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Neologisms #2

Based on the definitions, guess these words that have entered the lexicon in the last 20 years or so.
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Enter answers in the area marked "Enter answer here".

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Definition
Word
A post on Twitter
Smiley face or other ideogram such as 😀 or ❤️
To spoil a photograph by unexpectedly appearing in it
To send someone a text of a sexual nature
The wife or girlfriend of a prominent athlete
"Landscaping" of a man's body hair
Leggings that resemble jeans
Hypothetical future robot of incredibly small size
Hairstyle resembling a mohawk, but where the sides of the head aren't shaved
To dance in a provocative manner, with thrusting hips in a low stance
It's either a large smartphone or a small tablet
Whip cream container used to get high off nitrous oxide
The practice of dressing up like a character from a movie, video game, or anime
Three-letter expression of disinterest, popularized by the Simpsons
To look something up using a search engine
A vegetarian who will sometimes be "flexible" and eat meat
To participate in live-action role-playing
Word used to denote the action of eating. Similar to zzz for sleeping.
One who posts provocative messages on the internet in order to cause disruption
To put one's hand to one's face in an expression of dismay
Answer Stats
Definition
Word
% Correct
Your %
(71)
oh...put one's hand to one's OWN face...i was trying to think of the term for "talk to the hand"
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Oct 14, 2013
(46)
lol
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Jan 25, 2014
(51)
That was my 1st thought too, but even before I began to write I figured it out.
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Jan 25, 2014
(64)
Same here.
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Mar 3, 2017
(59)
Phablet sounds to me like "Phteven": http://9gag.com/gag/a09K5nv
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Jan 25, 2014
(35)
I wouldn't say twerking is provocative xD
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Jan 29, 2014
(77)
Are you under 25? Cuz that's why you don't think twerking is provocative.
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Mar 21, 2014
(71)
It certainly provokes a reaction in me when that Cyrus creature does it. Not a good reaction, but definitely a reaction...
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Aug 1, 2014
(60)
Lmao
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Mar 4, 2017
(66)
"that Cyrus creature"....bwaahahahaha!!! That was awesome!
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Apr 27, 2017
(37)
Whippits have been arounds since pressurized whip cream. (LOL!)
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Jan 30, 2014
(66)
Kinda stretches the "or so" to the extreme...
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Oct 11, 2016
(56)
I thought the same thing. I'm pretty sure I uttered the word "whippit" around the same time I said "hey, did I leave my Public Enemy tape in your car?"
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Mar 3, 2017
(65)
Yeah, I was gonna say, I can personally attest that whippets were around (and called whippets) and known in my part of the college partying scene in Boston 30 years ago. I'd guess they go back pretty far… Recreational use of nitrous itself started in the early 1800s. So yeah, as JuliaMM said, I assume the name came out right when canned whipped cream did, which seems to me like it'd be in the 50s, for how much they loooooved "kitchen convenience". I can find no proof of this, only that the mini canisters were already in common use for military applications by then, so it would not have been a huge technological leap or anything.
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Dec 17, 2016
(67)
Whippits were definitely a thing & called whippits at Penn State in 1985.
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Mar 3, 2017
(6)
You should accept "Cheaters" for vegetarians that are flexible and eat meat
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May 13, 2014
(51)
Or 'liars'. It's like saying, "I'm not a muderer, but every once in a while..."
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Nov 9, 2014
(57)
Only got 6 right and I couldn't be happier.
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Jul 8, 2014
(55)
I have the same with 7.
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Mar 3, 2017
(31)
i thought "do'h" for the simpsons one
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Aug 18, 2014
(64)
that's more of an expression of frustration or disappointment than disinterest
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Apr 26, 2016
(71)
Never heard of half of these. I have enough trouble remembering the words I already know without adding to the list, but I'll do my best to catch up.
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Mar 4, 2015
(64)
I'm with you, I have never heard the term wag before
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Apr 26, 2016
(68)
Wives And Girlfriends
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Mar 5, 2017
(69)
So THAT'S where the word "meh" came from. I picked it up off my sister a while back. She's never watched the Simpsons either, so I have no idea where she got it from.
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Dec 1, 2015
(64)
I never thought of it as coming from the Simpsons. They certainly used it but I had no idea they "popularized" it
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Apr 26, 2016
(44)
A LOT of words and phrases have come from The Simpsons. The show's been running since 1989 and it's still going, making it the longest-running TV show in history. It's therefore not surprising that many folks (myself included) use phrases from The Simpsons without knowing that's where they came from, since they've become part of the general lexicon (same with Star Trek and Star Wars).
