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Random Italian Words

Translate these random Italian words into English.
  • All the answers are a single word
  • If multiple answers fit, guess the most common
  • Quiz by Quizmaster - Nov 02, 2016
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Italian
English
Ciao
Grazie
Venti
Fratello
Vino
Bianco
Giorno
Padre
Italian
English
Tutti
Grotta
Bambino
Primo
Ragazza
Oro
Latte
Molto
Italian
English
Signore
Canto
Forte
Mille
Donna
Cavallo
Benvenuto
Duce
Answer Stats
Italian
English
% Correct
Your %
(66)
facile! :)
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Oct 2, 2014
(73)
Could you accept Mister for Signore?
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Oct 2, 2014
Okay.
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Oct 3, 2014
(47)
Easy for an italian! :) But "Venti" means "winds" too, not only the number.
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Nov 4, 2014
(43)
Yes, I tried that too. Didn't even think about the number.
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Nov 20, 2014
(23)
Yes same with me, I just knew it as wind with 'venti' being wind spirits in Roman Mythology
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Nov 21, 2014
(57)
My first answer too.
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Feb 10, 2017
(34)
Can you accept grotto for grotta and chant for canto?
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Nov 20, 2014
(70)
Yes, why doesn't grotto work? I googled an English translation of grotta and cave was first, but next in order were grotto and cavern.
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Feb 9, 2017
(45)
I first tried 'sing' for canto, first person conjugation. But I did get it quickly.
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Feb 11, 2017
(61)
Can you accept morning for giorno? Buon giorno is good morning.
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Nov 20, 2014
(66)
giorno means day, not morning; it's like in Italy they say "good day" instead of "good morning" so I don't think morning should be accepted I'd accept "kid" for bambino
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Nov 20, 2014
(41)
Giorno is day. Mattina is morning.
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Nov 20, 2014
(27)
Finally music theory pays off!
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Nov 20, 2014
(46)
I was thinking the same thing, and French as well. Ragazza threw me off though..never would have guessed it means girl!
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Nov 20, 2014
(58)
french is so similar to this so its easy
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Nov 20, 2014
(49)
perhaps would have been better had it been vocab from a specific area e.g. family, going out, verbs.
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Nov 24, 2014
(31)
Canto can also mean "I sing". Could that be accepted? :)
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Dec 11, 2014
(71)
* All of the answers are a single word
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Feb 10, 2017
(18)
piacevole curiosità , signore
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May 19, 2015
(44)
Got the lot in about a minute. Mi piace molto la lingua italiana, quindi grazie mille per questo quiz! ;-)
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Mar 4, 2016
(9)
"duce" is an italian title given to Mussolini. The correct translation of leader is "capo"
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Jan 16, 2017
(43)
capo = boss
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Feb 10, 2017
(55)
I'd say 100% is pretty good for someone who used a combination of a limited knowledge of Spanish and historical and cultural clues.
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Feb 9, 2017
(56)
DUCE is not truly an Italian word. It derived from Latin word DUX (= leader, military chief) and was adopted by Mussolini as his personal title, since he got inspired by Roman Empire. Before fascist times, "duce" was an archaic and lost world. After fascist time, "duce" is almost only used to address to Mussolini (aka il Duce). So, I think it's a little misleading to put that word on a quiz like this. "Duce" in Italian Language has almost exactly the same value of "Fuhrer" in German: they both are not anymore vocabulary words, but they're instead historical related appellatives with a given strong negative characterization.
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Feb 9, 2017
(70)
You're wrong about Führer, it still means a guide, sometimes a driver.
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Feb 9, 2017
(57)
Well said.
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Feb 10, 2017
(43)
got all, with 2:05 left, and I´m not Italian
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Feb 10, 2017
(63)
Anyone else try "pizza" for "giorno"? No? Just me? Carry on.
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Feb 10, 2017
(55)
But why?
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Mar 10, 2017
(45)
Well, I learned something. I've only used 'ragazza/o' when referring to teenage girls/boys specifically. I guess I never had an Italian situation before when I needed to refer to a younger girl.
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Feb 11, 2017
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