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Names for Crimes Quiz

Name the crimes described below.
All answers are a single word
Last updated: November 14, 2018
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Description
Crime
Illegal fire-starting
Arson
Intentional homicide
Murder
Mugging, for example
Robbery
Holding a person against their will
Kidnapping
Defamation in print
Libel
Sneaking in and stealing something
Burglary
Spoken defamation
Slander
Lying in court
Perjury
Blackmail
Extortion
Having two spouses
Bigamy
Hanging around too long
Loitering
Description
Crime
Illegal importation
Smuggling
Illegal hunting
Poaching
Shopping for a prostitute
Solicitation
Stealing from your employer, for example
Embezzlement
Being where you're not supposed to
Trespass
Illegal deception for personal gain
Fraud
Illegal payments in exchange for influence
Bribery
The act of betraying one's country
Treason
Physical assault
Battery
Defacing property
Vandalism
Meeting to arrange a future crime
Conspiracy
+1
level 81
Feb 23, 2013
Mugging - why not accept theft?
+1
level 71
May 21, 2014
Because mugging is specifically taking something from a person, while theft is a very broad term for simply taking something that doesn't belong to you.
+1
level ∞
Nov 9, 2014
Theft will work now
+1
level 75
Jun 1, 2017
Agree. All muggings and robberies are thefts, but not all thefts are muggings or robberies. If theft is accepted for mugging, then it should also be accepted for burglary and embezzlement.
+1
level 36
Jun 3, 2017
Technically, robbery is the taking from another person. Higher penalties than simple theft because of the increased chance someone could be hurt. Same theory as with burglary which (at common law) was stealing from a residence--increased chance someone might be there--and at common law required the crime to occur at night. Then, there were serious penalties. They've weakened the law by statute, expanding it to any building and any time of day and weakening penalties. BTW, conspiracy just requires a meeting of the minds, not a physical meeting. And kidnapping requires moving the person held even a tiny distance, though statutes define it today. "False imprisonment" is the crime for simply holding a person against their will.
+1
level 33
Feb 23, 2013
Great quiz!
+1
level 58
Feb 23, 2013
Somehow, I got "burglary" last. I typed in "robbery" and "theft" about six times each before I took a breath and thought it through.
+1
level 49
Feb 23, 2013
couldn't bigamy-having 2 spouses also be known as cheating on someone? just a suggestion.
+1
level 59
Nov 23, 2018
Cheating and adultery aren't crimes in most countries.
+1
level 5
Feb 23, 2013
soliciting is the selling not shoping, grat quizz thogh,100% in not for spelling
+1
level 58
Jul 11, 2017
I kept trying 'procuring' and it never worked. Never *did* get soliciting... the only one I missed.
+1
level 38
Feb 23, 2013
polygamy is also having two wives... kill is also murder could you add these because there also crimes: forgery harassment rape shoplifting stalking
+1
level 73
Feb 27, 2013
poly = many. Bi = two. Kill is not the name of the crime...unless you are a big fan of Demolition Man, but even then, it's Murder Death Kill. So come on...
+1
level 65
Apr 22, 2015
Polygamy is defined as "the practice of having more than one spouse" So it fits, just because Bi means two doesn't mean that this answer is incorrect. Polygamy, by definition, is also a correct answer to this clue.
+1
level 35
Aug 2, 2013
There really should be more acceptable answers. Theft and breaking and entering would be handy.
+1
level 77
Dec 4, 2014
"Breaking and entering" is 3 words.
+1
level 76
Mar 26, 2014
I couldn't get the Hamburgler out of my head for some reason.
+1
level 69
Jun 24, 2014
I tried premeditated murder, capital murder, 1st degree murder, but missed it because I never tried just "Murder". 2nd degree murder is not necessarily intentional. Often it is in the heat of the moment and the person does not really intend to kill anyone. So, intentional homicide can't just be called murder. 2nd degree can be Unintentional. Good quiz.
+1
level 58
Apr 22, 2015
Definition: Second-degree murder is ordinarily defined as: an intentional killing that is not premeditated or planned, nor committed in a reasonable "heat of passion". Thus making it "intentional homicide". I believe unintentional homicide is called manslaughter, making it a different crime than murder, and murder being perfectly acceptable as an all encompassing answer.
+1
level 45
Apr 22, 2015
Could you maybe accept a few alternate spellings for "perjury"?
