Jun 28, 2018
Agree too with irish14. A BBC survey showed "If" to be the most popular poem written in the English language. How come only 14% of jetpunkers have heard of it?
+2
level 71
Mar 21, 2014
Nice work...that was good. Following up on the comments above, AX & AXE are both acceptable spellings of the word. Also, the title of the quiz says "two letter answers" not "two letter words" so AB regardless of the fact that it's an abbreviation works.
+1
level 48
Oct 9, 2014
Exactly. Just as pH is not a word, but an abbreviation for "power of Hydrogen" (if memory serves), yet the majority correctly supply that as a two-letter answer.
+1
level 48
Mar 24, 2014
I even tried rubbing my earlobes and couldn't come up with Om
+1
level 76
Sep 12, 2014
I thought the word was aum. I tried am, um, and then gave up.
+1
level 61
Apr 9, 2019
We know it as ohm
+1
level 19
Apr 8, 2014
Nice quiz! "If" is my favorite Kipling poem.
+4
level 72
May 13, 2014
Er ... are you sure there isn't another two-letter answer for hesitation?
+1
level 18
Dec 17, 2014
Hahaha! I get it!
+1
level 73
Sep 3, 2018
Hm
+1
level 61
Apr 9, 2019
That is pondering, not hesitating
+1
level 55
Oct 28, 2015
What about Um for hesitation and Ur for ancient city of Mesopotamia?
+1
level 48
Feb 20, 2016
Just FYI, the correct spelling for the musical syllable is "sol"
+1
level 63
Aug 7, 2016
It SO isn't... It's "So", 'cos it's supposed to sound like "Sew - a needle pulling thread"...
+2
level 73
Aug 8, 2016
As hard as it may be to believe..."The Sound of Music" got it wrong.
+1
level 47
Jul 19, 2016
Doesn't anyone else remember the DA from the 50's? (That's the guys' duck ass hairstyle - combed back on both sides to form a little point at the nape of the neck).
+1
level 76
May 15, 2017
I remember them, and all the Vitalis and Brylcreem ads that went along with them. "A little dab'll do ya." One of my brothers had the DA, the other had a flat top. Thank goodness the Beatles pushed them both out of style.
+1
level 61
Apr 9, 2019
Duck ass hahaha that s the funniest thing i ve heard in a while :D and i can picture it now, with the little swirl/twirl. Too funny hahah
+1
level 77
Aug 7, 2016
I think Xi for Qi (Chi) and Ki for Gi are both found in the Scrabble dictionary. It's been a while since I looked.
+1
level 63
Aug 7, 2016
Do - re - me - fa - so - la - ti - do! Not "Sol"... haha
+1
level 78
Aug 7, 2016
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_note#History_of_note_names : "In Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, Romanian, Greek, Russian, Mongolian, Flemish, Persian, Arabic, Hebrew, Ukrainian, Bulgarian and Turkish notation the notes of scales are given in terms of Do-Re-Mi-Fa-Sol-La-Si rather than C-D-E-F-G-A-B. These names follow the original names reputedly given by Guido d'Arezzo, who had taken them from the first syllables of the first six musical phrases of a Gregorian Chant melody Ut queant laxis, which began on the appropriate scale degrees. These became the basis of the solfege system. "Do" later replaced the original "Ut" for ease of singing (most likely from the beginning of Dominus, Lord), though "Ut" is still used in some places. "Si" or "Ti" was added as the seventh degree (from Sancte Johannes, St. John, to whom the hymn is dedicated). The use of "Si" versus "Ti" varies regionally."
+1
level 66
Aug 7, 2016
Oh, that's what it was about. I thought the answer should be CW, as in clockwise. Because it's the same direction the sun goes over the sky.
+2
level 67
Oct 27, 2016
Here in Australia the Sun goes anti-clockwise.
+3
level 67
Aug 7, 2016
I feel like "Australia" isn't a very good hint for "Oz." Aside from the fact that I've literally never heard that anywhere before, it would make a lot more sense as a hint for Australia's common abbreviation AU. How about making it a Wizard of Oz reference instead?
+2
level 72
Aug 7, 2016
The fact that you have never heard it does not make it incorrect
+2
level 52
Aug 8, 2016
Well I live in Oz and it's how we always say it!
+3
level 22
Sep 15, 2016
To be fair, I live in Australia and didn't think of Oz, rather Au It's a tad bogan and over used
+1
level 58
Mar 20, 2019
See, my first thought was "Oi". Because of Aussi! Aussi! Aussi! Oi! Oi! Oi! But, I'm a stupid American so...
+1
level 61
Apr 9, 2019
How can you never have heard of it?? Never watched tv read a book or been on the internet?? Ow wait ..

it is almost like saying what is usa, i ve never heard of it

+1
level 61
Aug 8, 2016
I think the correct lyric is "a note to follow So"
+1
level 76
May 15, 2017
Nope. It's from the tonic sol-fa scale. When you say sol and then la it may sound as though there's only one l, but sol is correct.
+1
level 44
Aug 8, 2016
Ye is more commonly a pronoun for you or thou.
+1
level 38
Aug 9, 2016
I thought of "ty" for the 'Thanks, in Britan' question lol
+1
level 43
Aug 11, 2016
Playing Scrabble helped with this one. I love my two letter words.
+1
level 29
Aug 14, 2016
I said Lo. But it didn't work. Its fine but u might need to change it. Just think if Edward Snowden comes along and types in lo and it doesn't work. So plz change it.
+1
level 57
Dec 28, 2016
Since when in music is tit 'sol'? I thought it was 'so'
+1
level 40
May 15, 2017
Ta? i'm British, I've never said "Ta" never met someone who says it either
+1
level 76
Mar 8, 2018
Have you ever been to Nottinghamshire?
+1
level 79
Jun 14, 2018
I've also heard it in Yorkshire and Lancashire.
+1
level 17
Apr 11, 2018
it is an AXE by the way
+1
level 38
Apr 11, 2018
Wow I actually got qi.
+1
level 38
May 31, 2018
"Ye" is archaic for "you", not "the", as in "Come all ye faithful..."
+1
level 73
May 31, 2018
Actually that's a pretty common misconception. The "Y" in Ye, is actually not a "Y" at all. It's an archaic letter called "thorn" which was a letter that by the 15th century looked similar to a modern "Y." The thorn is the letter that actually give us the "th" sound. It used to be its own letter but because of over hundreds of years of sloppy transcriptions, the thorn started to look like "Y" so the "Y" would be substituted for it until eventually, like other archaic letters, the thorn faded into obscurity. So the next time you walk by "ye olde drug store" you too can be a pendant and call it "the old drug store" just like it was originally intended.
+1
level 35
Jan 26, 2019
Qi is an awesome scrabble word
+1
level 61
Apr 9, 2019
Im surpised at the low percentages !! (I got 25 right but knew bo aswell, just couldnt get to it in time) most of the ones below 50% i would ve expected to be near 80%
+1
level 61
Aug 26, 2019
Did get bo this time, but still no idea about the same bunch, if, jo, gi and el.
+1
level 62
May 31, 2019
You would just type in all 676 answers to the ones you didnt know and get al of them