Take another quiz >
thumb

One-Name Historical Figures Quiz

These historical figures are often known by a single name. Guess who they are.
Give Up?
Enter name here:
0 / 24 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored /24 = %.
This beats or equals % of test takers
The average score is
Your high score is
Your best time is remaining
Points
You have earned / 5 points for this quiz
This quiz is not eligible for points
Next Level
/
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
×
Help

Enter answers in the area marked "Enter name here".

You can enter any answer, at any time - they don't have to be in order

Punctuation and capitalization don't matter on JetPunk.

Clue
Person
The Sistine Chapel
Christian messiah
Founded the Academy of Athens
"The Divine Comedy"
Carthaginian general
Fiddled while Rome burned
"The Iliad"
"Candide"
3-time World Cup winner
Lewis & Clark guide
Founder of Islam
Nemesis of the Crusaders
Clue
Person
Cried "Eureka!"
Greek writer of fables
She saved John Smith
Japanese emperor during WWII
He built a wall in northern England
Macedonian conqueror of Persia
Young pharaoh who was dug up in 1922
Roman orator and republican
Aztec emperor defeated by Cortes
Great Frankish King
Lover of Caesar and Antony
Nonviolent Indian
Answer Stats
Clue
Person
% Correct
Your %
(8)
I love Wikipedia. I've been using it for years and except the occasional grammatical error, it has never steered me wrong once. So quit bagging on Wikipedia.
reply
delete
Dec 28, 2011
(28)
That still does not make it an academic source. That's why it requires references.
reply
delete
Aug 31, 2012
(71)
Everything requires references. All of my text books and my engineering codes all have references in them. How is it different? I've found more mistakes in my old text books than I have on Wikipedia. You know why? Text books only have a handful of editors. Wikipedia has millions!
delete
Jun 8, 2013
(30)
Any academic source should have a list of references. If completely original, it should have a list of research performed to attain the conclusions. If it has no resources, it is also not an academic source, so no. Also, no one is saying it IS an academic source. But this is also not an academic website. It is a fun quiz website. Since when did jetpunk need to cite academia?
delete
May 22, 2014
(69)
I've found errors on Wikipedia before. Not saying it's a bad source, though the quality of the pages does vary a lot.
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(28)
musicmakes....just because most people are dumb and don't know the TRUE spelling of someone's name, doesn't mean we need to perpetuate the falsehood when the truth is known to us.
reply
delete
Dec 28, 2011
(69)
you guys both sound foolish, tbh.
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(70)
Speaking of correct spellings, the quiz gives us "Japanese emperor" and "Aztec emporer". And I don't even need to consult Wikipedia to know which one is correct!
reply
delete
Dec 28, 2011
Haha, I can never spell that word. Fixed now. Thanks!
reply
delete
Dec 28, 2011
(28)
Was Muhammad really the founder of Islam? Huh, I thought it existed before him, for some reason. Shows how much I know... O_o
reply
delete
Dec 29, 2011
(30)
Nope. In fact, the only original difference between Shia and the Sunnis is that one believed the leader of Islam should be a direct descendant of Muhammad and the other believed it could be anyone. I always forget which is which, because it's probably the lamest reason for division and holy wars ever.
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(69)
According to Islamic tradition there are different contradictory answers to this question. Some say Muhammad was the first Muslim, some say Moses, some say Abraham, and some say Adam.