+1
level 69
Apr 22, 2015
Penalty for bigamy = complete second set of in-laws
+1
level 7
Apr 22, 2015
Great test all were accurate
+1
level 57
Apr 22, 2015
different. good, thanks. picky but pls accept "kidnap" without the -ing like you do for "trepass"
+1
level 49
Apr 22, 2015
Solicitation is a crime? Really?
+1
level 76
Apr 22, 2015
Depends on what country, state or county you are in.
+1
level 62
Jun 1, 2017
Yeah, I almost missed that one thinking "I don't know - that's not illegal here". Nor should it be anywhere, but that's just my opinion. :)
+1
level 73
Apr 22, 2015
In the UK Slander & Libel are civil wrongs ,ie. 'torts', not criminal offences. Is it different in the US?
+1
level 57
Apr 22, 2015
Can you accept "Kidnap"
+2
level 61
Apr 22, 2015
Could you also accept 'larceny' for theft?
+1
level 59
Apr 22, 2015
I feel like blackmail could also be "coercion".
+1
level 69
Apr 23, 2015
I thought payola should be accepted for bribery, but I understand that it's not precisely the same.
+1
level 51
Oct 5, 2015
10th grade business law helped!
+1
level 67
Oct 12, 2016
To those asking for kidnap to be accepted - the offence is defined (in all legal codes of which I am aware, and certainly in the UK and the US) as 'kidnapping'. The word 'kidnap' is occasionally used in legal journals, and even government documents, to refer to the laws concerning abduction generally, but the statutes and common law offences (and therefore the indictment) always refer to 'kidnapping'. To ask for 'kidnap' to be accepted is like asking for 'Solicit' or 'Burgle' (or, conversely 'Murdering') So, the Quizmaster is entirely correct in refusing to allow kidnap. I agree with kdc4 - robbery and mugging require force or its threat whereas theft does not. Therefore theft should NOT be accepted. @BazMcHat - unless it has changed since I left UK law school 30 years ago, libel IS a criminal offence in the UK (whereas slander is not). Both are torts (as indeed are most crimes). Despite all the above, I only got 4 as I couldn't think of Poaching.
+1
level 25
Oct 24, 2016
Love the quiz! Can you add more, please? :D
+1
level 70
Apr 2, 2017
Nice quiz. Felt like I was at one of my family reunions.
+1
level 60
May 28, 2017
I missed 50% of these. I only got correct those that I have committed.
+1
level 14
Jun 1, 2017
Robbery and burglary are technically the same thing
+1
level 67
Jun 1, 2017
Not in the UK at least. Robbery is theft with violence whereas burglary is theft with trespass.
+1
level 75
Jun 1, 2017
They aren't in the US, either. However definitions differ from state to state. For example, in Missouri, a charge of First Degree Burglary requires that someone who is armed, unlawfully enters or remains in a structure where another person is present who is not involved in the burglary. Second Degree Burglary is simply unlawfully entering a building with the intent to commit a crime. Second Degree Robbery is forcibly taking property and causing physical injury, while First Degree Robbery is forcibly stealing property while either seriously injuring another, having a deadly weapon, displaying a real or fake weapon, threatening another with a weapon, or stealing controlled substances from a pharmacy. Unless QM wanted to list all the definitions from each state and country, he did fine with the quiz the way it is.
+1
level 44
Jun 1, 2017
Wouldn't holding someone against their will be false imprisonment? Isn't kidnapping moving someone against their will?
+1
level 57
Jun 1, 2017
Couldn't theft suffice for "Sneaking in and stealing something"? I got 20. Not sure what to think about that!
+1
level 52
Jun 1, 2017
Trespass isn't a crime in the United Kingdom. Maybe specify that this is for US crimes?
+2
level 58
Jun 1, 2017
It can be. Mostly it's a tort and therefore a civil issue, but criminal trespass exists in the UK - Criminal Justice and Public Order Act, 1994.
+1
level 37
Jun 1, 2017
what about abduction for kidnapping
+1
level 48
Jun 1, 2017
For sneaking in and stealing something, could you accept breaking and entering as a possible answer?
+1
level 51
Jun 1, 2017
Blackmail and extortion are two different things. Doesn't make sense to use blackmail as a description for extortion or vice versa.
+1
level 31
Jun 1, 2017
For fraud, I was thinking identity theft, but I forgot it can only be 1 word.
+1
level 43
Sep 22, 2017
Embezzlement seemed a little vague from the clue
+1
level 59
Nov 23, 2018
Agreed. Embezzlement is a financial crime. Not all stealing from your employer is embezzlement. You can't embezzle pens from your office.
+1
level 70
Feb 25, 2019
try stopping me