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Bible Quotes Quiz #2

Fill the blanks in these quotes from the Bible.
  • All quotes from the King James version
  • Quiz by Quizmaster - Nov 21, 2014
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Enter answers in the area marked "Enter missing words here".

You can enter any answer, at any time - they don't have to be in order

Punctuation and capitalization don't matter on JetPunk.

Verse
Quote
Matthew 7:7
seek, and ye shall find
Matthew 5:5
Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth
Psalm 23:4
Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil
Matthew 26:41
the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak
Matthew 6:24
No man can serve two masters
1 Timothy 6:10
For the love of money is the root of all evil
Genesis 4:9
Am I my brother's keeper?
Ecclesiastes 1:9
and there is no new thing under the sun
Matthew 19:24
It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a
rich man to enter into the kingdom of God
1 Timothy 6:12
Fight the good fight
Matthew 7:14
Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life
Daniel 5:27
Thou art weighed in the balances, and art found wanting
Jeremiah 17:9
The heart is deceitful above all things
Exodus 33:3
a land flowing with milk and honey
Matthew 7:6
neither cast ye your pearls before swine
Genesis 1:27
So God created man in his own image
Answer Stats
Verse
Quote
% Correct
Your %
(34)
Should accept "pigs" for swine.
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Feb 19, 2013
(28)
I disagree that "pigs" should be accepted. I cannot think of a single Bible translation that uses the term "pigs" in place of "swine". But please, correct me if I'm wrong.
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May 12, 2013
(26)
KJV uses Swine
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Mar 4, 2014
(26)
there are many English translations that use "pigs": ESV, NIV, GNT, CEV, WEB, NLT (after the 04 edition); of the ones I have access to only KJV and the 96 edition of the NLT uses "swine"
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Nov 5, 2014
(71)
Plus there is a comic strip called Pearls Before Swine. So...there's that...I guess.
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Nov 24, 2014
(43)
The story goes that Clare Booth Luce and Dorothy Parker, who disliked each other intensely, once found themselves both seeking to enter a room through a doorway that would permit only one person to enter at a time. "Age before beauty" said Luce, gesturing to Parker to go first. "Pearls before swine" said Parker as she walked in ahead.
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Feb 18, 2015
(46)
KJV uses swine, not pigs: https://www.biblegateway.com/quicksearch/?quicksearch=pearls+swine&qs_version=KJV
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Feb 18, 2015
(58)
As a non native English speaker, I first tried "pigs", which did not work, then I thought of the phrase in Latin "margaritas ante porcos", but it could not be pork... I also tried "hogs"... but I did not remember the word "swine". That's the most difficult part of the quiz: guess the words used in the common English translations, even if you know the quotes in your own language!
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Feb 20, 2015
(62)
I'm with Rufy. For the ones that have read the Bible in other languages asking for a specific translation is a bit unfair. We know some of the quotes, but we can't be expected to know about a particular translation. I's suggest accepting "pigs" for "swine", "humble" for "meek" and "guardian" for "keeper".
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Jul 26, 2016
(21)
ESV uses pigs and is one of the most used versions today.
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Jun 14, 2017
(44)
If you still keep up with these replies (which I doubt you do), "neither cast ye" is definitely King James, and in that translation it's "swine." Honestly though this quote wouldn't really be famous enough to put in a quiz on this site if not for the comic strip "Pearls Before Swine." So...yeah.
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Jul 7, 2015
(66)
I've never heard of the comic strip, but "pearls before swine" is a rather common phrase
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Oct 14, 2016
(46)
Yeah I knew the quote years before the comic strip. It's well-known along the lines of various Shakespeare quotes that have entered the vernacular and pop culture.
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Apr 18, 2017
(38)
"Pearls before pigs" doesn't have the same ring to it. The alliteration here seems to water down the quote.
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Jun 22, 2017
(40)
Darn, all but Jeremiah. Not bad for an atheist! :)
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Feb 19, 2013
(26)
I had to look up Jeremiah and I'm a preacher.
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Mar 4, 2014
(71)
That's the only one I missed.
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Feb 18, 2015
(30)
why do you bother?
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May 5, 2014
(43)
Some like me used to be Catholic, and why should you completely avoid the bible if you're Atheist? That's how the ignorant, annoying ones are around.
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Jan 15, 2015
(69)
Atheists tend to be more familiar with the Bible than religious people are. If you want to talk about ignorant and annoying, don't leave them out.
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Feb 18, 2015
(71)
What's the basis for your statement, "Atheists tend to be more familiar with the Bible than religious people are?" I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "religious people". Do you mean Christians in general, or ultraconservative Christians, or members of any religion? It may be true that for every atheist trying to prove a Christian wrong, there's a Christian trying to argue with them, both quoting from the Bible, but I would guess that most atheists don't read and study the Bible on a daily basis, and many Christians do. I don't read my Bible nearly as much as I should, but I'd guess I get much more exposure to it than most atheists, just by attending weekly church services and Bible studies. That still doesn't make me an expert by any means but I try to learn more each day. I've read parts of the "bibles" of other religions, but that doesn't mean I'm more familiar with say, the Quran, than a Muslim. I don't agree with your blanket statement.
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Apr 18, 2017
(69)
A tiny portion of Christians study the Bible daily. The vast overwhelming majority have never once read from it. I'm not talking about the 9 people in your Bible Study group, I mean all the 2 billion + people around the world who identify as Christian. Many atheists were former Christians who became atheists because they got to know the Bible too well. Then there are those who are just naturally inquisitive and want to know the reasons for things and understand truth and the nature of reality- these atheists tend to have a broad understanding of all religions as well as science. Meanwhile, the average mainstream theist tends to just go along with what they are told and are not very curious or the type to question things. And of course there are all the many non-Christian religious people out there who are of course more interested in their own religious traditions but not the Bible.
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Jun 18, 2017
(69)
I imagine that, in the future, as religious influence wanes and more and more people are non-believers... when it gets to the point where to be atheist is the default and belief in a god is seen as strange or different... at that point things might be reversed and then the people who tend to just go along with whatever they are told... most of them will be atheists. The small number of religious people left will be people who studied religious texts and believed them. But, for now, that's maybe only the case in places like Japan or Sweden.
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Jun 18, 2017
(16)
Missed the "root of all evil" bit, despite that ubiquitous sexist math joke. 13/15, also okay for an atheist. ;-)
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Feb 20, 2013
(46)
Almost didn't get the Jeremiah one.
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Mar 28, 2014
(36)
The love of money is the root of all KINDS of evil. King James is the only version I've seen that omits the word kinds. It would probably make the quiz more difficult while still being correct.
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Oct 16, 2014
(69)
It's hard knowing what words are correct in the Bible. There have been more errors discovered in the various copies we have than there are words in the Bible. But the King James version is by far the most well-known English translation.
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Feb 18, 2015
(61)
Major hyperbole, kalba.
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Feb 18, 2015
(69)
There's no hyperbole in that statement.