According to actual history and not mythology, most people would say Muhammad was the founder of Islam and that either Muhammad or Khadija (his wife and according to tradition the first convert) were the first Muslims. However, the historical record is a bit spotty and as is often the case with history that is religiously significant, probably corrupted and unreliable. Cases could be made for Abu Bakr the first caliph and Uthan bin Affan who both played roles similar to that of Paul in the Christian faith and later the council of Nicaea.
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(54)
"From the halls of Moctezuma to the shores......" Nah...
reply
delete
Dec 29, 2011
(14)
I only know Moctezuma from a old Cartoon Network show called Time Squad. It was such a ridiculous episode! "Ladies and Gentleman, Monty Zuma!" Nothing like changing an Aztec emperor from a comedian to an actual emperor.
reply
delete
Dec 30, 2011
(67)
Wikipedia is a great boon to all of us, there is no denying that! I use it constantly. I think however that many teachers are properly cautioning you, especially on more esoteric subjects. In my research I've found a few entries that were either wrong or had a very heavy editorial bent towards a specific viewpoint that might or might not be the accepted view or simply did not reflect known facts at all. One of them for a long time was the entry on the above mentioned emperor, Nero. If you'd read the original wikipedia entry on "Nero" you would have thought he was an all-around great guy who was one of Rome's greatest emperors... the historian who'd written the entry is one of a very few who like to ignore all the contemporary accounts from Nero's own time and create a "kinder gentler Nero". It's been modified some at this point, but it's still off center to a degree. Likewise, when researching some villages and towns in my county that the State of New York had forcibly moved people from in order to create som
reply
delete
Dec 31, 2011
(14)
It is a common misconception that Nero "Fiddled while Rome burned." The fiddle wasn't even invented yet. Also, he did a lot to help Rome and her people follow the disaster. Not that it really matters, because most people know him for this misconception, so the quiz is not flawed. Just helping people learn a bit of truth.
reply
delete
Jan 2, 2012
(69)
He did sing though... and he may or may not have set fire to the city himself or got his friend to do it, depending on who you read. Tacitus tries to present an unbiased account and fails dismally: he seems to believe that Nero wanted to build a new Rome, and so set fire to the old one. The new Rome was, admittedly, rather better, and much better for surviving fires, but the amount lost and the people killed weren't really worth it.
reply
delete
Nov 11, 2015
(14)
*followING
reply
delete
Jan 2, 2012
(72)
The quizmaster is correct about Moctezuma.
reply
delete
Feb 10, 2012
(17)
I'm surprised no one on here is arguing that Jesus does have a last name. For any future people that will, Christ comes from the latin word Christos, which means messiah. So really "Christ" is Jesus's title, not his name.
reply
delete
Feb 28, 2012
(69)
We all know his middle initial was H, though.
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(44)
Hahaha gold
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(33)
Thank you Age of Empires for the ancient people...
reply
delete
Jun 4, 2012
(52)
I've never heard of Moctezuma's revenge!
reply
delete
Jul 17, 2012
(65)
Try eating at McDonalds.
reply
delete
Mar 27, 2017
(40)
I missed "Saladin" because I used Salah ad-Din
reply
delete
Aug 1, 2012
(69)
This should be accepted but it never is. It's his proper Arabic name. Salah AlDin should also work. Or Salahuddin.
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(25)
can you please accept more spellings of sacagawea and pocahantas?
reply
delete
Nov 19, 2012
Ok
reply
delete
May 14, 2014
(65)
Apparently not enough alternate spellings accepted since I could never get all the vowels correctly ordered in "Pocahantas".
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(39)
I tried 'Virgil' for the Greek writer of fables. I guess he was a Roman though...
reply
delete
Mar 25, 2014
(69)
And he didn't write fables.
reply
delete
Dec 12, 2015
(66)
Must have tried 35 different spellings for Pocahontas. Not lobbying for including incorrect spellings, just expressing angst.
reply
delete
Mar 29, 2014
(65)
Pocahontas always makes me smile. For any of you who've ever seen/played the game "Password"....when I was a kid, my parents would play Password with my aunt and uncle. The Password was "dot". My mom is giving the clue to my aunt, and she just knows she's got a slam dunk, first-clue, 10-point winner. So she says, "Polka......" (extending the 2nd syllable to suggest that she wants the word that logically comes next) Without hesitating, my aunt enthusiastically responds, "Hontas!" To which, my mom, in utter disbelief replies, "What's a hontas?!!!" One of those crazy moments that becomes family legend. They're all gone now, but it still brings a smile to my face when I think of it. Such good, fun memories.
reply
delete
Mar 27, 2017
(46)
: )
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(27)
I'm amazed how little people knew Saladin. Surely they teach the Crusades in American Schools?
reply
delete
Mar 31, 2014
(33)
From what I have seen American schools mostly try to avoid teaching anything useful.
reply
delete
Apr 26, 2014
(28)
They did not teach us about him, the only reason I knew who he was is beacuse of Assassins Creed. I can honestly say that video games have taught me more than the american public education system, I'd be way smarter if I had just been left to my own devices and just allowed to play video games and read books all day.
