Chuck Berry Charting Songs (Billboard Hot 100)

Figure out every charting song from this influential rock and roll musician
Only includes songs that charted on the Billboard Hot 100 AFTER its creation in August 1958.
All songs taken from Chuck Berry Chart History page on Billboard website.
Quiz by benjisarocks21
Rate:
Last updated: January 5, 2021
First submittedOctober 29, 2019
Times taken4
Report this quizReport
5:00
Enter answer here
0
 / 21 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Album
Weeks On
Peak
Song
The London Chuck Berry Sessions
17 Weeks
#1 (2 Weeks)
My Ding-a-Ling
St. Louis to Liverpool
11 Weeks
#10
No Particular Place to Go
Non-Album Single
9 Weeks
#10
Run Rudolph Run
St. Louis to Liverpool
9 Weeks
#14
You Can Never Tell
Chuck Berry Is on Top
10 Weeks
#18
Carol
Non-Album Single
10 Weeks
#23
Nadine (Is It You?)
The London Chuck Berry Sessions
13 Weeks
#27
Reelin' & Rockin'
Chuck Berry Is on Top
13 Weeks
#32
Almost Grown
Non-Album Single
8 Weeks
#37
Back in the U.S.A.
St. Louis to Liverpool
7 Weeks
#41
Promised Land
Rockin' at the Hops
6 Weeks
#42
Too Pooped to Pop
Chuck Berry Is on Top
9 Weeks
#47
Sweet Little Rock and Roller
St. Louis to Liverpool
6 Weeks
#54
Little Marie
Chuck Berry Is on Top
5 Weeks
#60
Anthony Boy
Rockin' at the Hops
8 Weeks
#64
Let It Rock
St. Louis to Liverpool
3 Weeks
#71
Merry Christmas Baby
Chuck Berry Is on Top
4 Weeks
#80
Little Queenie
Chuck Berry Is on Top
1 Week
#80
Johnny B. Goode
Non-Album Single
1 Week
#81
Beautiful Delilah
Chuck Berry Is on Top
5 Weeks
#83
Joe Joe Gunne
Chuck Berry in London
4 Weeks
#95
Dear Dad
+1
Level 48
Oct 29, 2019
OKAY-so what happened to Sweet Little 16 and Rock and Roll Music, both very big hits in the USA?
+1
Level 43
Nov 1, 2019
Rock and Roll Music charted in 1957, one year before the Billboard Hot 100 was created. Therefore, it is not included.

Similarly, Sweet Little Sixteen charted in January 1958, 6 months before the Hot 100 was created.

Also both are not included in the Chuck Berry chart history page on the Billboard website.

+1
Level 48
Nov 2, 2019
Billboard surveys were around long before Ricky Nelson's "Poor Little Fool" in August of 1958, was the first #1 record on the Hot 100. You cannot discount any music before that time because national surveys did exist. They calculated in a variety of ways. You have to go back before they started the HOT 100. They called it the Honor Roll of Hits. They were calculated from radio stations, jukeboxes, as well as record sales in stores. According to Billboard , Sweet Little 16 was #2, School Day was #3, Rock & Roll Music was #8, and Johnny B Goode was #8. These, beside My Ding-A-Ling, were Chuck Berry's biggest selling records. And I know, because I was around when they were released.
+1
Level 43
Nov 2, 2019
Ok I totally understand this and I get where you are coming from with this. In fact, I totally agree that those particular Chuck Berry songs should be mentioned by Billboard particularly on chart history pages. I have put a rule at the top of the quiz explaining this, but I am referring to the songs mentioned in the Chuck Berry chart history page on the current Billboard website, which only refers to the songs that charted on the Billboard Hot 100 after it was officially released in August 4th, 1958. I am fully aware that there were charts that existed before the Hot 100 was developed, and I am aware and will not discredit the fact that there were numerous Chuck Berry songs that became massive hits in the 50s before the Hot 100 was created. However, this quiz is specifically referring to the Chuck Berry songs that were hits after the Hot 100 was publicly released.

I'm so sorry if I've caused any confusion. Again, I get your point and I really should have explained myself better.

+1
Level 48
Nov 3, 2019
Thanks for responding.