"There are more variations among our manuscripts than there are words in the New Testament."
Bart Ehrman (, Misquoting Jesus—The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why, first paperback edition (San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 2007), 7, 90.
Bart D. Ehrman /ərmən/ (born October 5, 1955) is an American New Testament scholar, currently the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a leading scholar in his field, having written and edited over 25 books, including three college textbooks, and has also achieved acclaim at the popular level, authoring five New York Times bestsellers. Ehrman's work focuses on textual criticism of the New Testament, the historical Jesus, and the development of early Christianity.

And while some sources claim the NIV Bible has outsold the King James version, it is not the most well-known, most quoted, or most read.
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Feb 18, 2015
(69)
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Feb 18, 2015
(61)
Oh, I totally believe you that the KJV is the most popular all-time English translation of the Bible. My issue of hyperbole was with the first statement. I know who Bart Ehrman is; believe it or not, I've read his work- Christians aren't necessarily closed-minded knuckle-dragging Neanderthals. My issue with the Ehrman quote is that an error and a variation aren't necessarily the same thing, and variations in the text don't indicate a lack of reliability. I completely agree that there are variations in the multitudes of manuscripts. Here's the thing though- it's not like one version of the Gospel of Matthew says "He is risen" and another says "He is in the tomb." The interesting thing is, the Greek manuscripts don't diverge wildly on matters of doctrine, whether in the Gospels, Acts, Epistles, or Revelation.
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Feb 18, 2015
(69)
If there is a variation from one manuscript to the next.... you don't think this is an error? How could that be? Was the original text written in the Choose Your Own Adventure format?

Some of the errors/variations (same thing) are extremely minor. Most of them are. Such as variations in spelling or word order. Others are pretty significant. That's not really the point, though. The point is we do not know exactly what the words of any of these books originally were, and this is a pretty appropriate point to raise when responding to people quibbling over minor differences in phrasing from one translation to the next. My statement as written was accurate.
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Feb 18, 2015
(72)
Interesting that you would misquote the quote from "Misquoting Jesus"....it's an example of how bias leads to false news (but I digress). JenkinsEar is absolutely correct in pointing out that variations and errors are not equivalent. JenkinsEar pointed out a (hypothetical) error -- 'He is risen' vs. 'He is in the tomb' -- obviously difference in meanings. An example of a variation would be the use of the word 'cattle' vs. the word 'beeves'. They mean the same thing, and as such are variations.....not errors.
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Mar 1, 2017
(69)
He's absolutely not correct, and if anyone here is biased it's obviously you. You believe that the creator of the Universe authored a book rife with contradictions that condones genocide, slavery, and genital mutilation, prescribes the death penalty for having sex with your girlfriend on her period, picking up sticks on a Saturday, or eating shrimp, and claims that the Earth, Universe, the sun, and light were created in 6 days, but not in that order. Also a man lived inside a fish and another man put every animal on Earth inside a boat for a year. And I'm biased.
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Jun 18, 2017
(55)
Someone doth protests too much, methinks.
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Jun 18, 2017
(14)
"Variation: a different form of something; variant" "Error: a deviation from accuracy or correctness; a mistake" "Variation =/= Error" Please don't yell at me, i'm sorry I said words. I'm not trying to get involved in this conversation or anything, just taking that straight out of the dictionary. I understand the dictionary might be wrong, just tell me if it is, but PLEASE don't get angry PLEASE, I'M SORRY! I DIDN'T MEAN TO DISAGREE WITH THE MIGHTY KAL! I'M SORRY!!! OKAY? I'M SORRY!!!
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Jun 18, 2017
(69)
You didn't disagree with me. You just don't get it. These thousands upon thousands upon thousands of "variations" are not simply different choices made by translators. They are in fact errors or distortions. Bart doesn't call them errors because we don't know which, if any, of the manuscripts are correct. Chances are NONE of them are. so... they are all just different errors. Most of these manuscripts were being copied from others in the same language. It's not as if these variations are just different choices of interpretation made in good faith. No. They are either clerical errors (spelling mistakes, word order mistakes, accidental omissions or duplications), or they are in some cases willful changes in meaning- embellishments or redactions of passages that didn't confirm the biases of whoever was writing it down. We have many obvious examples of the latter. And thought CB attempts to downplay the significance of these changes, while most are minor, some are extremely significant!
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Jun 19, 2017
(69)
@kiwi: you think I'm being insincere?

