Mythical Lands

Name these famous places from mythology and fiction.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: March 1, 2017
First submittedAugust 1, 2012
Times taken53,138
Rating4.05
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Description
Place
Land from "The Lord of the Rings"
Middle Earth
Where hobbits live, specifically
The Shire
Sauron's realm
Mordor
Where Peter Pan lives
Neverland
Legendary Greek island that
sank into the ocean
Atlantis
Alice goes down a rabbit hole
and ends up here
Wonderland
Garden home of Adam and Eve
Garden of Eden
Where the Greek Gods lived
Olympus
Greek version of heaven
Elysian Fields
Island where King Arthur's
sword was forged
Avalon
Mythical "city of gold" sought
by the conquistadors
El Dorado
Description
Place
Land of the Norse gods
Asgard
Vast hall of the Norse gods,
located within ^
Valhalla
Land from "The Legend of Zelda"
Hyrule
Where Mario battles Bowser
Mushroom
Kingdom
Land of Aslan, the Great Lion
Narnia
Himalayan paradise invented by
British author James Hilton
Shangri-La
Land visited by Dorothy and Toto
Oz
Island of tiny people, visited by Gulliver
Lilliput
"Hunger Games" nation
Panem
Primary "Game of Thrones" continent
Westeros
Kingdom with an ideal society, as
imagined by Thomas More
Utopia
+1
Level 52
Sep 30, 2012
The city of gold was called "Cibola." "El Dorado" means "The Guilded One," as in one who is covered with gold, and refers to a person, not a place.
+3
Level ∞
Oct 2, 2012
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Dorado
+1
Level 52
Jan 15, 2013
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-20964114
+3
Level 42
Feb 15, 2013
Gilded = covered with gold, i.e., gilt. Guilded = ummm, in a guild, maybe? Just sayin'.
+5
Level 32
Oct 2, 2012
Garden of Eden wasn't under the category "fiction" -_-
+2
Level 50
Aug 9, 2014
No, it most certainly was not.
+2
Level 25
Sep 30, 2014
Actually, according to me, you're not right.
+2
Level 53
Mar 11, 2015
Yaaaay, pointless Internet shots fired, yaaaaaaay.
+2
Level 80
Apr 8, 2015
If you're objecting to pointless comments your response is... ?
+1
Level 46
Jul 2, 2018
Or lack thereof
+1
Level 67
Jun 12, 2019
No it was under mythical.. which seems correct to me. It is a centuries old handed down story which involves a believe (system) (and tries to explain certain aspects our existence).

And not a work purely written for entertainment purposes.

+1
Level 72
Oct 2, 2012
El Dorado was my first guess, but I know that conquistadors also searched for Cibola and Quivira. Missed all the places from games, forgot Panem, got all the others.
+1
Level 58
Oct 2, 2012
You can't be proven wrong or right that's the point.

"The central belief of every moron is that he is the victim of a mysterious conspiracy against his common rights and true deserts." - HL Mencken

