Take another quiz >

Answers are Elements

All the answers are chemical elements. For each selected clue, guess the element.
Last updated: September 14, 2018
Rate:
5:00
Enter answer here:
0
 / 24 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %.
This beats or equals % of test takers
The average score is
Your high score is
Your best time is remaining
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Clue
Answer
All that glitters is not ...
Gold
Brimstone
Sulfur
Cold War divider of Europe
Iron Curtain
SpongeBob's network
Nickelodeon
Cary Grant movie
Arsenic and Old Lace
What powers a laptop
Lithium-ion battery
It's Christmas time in the city
Silver Bells
Green gas used in WWI
Chlorine
Limestone
Calcium Carbonate
Weapon from Clue
Lead Pipe
Messenger of the gods
Mercury
Most abundant element in
the earth's atmosphere
Nitrogen
Clue
Answer
Nickname of the Ford Model-T
Tin Lizzie
What blimps are filled with
Helium
Center of the technology industry
Silicon Valley
What CC stands for
Carbon Copy
Deficiency of this causes cretinism
Iodine
Most common element in the Universe
Hydrogen
Marilyn Monroe's hair color, at times
Platinum Blonde
What Coke cans are made of
Aluminum
Metal with the highest melting point
Tungsten
97.5% of a US penny
Zinc
The other 2.5% of a US penny
Copper
Radioactive element discovered
by the Curies
Radium
+6
level 20
Feb 26, 2013
Funny how Curies didn't discover Curium :P!
+15
level 50
May 12, 2015
Curius, really
+3
level 24
Feb 26, 2013
As an Englishman I am relieved you accepted Aluminium as a spelling.
+1
level 26
Feb 26, 2013
I kept trying "closed captioning" for "carbon copy" :P
+1
level 29
Mar 15, 2017
Cubic centimeters
+1
level 67
Nov 16, 2018
"Crowd control" for the gamers.
+1
level 44
Aug 19, 2013
You should also accept Wolfram for Tungsten.
+1
level 37
Oct 9, 2015
Yes! I never heard of tungsten. WOLFRAM please!
+1
level 57
May 9, 2016
Looking for this comment. I wanted to suggest that, too.
+2
level 24
Jul 8, 2016
wolfram is not an element, tungsten is an element, answers are elements therefor the answer cannot be wolfram
+2
level 68
Aug 17, 2016
@Louisea52 Wolfram and tungsten are the same thing, the symbol of this element is W after all. According to Wikipedia: "The word tungsten comes from the Swedish language tung sten, which directly translates to heavy stone. Its name in Swedish is volfram, however, in order to distinguish it from scheelite, which is alternatively named tungsten in Swedish." I have also never heard the name tungsten by the way, only wolfram.
+1
level 34
Dec 27, 2013
Messenger of the gods? I always thought it was Hermes...
+3
level 48
Jan 6, 2014
Mercury is the roman name while Hermes is the Greek. They are essentially the same with a few personality and job differences.
+2
level 46
Oct 4, 2015
Thank you Percy Jackson!
+1
level 49
Oct 4, 2015
SAME!!! Thanks pjo
+1
level 17
Nov 29, 2016
Same
+1
level 25
Apr 14, 2014
Hmm. I don't understand why Radium wasn't named after The Curie's (if they discovered it) but Curium (who I don't think had anything to do with the Curie's) was named after them :/
+2
level 38
May 29, 2014
A lot of the artificially created elements (after Plutonium) are named in honor of famous scientists. Whoever discovers/creates an element gets to choose a name, and many discoverers have chosen to honor those who came before them.
+1
level 10
Jun 9, 2014
As far as I'm aware, in the scientific community, it's considered very bad form to name something you've discovered (i.e. an element) after yourself. So most people name it after their country or in honour of another famous scientist.
+1
level 75
Oct 14, 2015
Never mind bad form, I don't think you're even allowed to name something after yourself. But I'm sure I read about some narcissistic guy who used his surname and said he was naming whatever it was after his brother.
+1
level 17
Nov 29, 2016
They named it Radium because of its radioactive glow and waves. Curium was named after a scientist whose idol was the Curies. I'm in sixth grade and I know all
+1
level 20
Apr 22, 2014
what is curie?
+1
level 44
Apr 25, 2014
Marie and Pierre Curie were Polish-born, French naturalized physicists made famous for their research into radioactive elements and the discoveries of Polonium and Radium. Their work led directly to the X-ray and radiation treatment for cancer.
+2
level 75
May 2, 2014
That is untrue : Pierre Curie was french, Marie Sklodowska was polish, they married and she became french.
+2
level 69
Oct 4, 2015
Similarly, their work did not lead to the discovery of x-rays, which had been observed for some decades before they began their work and which Roentgen investigated independent of the Curies.
+1
level 55
May 19, 2014
I don't see how most people would know iodine or tungsten unless they're chemistry/medicine nerds.
+2
level 44
Nov 15, 2014
I knew tungsten because that is what common light bulbs have as a filament. They are often called Tungsten Bulbs.
+1
level 50
Mar 5, 2018
I knew it, and I hate science
+2
level 58
Jul 9, 2015
All that GLISTERS is not gold.
+1
level 55
Oct 4, 2015
Thank you Susie - you beat me to the pedantry comment.
+1
level 72
Oct 4, 2015
And me; did Merchant Of Venice at school...
+1
level 59
Nov 16, 2018
Shakespeare's trying to contradict Stairway to Heaven.
+1
level 28
Nov 16, 2018
i thought this was failing at referencing smash mouth, but its actually shakespeare TIL
+1
level 49
Oct 4, 2015
Is it just me who thought that Marilyn Monroe's hair was golden or brassy blonde?
+1
level 71
Oct 8, 2015
Gold was already used and brass is an alloy. Platinum blonde is the accepted idiom.
+1
level 66
Dec 23, 2016
A US Penny is made of Brass ....... Copper + Zinc.
+1
level 68
Nov 16, 2018
Brass alloys consist of at least 50% copper. Ergo, a penny is NOT brass.
+1
level 59
Nov 16, 2018
Maybe you're thinking of a bad farthing.
+1
level 25
Dec 14, 2015
Iodine almost killed me there.
+1
level 48
Dec 23, 2016
I never saw the movie but I guessed Arsenic just in time.
+1
level 53
Feb 18, 2017
the melting point of carbon is 3500 celcius and tungsten is 3410
+1
level 75
Feb 21, 2017
Carbon is non-metallic, which is not what the question asked for.
+1
level 19
Jun 19, 2017
did anyone else try jingle bells for silver bells?
+1
level 66
Mar 5, 2018
If I discover an element I'll call it 'Jingle' ........ just for you.
+1
level 69
Nov 18, 2018
Jinglium?
+3
level 74
Mar 5, 2018
If you're really interested in element names, check out this version of the periodic table - it shows the origin of the names (person, country, mythology, &c) as well as the language of origin for the name: http://www.compoundchem.com/2016/06/09/element-names/ It's even free to use (for non-commercial purposes)!
+1
level 32
Nov 16, 2018
I didn't try it, but it should accept 'all that glisters' for 'glitters', given that that is the variant used in the Merchant of Venice and where it is usually accepted that the phrase originated.
+2
level 75
Nov 16, 2018
All you need to do is type 'gold'. No need to type 'glitters' or 'glisters'.