methinks someone doesn't know the meaning of this phrase.

Unless you're directing it at CB or Jenkins, in which case, yeah, you're probably right.
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Jun 19, 2017
(14)
You're talking about the dictionary, right? That is the only thing I ever made mention of and was the only thing I was ever talking about or even trying to hint on. All I did was simply give 2 straight up definitions of 2 single, individual, words, from the dictionary. I never gave my opinions or thoughts on anything, and I never once made even the slightest hint of talking about the Bible in any way shape or form.
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Jun 19, 2017
(14)
Wow I sound rude.
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Jun 19, 2017
(69)
and those dictionary definitions do not contradict at all what I was saying, if you read and understand what I am saying.
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Jun 20, 2017
(14)
Dude, Kal, like, I totally never said they contradicted what you said, and I like totally never said I didn't understand you. I actually understood what you were saying like 150%. The question is, do you understand what I'm saying? Not saying you don't, you may very well understand, but in case you don't, all I ever said, all I ever mentioned, was 2, count them, 2 simple, individual definitions. And that's all I ever talked about, and ever wanted to talk about. I never once mentioned or even hinted towards your encyclopedia of words. It's like me trying to hold a conversation with someone about icecream, but then they keep bringing up astronomy out of the blue, and how Pluto is or is not a planet. All I'm talking about, is the icecream. I haven't been talking about your astronomy at all. I never said anything about it. I understand your astronomy, even though im not talking about it. But do you, Good Sir Kal, understand my icecream???
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Jun 20, 2017
(47)
Some absolutely beautiful words quoted in this quiz!
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Feb 18, 2015
(64)
Did anyone else try "blessed are the cheesemakers"?
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Feb 18, 2015
(65)
"Line on the right, one cross each"
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Feb 19, 2015
(65)
LOL!
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Jun 18, 2017
(66)
Are you from Wisconsin, BalsoSnell? :D
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Feb 20, 2015
(46)
No, but he may be Greek. It seems they're going to inherit the Earth. I was hoping they'd get something.
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Apr 18, 2017
(55)
I'm Jewish and I got all of the ones in the Five Books of Moses and none from the rest.
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Feb 18, 2015
(38)
The quote is actually that the love of money is the "root of all kinds of evil." Big difference.
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Feb 21, 2015
(71)
Nowadays it's shortened even more to "Money is the root of all evil."
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Jun 21, 2017
(62)
Straight rather than strait.
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Sep 26, 2015
(71)
No, it's strait. 'Strait' in this context means 'narrow'.
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Nov 17, 2015
(69)
I always find the image of a camel going through the eye of a needle really rather funny. It's probably just me.
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Nov 5, 2015
(55)
I tried rich man going through the eye of the needle... Oh wait.
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Jun 18, 2017
(55)
13/16 Not bad - and I'm the Pope
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Nov 17, 2015
(62)
Most if not all of these quotes are used in English literature as well as in daily speech. British people are so used to hearing them (that goes for Australians and Kiwis too) that being derived from the Bible becomes secondary. They are as many non-biblical proverbs that have become part of the inherent language. It is similar to Shakespeare's quotes, many people use Shakespeare quotes and invented words that have never read Shakespeare, they are just part of general knowledge of the English language .
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Jun 18, 2017
(69)
It's not any different in the USA.
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Jun 18, 2017
(56)
I only knew "The heart is deceitful above all things" 'cos it's a film and I've got it on DVD :)
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Jun 18, 2017
(32)
I halfheartedly tried 'raisin' for the one about going through a needle. It was funny. Then I realised that it is funny WHICHEVER QUOTE YOU INSERT IT INTO. Try it!
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Jun 18, 2017
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