+1
Level 59
Oct 2, 2012
Any one else try sovengard for the viking gods place?
+1
Level 48
Jan 25, 2013
I did. You must play Skyrim as well....
+3
Level 45
Oct 2, 2012
I wondered if people might take umbrage at the Eden question, and am mot surprised people did, but I think the Internet has spawned a rage industry, where people take offense about things and rant and stomp their feet that otherwise would not bother them, as they are inoffensive, and not intended to BE offensive. People should take it easy! I love jetpunk, but it is too inconsequential in the grand scheme for anyone to get that upset about this one quiz. If a person knows that someone was not intending any offense, and if the 'offense' is trivial in the extreme anyway, why waste the energy getting upset?
+2
Level 54
Oct 3, 2012
Oddly enough, I was expecting a comment like this to be posted within a day of this debate. I'd just like to say I'm not "upset" about the fact that the Garden of Eden was listed, nor about anything else pertaining to this quiz. I just believe it's civilly wrong to go right out and say (on a fully-public website, nonetheless) that Christianity is a hoax without any evidence to back up that claim. I wouldn't be concerned if the Garden of Eden fell under the "supposedly mythical" category, or if someone explained that it was fictional according to atheism; the problem here is that it's specifically called an unreal place. Overall, I'm not upset; I just have a strong viewpoint on this issue.
+2
Level 45
Oct 3, 2012
I didn't make the quiz, but I do not believe that considering the Garden of Eden to be mythical means one is repudiating ALL of Judeo-Christian theology (remember, the Garden of Eden is in the Old Testament, and therefore a part of Judaism and not just Christianity). I for instance know very religious people who do not look on all parts of the Bible with the same intensity (as do most, as very few Christians and Jews are OK with human slavery, which is everywhere in the Bible) and consider things, like the Tower of Babel for instance, go be sort of folklore. They try to find the spirit of the Bible, and not to take each part litterally.
+1
Level 36
Feb 10, 2015
You are suggesting a "prior restraint" all be it voluntary. That is unconstitutionmal in the U.S. Unless you can prove that extreme violence or damage to the country's safety will result, no one here ever must limit their speech before having to prove what they say is factual. The burden of proof would be on you, my dear, to prove they are wrong. You'd have to prove the Garden of Eden is real, not vice versa. That is the significance of the freedom of speech our forefathers gave to us! Other countries do not limit prior restraints. Don't suggest that an internet game be the first place to dissolve that freedom (with the exception of "clear and present danger" to the country and its people excepted by the Supreme Court for the last century). Can you imagine if you had to disprove evolution before you could argue creationism on your own website? What's sauce for the goose......
+1
Level 79
Apr 2, 2017
Actually, the Bible does claim to be the inspired word of God. (2 Timothy 3:16) And God allows us to believe that, or not.
+1
Level 54
May 18, 2017
@dunkinggandalf, your friends probably aren't really Christian, since 40% of Christians believe the earth was created by God in the past 10,000 years. Also, 'All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness' (2 Timothy 3:16). A clearer claim to inspiration from God you couldn't ask for.
+1
Level 54
May 18, 2017
@Don +1
+3
Level 80
Sep 20, 2017
gandalf tries to give you some credit.... you promptly smack it away.
+1
Level 75
Dec 19, 2018
Now be fair - Aesthus must be right because only he knows what a true ̶S̶c̶o̶t̶s̶m̶a̶n̶ Christian believes
+1
Level 67
Jun 13, 2019
The problem in this debate is that the original poster reads mythological as hoax. If the list was hoaxes, then yes I think it might be insensitive. Actively calling people out.

But a mythological place means a place many people have talked about over a long period of time and speaks to the imagination and often has lessons in it, and has or had a big following of believers in it, but noone really can prove whether it has or has not excisted. (as you mentioned earlier yourself somewhere; There is no proof for or against it)

+1
Level 46
Sep 20, 2017
Christians regard the Garden of Eden as real, not mythical, as this has atheistic inclinations. Not saying that there's an actual attack but religious people may take it that way.
+2
Level 73
Sep 20, 2017
Don, Descartes pointed out that a truly loving God would only give humans a capacity for reason which drew them closer to the truth. If you believe in a truly loving God, try applying your own capacity for reason to the concept of a talking snake.
+2
Level 45
Oct 3, 2012
@bebn: The people who I know who are religious might take offense at your way of looking at them. You are not the final arbiter of religion. They do not believe the Bible is the work of God, but of men, and therefore they find it imperfect, as man is imperfect. They are devoted Christians and Jews, but don't follow everything in the Bible, as I'm sure you don't. There are passages that speak of killing those who don't honor the Sabbath, and I have a feeling (or at least I HOPE) that you're not doing that. You have no right to say they're "calling God a liar," because they don't see it that way, and you have no authority on the matter save for how your religion affects your OWN life.
+1
Level 31
Oct 4, 2012
for greek heaven, can you accept 'fortunate isles' or 'isles of the blest'?
+1
Level 64
Feb 13, 2013
No offense was meant by the quiz. If you are offended, suck it up.
+2
Level 42
Feb 15, 2013
SUCK! IT! UP! ...... SUCK! IT! UP! ...... SUCK! IT! UP!
+1
Level 31
Feb 26, 2013
Basically, what every christian commenting here is doing, is stating that being religious gives you the right to demand that other people's beliefs are ERASED/Taken down, without considering anything else nor anyone else's opinion, but their own. AND its a known fact that the bible was written at the council of nicea, where CHRISTIANITY was INVENTED. So STFU and just enjoy the quiz, which is pretty good btw.

