Take another quiz >

US vs UK: Vocabulary

For each word or term used in the USA, can you give its British equivalent?
Last updated: September 06, 2018
Rate:
4:00
Enter answer here
0
 / 24 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers
The average score is
Your high score is
Your best time is remaining
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
US version
UK version
Trunk (of a car)
Boot
Hood (of a car)
Bonnet
Broil
Grill
Faucet
Tap
Cotton candy
Candy floss
Diaper
Nappy
Dish towel
Tea towel
Period (Punctuation)
Full Stop
US version
UK version
Fanny pack
Bum bag
Garbage can
Rubbish bin
Ladybug
Ladybird
Math
Maths
Parking lot
Car park
Teeter-totter
Seesaw
Gas station
Petrol station
Lumber (wood)
Timber
US version
UK version
Eraser
Rubber
Flashlight
Torch
Windshield
Windscreen
Counterclockwise
Anticlockwise
Vacation
Holiday
Mommy
Mummy
Pacifier (for a baby)
Dummy
Quarter note (music)
Crotchet
+1
level 57
Jul 14, 2015
It's a seesaw in America...
+1
level 47
Oct 23, 2016
I agree. Would have said seesaw for US and teeter-totter for UK.
+1
level 62
Apr 13, 2019
I've never heard the word teeter-totter in the UK.
+1
level 75
Dec 27, 2015
I always called it Fairy Floss.
+1
level 5
Feb 21, 2018
would have got all right but dint know what some ment in us
+1
level 17
May 31, 2018
One thing, a crotchet is one note, semi-breve is 4 notes, minum is two notes, quaver is a half note, and semi-quaver is quarter-note
+1
level 62
Apr 13, 2019
That's not right. Semi-breve is a whole note, minum is a half note, crotchet is a quarter note, quaver is an eighth note, semiquaver is a sixteenth note. In a standard bar of 4/4 there are four quarter notes (or four crotchets in the UK). It makes sense. The quiz is correct.
More Quizzes in this Series
Similar Quizzes by Tag