delete
Jun 17, 2017
(69)
They do and I first learned about Saladin in such a school.
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(59)
Can't speak for others, but my schooling only gave very basic coverage to the Crusades - more or less when they were and what they were about. We didn't go into anywhere near as much detail as the subject deserves. I blame the fact that world history classes tended to teach the same stuff over and over again, because most of the students didn't retain from year to year.
reply
delete
Feb 24, 2017
Updated!
reply
delete
May 14, 2014
(25)
Michelangelo Buanarotti Dante Alighieri Mahatma Gandhi at least these ones are Not one name figures
reply
delete
May 18, 2014
Seriously? By the way, Mahatma wasn't his first name. That'd be like saying Winston Churchill's first name was Sir.
reply
delete
May 19, 2014
(25)
ok, may be. but other two are not for this list)
delete
May 19, 2014
(71)
Having two names and being known by two names are very different. Madonna HAS a last name, but nobody cares. If I say Madonna, you know who I'm talking about. Same goes with Dante and Michelangelo.
delete
May 21, 2014
(45)
Agree that Gandhi is often known by a single name, but I did feel like he stuck out like a sore thumb in this quiz. I'd say his actual first name (Mohandas) is much more well known than Dante's last.
delete
May 22, 2014
(25)
I also personally disagree with Gandhi's inclusion, although more for the reason that there are several other famous people who also had Gandhi as their last name (Indira, Rajiv, etc.) In a competitive quiz game, "Gandhi" would normally be prompted if you gave it as an answer to a question, for the very reason that that answer is ambiguous.
delete
Jun 15, 2017
(56)
I second Dante Alighieri. His surname is not that unknown.
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(53)
It may not be unknown, but it's not used nearly as often as just "Dante". And the quiz only requires that the person is often called by just one name.
delete
May 23, 2014
(61)
Also, it's his first name he is known by. Everybody knows who you mean when you say "Dickens" or "Shakespeare", and most people know they have a first name and what that name is. But Dante is this author's first name, that's why he's a special case. Nobody ever, ever says "Aligheri's Inferno". Same with Michelangelo.
delete
Feb 7, 2015
(69)
That's an impressive name. That, or it needs commas.
reply
delete
Dec 12, 2015
(65)
Commas, shmommas! Why convey your ideas clearly when you can obfuscate them with lazy grammar and punctuation?
delete
Mar 27, 2017
(28)
"Roman orator and republican"? There were simply too many of those. Please be more specific :)
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(69)
The Sistine Chapel clue was also vague... if you'd said "painter of the Sistine Chapel" I would have got it right away but I think first I guessed Peter (for his basilica) and Paul and then a couple popes before arriving at the painter of the ceiling.
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(58)
I also tried countless romans before giving up...the clue could be more useful and add some acheivement that is specific to Cicero.
reply
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(68)
Well, just a humble comment from a Mexican guy: The question about the Aztec emperor has the wrong answer. The correct one is Cuauhtémoc. Moctezuma II was indeed the emperor when Cortés arrived to Tenochtitlán, but he was overthrown by his people, beacuse he defended the Spaniards (believing their were gods). Then Cuitláhuac ascended to the throne, but he was soon killed by the fearmost weapon the Europeans had brought: Smallpox. After that, Cuauhtémoc was crowned tlatoani (emperor), and he still fought against the Spaniards. So technically he was the emperor defeated by Cortés, not Moctezuma (who was killed a year before the Spaniard victory).
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(71)
Either name should be accepted, since both were Aztec emperors killed during the Cortes expeditions, although Cuauhte'moc was the last emperor in charge when the empire fell.
reply
delete
Feb 24, 2017
(55)
doesn't Gandhi have a first name
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(53)
Yes, his name was Mohandas Gandhi, though I think use of his title "Mahatma" might be more common than Mohandas. But it says "often known by a single name", and that still applies.
reply
delete
May 23, 2014
(44)
I dont know why but I was trying to think of native americans for the peaceful indian clue. Ghandi never even crossed my mind
reply
delete
May 22, 2014
(45)
Who's this Ghandi guy? You might have had more luck with Gandhi though?
reply
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(48)
I was thinking American Indian. I kept trying Chief Josef.
reply
delete
May 24, 2014
(66)
I tried Squanto and Geronimo (only one-name Native Americans I could think of). Then I realized it was looking for an INDIAN Indian, not an American Indian. :D
reply
delete
Sep 24, 2014
(59)
I'd say this is a good reason for the term "American Indian" to be phased out. It's really not that descriptive, and can sometimes lead to confusion with just Indian is used. It's not about being PC, just being accurate.
reply
delete
Feb 24, 2017
(9)
Non violent Indian got me, I was focused on feather not dot lol
reply
delete
May 25, 2014
(21)
I really want to know why Saladin is only on 26%... :/
reply
delete
May 26, 2014
(43)
is it bad for nonviolent indian i thought of squanto?
reply
delete
May 28, 2014
(54)
Squanto is the name that came immediately to my mind too... had to think for a second before it dawned on me that they were referring to Gandhi...
reply
delete
Jun 15, 2014
(65)