peace out

+3
Level 55
Sep 21, 2017
The Bible wasn't written at Nicaea. It was basically a meeting of the various early Christian community leaders to try and come up with some sort of consensus about the faith. Even in the early days, Christians couldn't agree with each other. The existence of many and varying sects of Christianity is a Christian tradition unto itself, haha. One thing the early church leaders wanted to do at Nicaea was choose which books should and should not be considered canon. The books were already all written before the meeting took place.
+1
Level 40
Mar 15, 2013
Elysian Fields is not correct. It is actually the Isles of the Blest. Elysian fields was good, but the Isles of the Blest could only be reached by being reborn 3 times and each time reaching the Elysian Fields.
+1
Level 25
Jan 26, 2016
But the Elysian fields were, if you will, the lower version of heaven that most people reached. Not the super place
+1
Level 75
May 26, 2017
So are you saying that for Christians to supposedly reach their heaven they have to first be reincarnated multiple times? Doesn't that go against a lot of what they believe?

hmm, original post March 2013, probably won't get a response to this...

+2
Level 57
Sep 20, 2017
Nah, he's saying in Greek mythology, heaven has a VIP room.
+1
Level 75
Sep 19, 2018
Yeah, what I said doesn't seem to have any bearing on that post... I'm wondering whether there was a post deleted or if I intended to reply to something else...
+1
Level 41
Jan 27, 2018
Ok someone's reading too much percy jackson
+1
Level 58
Apr 16, 2014
Is Hobbiton not also the place where hobbits live?
+1
Level 67
Nov 8, 2014
I believe that Hobbiton is a real life construction of the Shire as a tourist destination in Matamata, New Zealand.
+2
Level 49
Apr 8, 2015
Hobbiton is a villiage in the Shire, so technically a correct answer, but too specific for the quiz.It's also a tourist trap in New Zealand, but the mess Jackson made of the Hobbit burnt up all the goodwill I could have for such a place.
+1
Level 71
Aug 10, 2015
The Hobbiton site in Matamata is the actual filming site from all six of the LOTR/Hobbit movies. It wasn't created as a tourist destination. In fact, the contract that Peter Jackson signed w/the owner of the land (a sheep farmer) specified that after the LOTR movies were complete, the property was to be restored. Most of the set was bulldozed except for the hilly end, as it had rained heavily that year & the earth was too unstable for the dozer to go in. By the time the ground had dried out, a company called Red Carpet Tours had convinced the owner to let LOTR fans visit what remained of the set. It was restored to how it looked for the LOTR movies when the Hobbit movies were green lighted. I visited the Hobbiton set in 2006, before restoration for the Hobbit movies, w/Red Carpet Tours, & have a picture of my daughter (8 at the time & our own "hobbit" for the tour) looking out of the foyer window of Bag End.
+1
Level 25
Jan 26, 2016
Town, not region. I made the same mistake
+1
Level 4
Jan 14, 2015
garden of eden was a real place
+3
Level 70
Sep 20, 2017
Eden, NSW Australia, lovely spot, lots of gardens actually.
+1
Level 36
Feb 10, 2015
You know they found the hobbit floriensis woman on an island around Indonesia somewhere--so as it stands now, Middle Earth is the most proved of anything in this quiz. Hmmm?
+1
Level 58
Feb 10, 2015
Got them all except the video game ones and GoT.
+1
Level 45
Apr 8, 2015
The Garden of Eden can not be compared to Asgard or Valhalla. The Bible gives us the pre-flood location of Eden, whereas Asgard is just over the rainbow. The Bible tells exactly which rivers Eden flowed between prior to a worldwide flood. It mentions the Tigris, and Euphrates. Given the fact that the Bible is one of the most historically correct documents of its time (after the flood), I think it safe to say that even from an Atheistic perspective, the Garden of Eden was a factual place.
+2
Level 67
Apr 8, 2015
So if I write a book and include real places I can call it fact? Penthouse forums here I come. (pun somewhat intended)
+2
Level 80
Apr 8, 2015
So you've never seen a rainbow before? Also... what were those GPS coordinates in the Bible again?? Because I also heard that Eden was in Jackson County, Missouri. And Saudi Arabia. Plus, you think there was a worldwide flood and afterward we had all the same rivers as before?
+2
Level 54
May 18, 2017
Did you know that there's a city called Bethlehem in Pennsylvania? Did you even consider when writing your comment that maybe, just maybe, they could have named the new rivers after rivers which previously existed?
+2
Level 80
Sep 20, 2017
::face palm::
+3
Level 54
Sep 20, 2017
Well, you've fairly defeated me. How can I possibly come back to that argument?
+2
Level 83
Feb 19, 2019
Buddy... just stop...
+2
Level 52
Apr 8, 2015
By your logic then we should remove Olympus too, because that's an actual mountain in Greece. The tallest, in fact. Just because some ancient scribes wrote that Eden was a garden between the Euphrates and Tigris rivers doesn't mean it was actually there or ever actually existed. Paper doesn't refuse ink if it spells out lies. If you want Eden off this list then by all means, go and prove, beyond reasonable doubt via scientifically verifiable evidence, that Eden existed. Because that's how the burden of proof works. And before you say it, the Bible is a claim of events, not evidence for said events. Like testimony in a court of law, it means nothing if the evidence doesn't support it.

