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The 19th Century Quiz

Can you name these notable people, places, and things from the 19th century?
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: November 4, 2018
First submittedMarch 29, 2014
Times taken19,898
Rating4.40
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Year
Description
Answer
1837-1901
This queen rules the British empire for most of the century
Queen Victoria
1889
This tower becomes the world's tallest manmade structure
Eiffel Tower
1877
This inventor patents the phonograph
Thomas Edison
1873
Levi Strauss invents this type of clothing
Blue Jeans
1869
This canal is finished in Egypt
Suez Canal
1865
This political leader is assassinated at Ford's Theater
Abraham Lincoln
1865
Edward Whymper leads the first party to climb this Swiss peak
Matterhorn
1844
"What hath God wrought" is the first message sent using this new technology
Telegraphy
1839-1860
China fights two wars with western powers over this drug
Opium
1836
This short-lived republic declares independence from Mexico
Texas
1831
This naturalist begins his famous journey on the HMS Beagle
Charles Darwin
1825
This canal connects the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean
Erie Canal
1816-1828
This warrior-king unites many Zulu tribes
Shaka Zulu
1824
This composer completes his ninth and final symphony
Ludwig van
Beethoven
1824
This Romantic poet dies while fighting for Greek independence
Lord Byron
1819
This "liberator" becomes the first President of Gran Colombia
Simón Bolívar
1818
Mary Shelley writes this horror novel
Frankenstein
1815
Napoleon meets his final defeat at this battle
Battle of Waterloo
1804
This country becomes independent following a slave revolt
Haiti
1803
The United States buys this territory from France
Louisiana
+2
level 77
May 13, 2014
easy breezy lemon squeezy.
+1
level 49
May 13, 2014
Agreed.
+4
level 76
Feb 10, 2017
Once again, it's "Easy peasy lemon squeezy." Easy breezy beautiful is the Cover Girl slogan. However, I kind of like your combined version.
+1
level 77
Feb 10, 2017
breezy to me seems like a better synonym for easy than "peasy," which I don't believe is even a real word. But "breezy" makes sense... when I think of breezy... I think of... relaxed, easy-going, something that passes quickly and easily and without a lot of force or disturbance. Not a strong wind just a gentle breeze. Or sitting on a beach with palm trees swaying. I'm going to stick with easy breezy
+2
level 73
Mar 19, 2018
Thinking it sounds better doesn't make you right, though. But I know how you like to be right, so let's just let that one pass. :)
+1
level 77
Aug 21, 2018
How can one be right or wrong about the words they choose to use in a sentence if those words aren't even meant to make much sense but only rhyme? (and the word proposed as a replacement isn't even a word) I didn't say that my way was the one that everyone else used, nor do I especially care if it is.
+2
level 74
Dec 16, 2018
This is getting sleazy real easy.
+1
level 82
May 13, 2014
Modern Prometheus should also count for Mary Shelley's novel.
+1
level 73
May 13, 2014
Seriously?
+1
level 55
Jun 1, 2014
Showoff.
+2
level 73
Sep 2, 2014
Yep...that's all it is.
+1
level 67
Feb 10, 2017
Drayen wins my golden nitpickers award for this quiz.
+1
level 57
Feb 10, 2017
Prometheus, a Titan in Greek mythology who stole fire from the gods and gave it to mankind, parallels Victor Frankenstein, who "stole" the secret to creating life from nature. Coincidentally, Mary Shelley's husband soon after published Prometheus Unbound
+1
level 45
May 13, 2014
Ah, I wrote Materhorn. D*&1!
+1
level 66
May 13, 2014
How did I miss Erie Canal? I must still be sleeping. :*(
+1
level 68
May 13, 2014
This was easy. 3:48 left.
+1
level 45
May 13, 2014
only missed lord byron. Darn.
+1
level 39
May 16, 2014
20 OUT OF IN 1:11
+1
level 55
Aug 25, 2015
Nothing about the revolutions in 1848?!
+1
level 79
Jul 4, 2018
Probably hard to write a good clue with a simple, short answer for that one.
+1
level 73
May 2, 2016
Surely telegram should be accepted
+1
level ∞
Aug 25, 2016
Okay
+1
level 73
Sep 15, 2016
I'm not sure Levi Strauss invented blue jeans. He established the first factory making riveted blue jeans, but serge dyed with indigo was invented in De Nimes (hence 'denim'), and it was turned into denim trousers in Genoa (hence 'jean').
+1
level 73
Mar 19, 2018
If you're gonna correct a clue, at least do it right: Nîmes doesn't need "de" before its name. (I'm sorry, I must be moody tonight. Been nitpicking the nitpickers...)
+1
level 52
Oct 28, 2018
de means of or from (depending on context) e.g. Jeanne d'Arc.... Joan of Arc, or literally Joan from Arc
+1
level 74
Dec 16, 2018
Exactly. That's why he's right. It's not in Of Nimes, it is in Nimes.
+1
level 38
Oct 7, 2019
Without the "De" before "Nimes", you wouldn't get Denim.
+1
level 72
Sep 17, 2016
This quiz struck me as too easy to be competitive.
+1
level 46
Feb 12, 2017
I feel like telegraph should could for telegraphy, but maybe that's because I didn't know that telegraphy was a word...
+1
level 40
Mar 7, 2017
'Frankenstein' is actually the more common name for the true title of Mary Shelley's novel, 'The Modern Prometheus'. At the very least, add this as a type-in.
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