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Mar 16, 2017
(49)
MasterKenobi: "The show's been running since 1989 and it's still going, making it the longest-running TV show in history. " Sorry Man, but Coronation Street has been on since 1960 and Guiding Light went from 1952-2009. Hell, As the World Turns was on for 54 years. Sure they are soap operas, but they are still television shows.
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May 4, 2017
(56)
Not sure if "tweet" can be properly called a neologism...
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Mar 27, 2016
(64)
In the context of twitter it certainly is. entirely differnt definition from the original word
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Apr 26, 2016
(68)
Agreed.
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Dec 4, 2016
(68)
The OED says that a neologism is a new word or phrase, not a new definition for a word that already existed.
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Mar 3, 2017
(68)
and Merriam-Webster says "a new word, usage, or expression". Interesting philosophical question - are homonyms different words or the same word that just happens to have different meanings?
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Mar 3, 2017
(68)
Same with "troll".
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Mar 3, 2017
(44)
And wag. These three words have been around for centuries, just not with these more current definitions.
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Mar 17, 2017
(28)
???????
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Apr 22, 2016
(43)
Loving the description to explain language that seems so familiar to us.
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Aug 22, 2016
(79)
Three-letter expression of disinterest: the word disinterest used here is incorrect. Disinterest means unbiased. You want "lack of interest" here to convey the correct definition. If you need a way to remember it, try this: you would like a judge to be disinterested, but not uninterested.
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Oct 9, 2016
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/disinterest
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Oct 9, 2016
(73)
Never heard of Google. I bing things up.
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Oct 9, 2016
(73)
Any chance on accepting nanite?
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Nov 17, 2016
(9)
kind of hard
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Nov 27, 2016
(68)
Got everything but wag, which I had never heard of. I looked it up, I get that it's an acronym for "wives and girlfriends", read about the origin on Wikipedia... and I still don't understand why it only applies to the wives and girlfriends of athletes. Why are all other wags not wags?
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Jan 21, 2017
(28)
love this quiz
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Mar 3, 2017
(28)
i had to search up what a neologism was though...0
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Mar 3, 2017
(45)
Please accept Trump on "One who posts provocative messages on the internet in order to cause disruption"!
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Mar 3, 2017
(46)
He is but an example of a troll.
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Mar 3, 2017
(57)
I've only used "nom" when the food was actually delicious.
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Mar 3, 2017
(44)
I'd say Troll isn't a neologism and certainly hasn't entered the dictionary only in the last 20 years. However, if it was the verb "to troll" it'd probably be valid.
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Mar 3, 2017
(45)
This was fun and so easy. I got 17/20 and my 11 year old got them all but whipits which I'm ok with lol
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Mar 3, 2017
(38)
Proud to say I only got 9
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Mar 3, 2017
(44)
"Chargers" be acceptable for the nitrous oxide one.
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Mar 3, 2017
(33)
"Flexitarian" meaning I still want to eat meat but still want the attention of being a vegetarian.
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Mar 3, 2017
(71)
I find it interesting that cavemen communicated by drawing pictures on their cave walls. Eons later we are again communicating with pictures, only we call them emojis. :)
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Mar 4, 2017
(49)
13/20. I'm so old.....
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Mar 6, 2017
(25)
I tried to type d'oh so many times for the Simpsons thing
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Mar 10, 2017
(44)
Ditto
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Mar 17, 2017
(66)
This quiz sadly reminds me how stupid the world is getting. Mindless slang is taking over, terrible diction/grammar gets validated instead of corrected, since anyone who DARES offer any sort of correction whatsoever is immediately branded a grammar-Nazi or some such thing.....*sigh*

People could care less about what word they should of used, irregardless of whether or not it jives with what proper verbage would dictate. Their just so careless with there grammar, that when you hone in on the problem, its just heart-wrenching and leaves a pit in your stomach too see hear, they're and everywhere.

Okay, that was cathartic.
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Apr 27, 2017
(26)
People don't type perfectly on the internet to save time. Get over it.
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Jul 21, 2017
(30)
I wrote num instead of nom...seriously, this isn't a proper word so some flexibility should be allowed in the spelling
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Jul 25, 2017
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