If nothing else, the story of the whole human race spawning from the incestuous relationship between a man and his morphed rib, has been proven false by genetics.

+3
Level 80
Apr 9, 2015
All human beings on Earth share a common descent from a single male ancestor and single female ancestor... this actually has been demonstrated through science. Those two ancestors just happened to live thousands of years apart. So.. even though they've been named Adam and Eve, probably not the same couple of hominids you may be thinking of...

Going back further than that, the most popular theory of abiogenesis is that it happened only once in Earth history (or happened many times but the other times it didn't take root in the same way), and that every living organism on the planet is descended from the same self-replicating organic molecule, billions of years ago. So, if that's right (there are competing theories), then... after that molecule self-replicated once by splitting off some of its own matter (let's call it a rib?).. then there would have been precisely two "living" things on Earth. Though not exactly human. And we would have descended from those two things.

+1
Level 59
Oct 5, 2018
@kalbahamut they did not live thousands of years apart. If you think about it you will realise why they could only have lived an absolute maximum of nine months apart.
+1
Level 75
Dec 3, 2018
What do you mean they couldn't have lived more than 9 months apart?

Look up mitochondrial Eve and Y-Chromosome Adam. There's no need for them to have been even vaguely contemporary. Or am I missing a joke?

+1
Level 59
Jan 8, 2019
@roleybob, I assume that you would be adding the condition that the Y-chromosome Adam has to be everyone's ancestor "on the male line" i.e. the father of the father of the father of etc. and a similar one for the "Eve"? My logic is simple. If everyone is descended from one woman they are also descended from her father. And if everyone is descended from one man they are also descended from his mother. Therefore, the last common male ancestor of everyone and the last common female ancestor of everyone cannot have lived more than nine months apart (this would happen if "Adam" died immediately after conceiving "Eve", and maybe a little bit longer should be added just in case the pregnancy took longer than average).
+1
Level 75
Jan 8, 2019
Yes - when we talk about most common ancestors it is usually in terms of unbroken matrilineal / patrilineal lines.

So your post is a nice thought but not right - for a start, if they are all descended from HER father then she breaks the male line herself, and also her mate would be a more recent male ancestor.

More pertinently, there's nothing to stop the male line bottlenecking before (or after) that generation without affecting the matrilineal line.

Obviously all of these things apply the other way around as well

+2
Level 75
Jan 8, 2019
An example of a different situation: say that the human race almost went extinct - there was only 1 woman alive (this isn't necessary when we talk about most recent ancestor - there may have been millions of other women alive at the time but all of those other lines became extinct at varying later generations, but in this example there is just the 1 woman left).

Fortunately, there were still 2 men left, and the 2 men were not closely related.

If the woman has multiple children by each man, then clearly there is more than 1 male ancestor (the 2 men) so we do not have our 'Adam', however all people (men and women) are now descendants of that 1 woman, so we do have 'Eve'.

In this scenario, the common ancestor is not restricted to considering matrilineal / patrilineal lines only

+1
Level 59
Jan 8, 2019
If you mean that then you are right that there is no reason to think that the two ancestors lived close together in time. It is also not so obvious that the two ancestors exist, although if you know about the existence of the Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA then your stronger claim becomes a necessity. However this would need to be stated explicitly as, for example, I would say that I share a close common ancestor with my half-uncle (his father and my maternal grandfather), and your definition would not count this.

