American vs British Prepositions

For each American English preposition usage identify the common British English equivalent.
This is about common usage. Language is of course not contained by borders.
That said, comment if you disagree!
Quiz by overtired
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Last updated: May 19, 2021
First submittedMay 18, 2021
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1. American: She's on the hockey team
     British:
She's in the hockey team
She's for the hockey team
She's at the hockey team
2. American: I dropped my phone on accident
     British:
I dropped my phone by accident
I dropped my phone from accident
I dropped my phone through accident
3. American: I'm planning to go biking on the weekend
     British:
I'm planning to go biking at the weekend
I'm planning to go biking about the weekend
I'm planning to go biking of the weekend
4. American: Jack is different than his sister
     British:
Jack is different by his sister
Jack is different of his sister
Jack is different to his sister
5. American: You can call me at this number
     British:
You can call me wherefore this number
You can call me with this number
You can call me on this number
6. American: Today's football game was rained out
     British:
Today's football game was rained over
Today's football game was rained away
Today's football game was rained off
7. American: He enrolled in the new course
     British:
He enrolled on the new course
He enrolled under the new course
He enrolled for the new course
8. American: The exhibition is open starting on Tuesday
     British:
The exhibition is open ere Tuesday
The exhibition is open at Tuesday
The exhibition is open from Tuesday
9. American: I'm writing my friend in Rome
     British:
I'm writing off my friend in Rome
I'm writing at my friend in Rome
I'm writing to my friend in Rome
10. American: They studied Spanish in high school
       British:
They studied Spanish through high school
They studied Spanish at high school
They studied Spanish betwixt high school
+1
Level 62
May 18, 2021
Great quiz!
+1
Level 81
May 18, 2021
Thanks!
+3
Level 68
May 18, 2021
As an American, I've always heard

1) I am writing to my friend.

2. I dropped my phone by accident

+1
Level 81
May 18, 2021
That's weird, I've heard Americans use both many times. Heard "on accident" just a few days ago. Maybe they are area dependent? (That person was in San Francisco.) Or slang?

How about "write me"? That's maybe a more common version of it that I've heard, as in "Don't forget to write me".

+1
Level 54
May 19, 2021
as an american i would say:you can call me at this #. i have never heard -on this # Fun quiz
+2
Level 81
May 19, 2021
Thanks, had the American and British the wrong way round in the question. Call me on is common in the UK. Have corrected it.
+1
Level 56
Jul 3, 2021
It's different *from*, not different *to*. I guess you were a bit sleep-deprived when you dreamt that one up, overtired
+1
Level 81
Jul 3, 2021
"Different from" and "different to" are both standard in British English. The former is also used in American English, hence me using the latter.