I tried Squanto and Geronimo...
delete
Nov 18, 2014
(58)
Charlemagne wasn't great.
He destroyed value of money, entering a bad state monopoly
reply
delete
Jul 3, 2014
(66)
Charlemagne literally means Charles the Great. I think that's what the quiz is referencing. I assume very few of us have in-depth knowledge of medieval economic policy.
reply
delete
Dec 8, 2015
(58)
Not being an expert, but just reading about it, his economic reforms sound pretty good to me. Plus he had many other positive impacts on Western European culture. He was pretty great
reply
delete
Mar 25, 2016
(31)
'He built a wall in northern England' needs to accept Antoninus as well.
reply
delete
Feb 15, 2015
(46)
No. Antonius built a wall across Scotland, which is north of England, not IN the north of England.
reply
delete
Jun 13, 2015
(62)
Scotland was not Scotland when the Romans were in Britain. The major push (into what is now Scotland) by the Scots came about 500AD.
delete
Jan 2, 2016
(58)
I really wish people wouldn't make these kinds of comments. The idea is to get Hadrian not any person who built a wall in England. If the clue leads to more than one answer, then the clue is wrong not the answer.
reply
delete
Mar 25, 2016
(62)
Just for the record: Hadrian's Wall stretches across the north of England from the west Cumbrian Roman coastal defences at Ravenglass, through Whitehaven, Workington and Maryport to Bowness-on-Solway, along Hadrian's Wall through Carlisle to Hexham in Northumberland and on to Newcastle upon Tyne, Wallsend and South Shields.
reply
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(62)
First time I've ever heard of Sacagawea. I don't think she is a rellevant figure outside the US.
reply
delete
Oct 27, 2015
(58)
As with much of American culture, I only know about her from The Simpsons. Had a hell of a time trying to spell her name.
reply
delete
Mar 25, 2016
(59)
Glad i'm not the only one!
reply
delete
Aug 10, 2016
(54)
Well she guided Lewis and Clark, which was certainly notable.
reply
delete
Nov 8, 2016
(62)
Well it was to Lewis and Clark anyway.
delete
Feb 1, 2017
(32)
Well I have no idea who Lewis and Clark are.
delete
Jun 17, 2017
(72)
Lewis and Clark are not well-known outside the US either ;).
reply
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(62)
for nonviolent indian my first thought was chief joseph i will fight no more forever did eventually get gandhi
reply
delete
Dec 5, 2015
(61)
Hannibal Barca
reply
delete
Apr 13, 2016
(66)
Moliere should be totally included here
reply
delete
Dec 3, 2016
(37)
Gandhi has a first name, Mohandas but people also call him Mahatma which means "great soul"
reply
delete
Feb 1, 2017
(62)
The question was "Known As"......... not many people think of Gandhi as 'Mohandas'...... do they?
reply
delete
Feb 1, 2017
(56)
''Nonviolent Indian'' and ''The Sistine Chapel'' are very vague clues. ''3-time World Cup winner'' is also vague. Agree with others to define it more accurately. Thanks
reply
delete
Feb 24, 2017
(37)
Hannibal had a last name, his full name is Hannibal Barca...
reply
delete
Apr 25, 2017
(32)
I hear a lot of people call Gandhi by his full name: Mahatma, Gandhi.
reply
delete
Apr 25, 2017
(62)
Bully for you!
reply
delete
Apr 25, 2017
(65)
Malbaby: you missed the sarcasm. "I hear a lot of people" is a way of poking fun at Trump, who uses that phrase either to present something that the voices on Fox News or Breitbart told him or to disguise the fact that he doesn't know WTF he's talking about. http://www.cnn.com/2016/08/09/politics/donald-trump-conspiracy-many-people-are-saying/index.html. It's like ending an email message with the word "Sad!" as Trump does.
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(40)
What I appreciate about Wikipedia is that it updates its site almost before the event happens. Hours after Roger Moore's recent death, his bio on wikipedia was already updated... way before the printed media picked up on it.
reply
delete
May 25, 2017
(69)
as per usual: Salah al Din, Salah ad Din, Saleh al Din, Saleh ad Din, Salahuddin
reply
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(69)
which I guess makes the answer wrong, since these, more accurate, versions of his name show that he did have a a first and last name.. just mashed together and distorted
reply
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(62)
Known in the English speaking world as 'Saladin' which makes that answer correct.
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(44)
I think Salahuddin is more accurate then Saladin... It's like in the Satanic Verse, Saladin changing his name from Salahuddin to better appeal to western audiences.
reply
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(53)
Lol tried Tecumseh and Squanto for the nonviolent Indian one
reply
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(60)
There's more than one "Roman orator and republican" - e.g. Cato.
reply
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(45)
I'm pretty sure Gandhi's first name was Mohandas.
reply
delete
Jun 14, 2017
(38)
How is it possible, that Aesop is more known than Gandhi, Hadrian, Pelé, Hirohito, Hannibal and Archimedes; and even Sacagawea is more known than Charlemagne, Montezuma, Voltaire, Saladin and Cicero?! I would definitely think Aesop and Sacagawea would be by far the least known of all the mentioned.
reply
delete
Jun 15, 2017
(51)
Great quiz, terrible clues. It's sometimes hard to explain something without the bias of your own country's perspective.
reply
delete
Jun 15, 2017
(27)
Mostly easy, but good quiz.
reply
delete
Jun 15, 2017
×
Congrats!
You have reached a new level
To save this level, you'll have to
create an account
×
Congrats!
You have earned a new badge
To save this badge, you'll have to
create an account