In your other example, however, it still only works if you restrict it to matrilineal/patrilineal lines. If you are considering all ancestors as counting, then everyone is also a descendent of the woman's father, and you have your Adam.

+1
Level 75
Jan 8, 2019
Ha ha, yes I think I had a brain fart - the second example is supporting your point, not mine.

However, back to the first point - when we talk about Adam & Eve in the context of common ancestors, it is in reference to mitochondrial Eve and Y-Chromosomal Adam.

+1
Level 75
Jan 8, 2019
At least, that is what I believe to be true - I'm not an expert
+1
Level 67
Jun 13, 2019
Wow, this is the first "real time" conversation I have seen on here. A back and forth convo between two people with several comments on the same day.
+1
Level 80
Sep 28, 2019
TMW: mitochondrial DNA is not passed from father to daughter. Y-chromosomal DNA is not passed from mother to son. The common male ancestor all males on Earth got their Y-chromosomal DNA from is called Y-chromosomal-Adam. The common female ancestor all females on Earth got their mitochondrial DNA from is called Mitochondrial-Eve. These two people lived thousands of years apart. Apologies for not being more clear.
+4
Level 68
Nov 11, 2017
"The Bible tells exactly which rivers Eden flowed between prior to a worldwide flood. It mentions the Tigris, and Euphrates."

The Greek gods lived on Mt. Olympus. Mt. Olympus is an inarguably real place, therefore the Greek gods exist. Sherlock Holmes lived on Baker Street. Baker Street is a real street in London, therefore Sherlock Holmes was real. Spider-man lives in New York City, and New York City is definitely real, therefore Spider-man is an actual person.

"Did you even consider when writing your comment that maybe, just maybe, they could have named the new rivers after rivers which previously existed?"

Atlanta is named for the Greek titan Atlas, therefore there's really a giant holding the sky up on his shoulder. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday are all named for Norse gods, therefore the Norse gods are real. There's a city in Illinois called Metropolis, therefore Superman is real.

+1
Level 67
Jun 13, 2019
wait.. there is a city called metropolis?? Is there also a city called gotham? ( I know there is a city called batman :) )
+1
Level 46
Aug 3, 2020
I wouldn't be surprised if there was a city called gotham. It's not very far-fetched in terms of english topology.

Like metropolis. It's just... literally, a big city. Settlers don't always think much when founding a city !

+1
Level 68
Nov 20, 2020
There actually is a town (not city) called Gotham in England, though it's pronounced Got-am.
+1
Level 68
Oct 28, 2020
" the Bible is one of the most historically correct documents of its time". Hahahahahahaahahahahahahahahahhaahhahaah. Hahaahaha. Heheh. Heh. Sigh. Good one there.
+1
Level 62
Apr 8, 2015
Religion, shmeligion. I would just like to thank Tom Hiddleston for helping me get Asgard.
+1
Level 80
Apr 8, 2015
The only thing that doesn't belong here is Mt Olympus, which is a very real place. The Garden of Eden is certainly fictitious, and also a myth, and yes they're not precisely the same things but it is both. Olympus is neither.
+1
Level 80
Apr 8, 2015
Oh, I guess Kanto is also not mythological.
+3
Level 39
Apr 8, 2015
I knew that there would be angry people in the comments as soon as I saw the Garden of Eden!
+1
Level 19
Sep 21, 2017
Yup. Me too...
+2
Level 82
Apr 8, 2015
I have to apologise to most of the Americans here, but bebn123's attitude is one of the major things I dislike and fear about America. Not the first and not the last person to vocally feeling attacked the moment not everybody shares their personal belief. Yes. It's religion, it's a belief, not a science, not a truth. That's what religion is about FAITH. NOT PROOF. Don't confuse the two.

America, as far as I understand, has freedom of religion, so WHY should any American non-religious website show a positive bias towards Christianity? Demanding that it should be so, is totally pulling the rug from under freedom of religion.

+1
Level 54
Jul 9, 2020
Except that I didn't say anything about demanding religious-based bias? What I said back then was how it was a bad move to include a location mentioned in the Bible in a quiz about objectively mythical locations. Granted, I based that off the (incorrect) notion that "mythical" specifically meant fictional, but I've since addressed that, so now I take no issue with it. If anything, I was saying "Don't trivialize other religions," not "You should advocate for this religion specifically." Do you mind if I ask why you got the impression that I was insinuating said bias?
+1
Level 68
Oct 28, 2020
When you want others to conform to your belief that a fictional, yes fictional, place is real and consider that disagreeing, or even acknowedging that such a disagreement exists by its mere mention, is trivializing your belief, then yes, you are indeed demanding that they show the same bias. Your book has no more historical merit than Homer's lliad, and proof of that is overly abundant. Half of it was written 2 millennia ago, the other half is from the bronze age. People ignored a lot of things about the world back then, time to get an update.
+2
Level 12
Apr 9, 2015
If everyone is saying their opinion, can I admit to believing middle earth is real so also shouldn't be on this quiz : )
+1
Level 65
Sep 24, 2017
I live in Middle-Earth.
+4
Level 61
Apr 10, 2015
Wow,I thought it would be a prejudice that Americans are sooooo crazy with God and stuff. I hoped it is bad propaganda that most people in America believe in creationism and not in Darwin. I was wrong, as a lot of comments show and that scares me. Americans always believe that they are the crown of creation and the "best" and "strongest" nation in the world. But so many seem to believe that the whole mankind is based on 2 people - Adam and Eve, and thats so weird. Sorry, if I offend some of you, but for me - as a western-European - this is so crazy (and stupid - sorry again).
+2
Level 80
Apr 10, 2015
Some of the Creationists commenting here are from the UK and Australia, and I think there's another one from New Zealand. But thanks for stopping by and sharing your prejudice with us.
+2
Level 60
Dec 26, 2016
Creationists are a rare species in both the UK and Australia. Unlike the USA.
+2
Level 80
Sep 20, 2017
Bigots obviously are not a rare species outside the of the USA. They comment on this website every day. My response was relevant to the comment I was responding to.
+1
Level 59
Sep 6, 2018
Compared to most western nations, the USA has a very high proportion of Creationists. This is demonstrable fact. But I agree that what people write here doesn't supply any actual evidence.
+1
Level 61
Apr 10, 2015
Ok, its only 42 %, but its still very high:

And I do not wanted to offend somebody. Just sayin....

http://www.gallup.com/poll/170822/believe-creationist-view-human-origins.aspx

+2
Level 80
Apr 11, 2015
Did my comment really get removed? Was it the "t word?"

I'll say again. I'm American and I know that Evolution is a fact. So do near 200 million other people with the same address. Ken Ham is Australian. Ray Comfort is a kiwi. Harun Yahya is Turkish. Smartcookie, commenting above, is from the UK. There are crazy people in the Netherlands building replicas of Noah's Ark. So... when you come on here and automatically assume that every ignorant statement being made is coming from an American, and then imply that because you are European you are more enlightened and shielded from such stupidity, it kinda makes you seem like a jerk.

...just sayin'

+2
Level 61
Apr 13, 2015
Mmmhhh....most of the Darwin-denier are from USA, not from Netherlands, from New Zealand or Australia. There are no universities in one of these countries which teach creationism as a actual fact. And this is a FACT! So it was just logical to assume, that these comments are by Americans.

So you are one of the 58 % which believe in Evolution. Congrats!

+1
Level 80
Apr 13, 2015
This isn't an improvement.
+1
Level 45
Apr 10, 2015
Well, i have to say the comments were far more interesting to read than actual quiz. I would like to point that George Bush said, "i believe the jury is still out on that one." Merka!!!
+2
Level 80
Apr 11, 2015
Okay, and meanwhile:

David Cameron: "we should feel proud to say, ‘This is a Christian country.’"

Barack Obama: "Whatever we once were, we are no longer a Christian nation – at least, not just. We are also a Jewish nation, a Muslim nation, a Buddhist nation, and a Hindu nation, and a nation of nonbelievers."

God save the queen!!!

+1
Level 60
Dec 26, 2016
Straw man arguments. The particular problem in these comments is about Creationism, not Christianity.
+1
Level 54
Aug 22, 2017
Everyone knows the religion of a country is defined by its current, temporary, everyone-will-forget-about-them-in-a-century-or-two leader. Right?
+2
Level 80
Sep 20, 2017
coro: I'm sorry that you lack the mental capacity to understand my perfectly relevant comment.

Aesthus: now... *that's* a strawman argument. Though we could have an argument about the religion of the United States and you would lose... that's not what I was saying and you've missed the point.

+1
Level 59
Sep 6, 2018
Perhaps they were referring to what the countries actually are. There is nothing in the US constitution to set it up as a Christian nation, whereas England (but not the rest of the UK) has the Church of England as its official religion. However, the UK is much less religious than the USA. Most British adults don't even believe in God (according to some surveys).
+2
Level 24
May 21, 2015
Land of the norse gods - Vanaheim! As there were two different groups, why should we leave out the other because they were more peaceful and had a smaller part in sagas?
+1
Level 57
Sep 20, 2017
no love for the vanir
+2
Level 58
Jul 31, 2015
Second time around. Got GOT. I nearly created a new sitcom by misspelling the mythical land of gold as Ed Lorado, whom I think of as an incompetent Sam Spade, possibly played by Andy Richter.
+2
Level 71
Aug 10, 2015
Larry, you made me truly LOL!
+1
Level 59
Jun 29, 2016
No Eternia?
+1
Level 58
Sep 15, 2016
It's true. I can tell your not Christian.
+1
Level 72
Sep 29, 2016
Wonderland is a themepark in Canada and Oz is a large country in the Southern Hemisphere. Just saying...
+1
Level 65
Sep 24, 2017
LOL
+1
Level 48
Jan 10, 2017
100% with 3:51 remaining. Great quiz. xx

- Mo

+1
Level 71
Mar 1, 2017
I would like to thank the Marvel movies for my knowledge of Asgard.
+1
Level 74
Mar 1, 2017
Beautiful quiz
+1
Level 67
Mar 12, 2017
I loved the first comment, "I demand", lol. Most people in the world don't believe in Christianity. So the majority would agree that Eden is a myth.
+1
Level 54
May 18, 2017
There are 2.2 billion Christians and 1.8 billion Muslims in the world. 4 billion is more than half of 7.3 billion. So the majority would agree that Eden is a real place, since both of these are Abrahamic religions.
+2
Level 75
May 26, 2017
Maybe you are right and those 4 billion people do believe in the Biblical garden of Eden. If so then that majority would be wrong.

The majority used to believe that the Solar system is geocentric. They were wrong.

+1
Level 54
Aug 22, 2017
The majority is not always wrong. The majority now think the earth is round. They are right. The point is that the majority of people do not believe that Eden is a myth, which was what @noodles seemed to be saying.
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Level 63
Aug 25, 2017
The majority of people do not run this website, so their opinion is meaningless. Anyone's opinion about a fact is meaningless - it doesn't change the fact.
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Level 54
Sep 5, 2017
There are very few things, outside of religion and opinion, that more than half of earth's population believe that are false. And your original comment was talking about how the majority's opinion should be used, so...yeah, I think the word hypocritical would be appropriate under the circumstances.
+1
Level 80
Sep 20, 2017
"There are very few things, outside of religion and opinion, that more than half of earth's population believe that are false." ...so you admit religion is false?
+1
Level 54
Sep 20, 2017
Really, kal? I mean that no religion is proven, and if you weren't trying to read idiocy into my words, you wouldn't see that. But returning to the point, no religion is believed by a majority of the world, so it's impossible for any one religion to be both true and believed by a majority of earth's population.
+2
Level 75
Feb 16, 2018
Regardless, argumentum ad populum is a logical fallacy
+2
Level 67
Jun 13, 2019
Not every christian believes the bible is true word for word. Many believe atleast part of it is more abstract, allegories. I would be surprised it nowayawdays it would be more than half that believe it word for word. (Even if you disregard the fact that many might label themselves christian, because they were brought up that way, actively practising it is something else. Many have not seen the inside of a church for years, or just go out of habit or community feeling)
+2
Level 53
Sep 20, 2017
I love the audacity that the ancient Greeks had in naming Olympus as the dwelling place of the gods. As a real place, they were just daring people to not even try to go up there. "Mommy, where does Zeus live?" "Oh, honey, he lives over there. Do NOT go over there. Sweet dreams."
+4
Level 54
Sep 20, 2017
Yikes... the cringe-worthy things you see about yourself five years later.

Look. I understand (now, anyway) mythological is not the same as fictional, so yeah, I admit I majorly jumped the gun assuming this quiz was implying "Christianity is a hoax." And yes, I also admit that back then I was way more close-minded and defensive about the issue than I am now, and my response to Hdny42 was overall unnecessary and may have come off as kind of ignorant or just kind of dumb.

But holy crap, people. Nowhere in there did I say anything about denying Christianity guaranteeing you a one-way trip to Hell, or if you don't 100% agree with my religious beliefs, you're not really Christian. If your religious beliefs vary? That's fine. If you disagree with me that calling the Garden of Eden completely fictional is objectionable (even though I already said I realize that's not what this quiz is doing)? That's fine. But nothing in my comment is worth getting all up in arms about. Calm. Down.

+2
Level 80
Sep 20, 2017
It took several years for me to admit I was wrong about my faith-based ideas as well and looking back at some of the things I wrote then it sometimes seems as though they were written by a different person. Be glad that you are capable of feeling that cringe. It's not something to be embarrassed about it means you are capable of self-reflection.
+3
Level 54
Sep 20, 2017
You hit the nail on the head there. Even in regards to topics outside of religion, I used to be pretty close-minded as a kid, and had a really tough time understanding how other people could possibly believe opinion X or view Y. Thankfully, time and experience eventually helped me break out of that mindset, so I'm so glad I actually have a reasonable amount of common sense and critical thinking ability now to keep me levelheaded.
+2
Level 79
Sep 20, 2017
All of us react when we feel our core beliefs are being challenged. As we acquire wisdom, hopefully we begin to realize we cannot change what others do or think, we can only change how we respond to them. I applaud your willingness to share your wiser self with us today.
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Level 65
Sep 24, 2017
Finally some sensible comments!
+1
Level 67
Sep 20, 2017
All this religious commentary aside, Mount Olympus is an actual, factual place, so I question its inclusion here. There are those who may argue the residents were mythological, but as the quiz is about the land or location, it should be removed. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Olympus
+1
Level 56
Sep 20, 2017
You forgot to add Palestine to this list.
+3
Level 80
Sep 20, 2017
So... a few nights ago I was walking in to Mordor...
+1
Level 21
Sep 26, 2017
Can you accept "Panam" for Panem? I was going crazy cause I knew the name of where Hunger Games took place, but it never occurred to me that the spelling is wrong.
+2
Level 80
Oct 3, 2017
PanAm is a defunct American airline, not a mythical land.
+1
Level 65
Nov 28, 2018
Really? 150 comments and nobody has noticed that an utopia is a perfect society, not any imaginary land.
+1
Level 75
Dec 3, 2018
Utopia is the name of a fictional island in the book of the same name by Thomas More
+1
Level 67
Jun 13, 2019
Ehm the book roleybob is referring to is actually the Source of the word... Moore is the one that made that word up.. So if it wasnt for him that word wouldnt even exist.
+1
Level 67
Jun 12, 2019
Anyone else immediately got the zelda soundtrack in their head ? The harder I tried to think of the name, the more intense the song was going in my head haha Didnt manage to get it :/

others I missed are mushroom, westeros and panem. Never seen anything of hunger games or game of thrones. Panem means zero to me (well, it makes me think of bread...) but I have heard of westeros.

+1
Level 64
Feb 1, 2020
I think Atlantis was not Greek. It was the fictional enemy of Athens from some place in the Atlantic ocean.
+2
Level 80
Feb 29, 2020
Thank you for accepting "Ass Guard" for Asgard.
+2
Level 54
May 4, 2020
'mythology', as in, referencing a series of beliefs held by a group of people. If the people that believe in the bible are arguing that 'eden' shouldn't be there because it isnt a 'mythological' place, then we have an issue. I know there are video games and movie things here. Those, perhaps, shouldn't be considered 'mythological' but rather 'fantasy'. So in that way, it's a poorly worded title. However 'Valhalla', 'Olympus' and 'Eden' all belong in the same category... unless you don't think Eden is part of the christian mythology? If anything, Olympus would be the one that shouldn't be there because it exists on a map.
+1
Level 44
Aug 3, 2020
Dammit - I was surprised at getting all of them and then questions on the Hunger Games and Game of Thrones. I should obviously read more bookes with "game" in the title :-S
+1
Level 55
Nov 4, 2020
The Garden of Eden is not a mythical land! The Bible is non-fiction, and if you don't believe me, go read it and you will see!