Animals that Start with S

Name these animals that start with the letter S.
This quiz is not based on scientific taxonomy!
Quiz by Quizmaster
Rate:
Last updated: September 21, 2018
First submittedOctober 10, 2012
Times taken47,616
Rating4.39
5:00
Enter animal here:
0
 / 24 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Clue
Animal
What the ugly duckling was
Swan
Baby-delivering bird
Stork
Largest type of freshwater fish;
its eggs are sold as caviar
Sturgeon
Slithering reptile
Snake
Nut-hiding rodent
Squirrel
Male deer
Stag
Prawn
Shrimp
Eight-legged insect eater
Spider
What shepherds herd
Sheep
Female pig
Sow
Arachnid with two claws and a
venomous tail stinger
Scorpion
Pepé Le Pew was one
Skunk
Clue
Animal
Relative of octopuses and cuttlefish
Squid
Animal that killed the Crocodile Hunter
Stingray
Antelope namesake of South African rugby
Springbok
Varieties include mako, nurse and hammerhead
Shark
"Lazy" animal of Central and South America
Sloth
Subtypes include sea lions and walruses
Seal
Speedy fish with a very sharp bill
Swordfish
Slimy, slow-moving, shelled mollusk
Snail
The above without a shell
Slug
Small fish species where
males get "pregnant"
Seahorse
Amphibian with a lizard-like appearance
Salamander
Popular food fish with pink flesh
Salmon
+2
Level 3
Nov 19, 2012
a baby delivering bird is stalk and technically caviar is any fish's eggs
+7
Level 50
Jul 29, 2018
It doesn’t matter how you pronounce the word though, the bird is called a stork.
+1
Level 37
Jun 23, 2019
Quizz creator wasn't asking about the eggs, but the name of the fish that spawned the eggs known as caviar.
+1
Level 65
Nov 12, 2020
Hey, you don't get to the lofty heights of level 3 by being a slouch.
+5
Level 59
Apr 3, 2013
"Speedy fish with a very sharp bill" could also include "sailfish." And kcd317, all fish eggs are roe, but only sturgeon and paddlefish (Family Acipenseriformes) eggs are caviar.
+1
Level 88
May 14, 2013
That is true according to the UN's food and agriculture branch, but roe from steelhead, salmon, trout, and whitefish is often labeled as caviar as well.
+1
Level 71
Jun 22, 2013
Yeah I bought some of those at a Russian deli. The dye ran off when I took it out of the jar: I got what I paid for.
+1
Level 55
Jun 22, 2013
Octopuses? Seriously? Need I point out the error here?
+10
Level 67
Feb 15, 2019
There is no error here. The plural of Octopus (in English) is Octopuses. If you want a non-English response, yes, it's Octopedes - because it comes from Greek. But, I bet you're one of those hypercorrectors who say Octopi as though the word comes from Latin. Either way, you're wrong and the Quizmaster is correct.
+1
Level 68
Feb 15, 2019
The plural of 'octopus' is 'octopuses'
+2
Level 64
Feb 15, 2019
The pluralisation that would be consistent with the words Greek roots would be Octopodes, not Octopedes.
+2
Level 80
Feb 15, 2019
The Oxford English Dictionary lists "octopi" as an acceptable plural.
+1
Level 65
Nov 12, 2020
The Oxford English Dictionary lists octopuses, octopi, and octopodes (the order reflecting decreasing frequency of use), stating that the last form is rare. The online Oxford dictionary states that the standard plural is octopuses, that octopodes is still occasionally used, and that octopi is incorrect.
+2
Level 37
Jun 23, 2019
All are acceptable.
+3
Level 40
Jun 22, 2013
So that's where babies come from. I've often wondered.
+3
Level 78
Mar 2, 2017
I was told I was found under a cabbage leaf in the garden. Is that where the stork leaves babies?
+2
Level 67
Feb 15, 2019
Only the naughty ones who don't eat their veges.
+2
Level 24
Jul 4, 2013
Lots of aquatic creatures, I noticed.
+1
Level 67
Jan 18, 2021
Yes at one point I needed 2 more and was somehow convinced it needed to be marine/aquatic however you say it animals. I tried seasnail and seaslug....
+2
Level 64
Jan 31, 2014
Sailfish and spearfish should both be accepted for "speedy fish with a very sharp bill."
+1
Level 27
Apr 6, 2014
3 minutes left, couldn't find Springbok
+3
Level 84
Aug 6, 2014
'Sailfish' should also be an acceptable answer as well as 'Swordfish'. Sailfish can travel at over 100km/h
+1
Level 78
Sep 1, 2014
One more vote for sailfish. It's the only one I thought of.
+2
Level 86
Sep 11, 2014
I tried "skink" for the amphibian one. After looking it up, I realized I was wrong. It's an actual lizard. *sigh*
+2
Level 42
Dec 7, 2015
The Ugly Duckling was a baby swan (hence the "ling", known as a cygnet or swanling.
+2
Level 72
Dec 7, 2015
He had to grow up to realize he was beautiful. So swan is correct rather than cygnet or "swanling"
+1
Level 30
Dec 7, 2015
A stag is NOT a male deer!
+5
Level 44
Dec 7, 2015
What is a stag then? Because it is customary for some large male deer to be called a stag......most people do know the term buck, but stag is also another term for an older, larger male deer.
+1
Level 42
Feb 15, 2019
Yes it is duh
+1
Level 37
Jun 23, 2019
Maybe you are thinking 'stag night' -that's not a male deer, that's a gathering that resembles and sounds like the stag that is the male deer.
+1
Level 62
Apr 27, 2020
That smells like the male deer, you mean.
+4
Level 71
Jan 2, 2016
Did you think they were horses
+1
Level 71
Jan 18, 2016
Read the clue "small fish species where males get 'pregnant'" and knew exactly which fish it was (I was picturing it) but could not think of the word "seahorse"
+1
Level 49
Nov 17, 2016
Could not think of stag, actually came up with Sika deer which I have no idea what that is but it was floating around in my head lol
+1
Level 80
Jul 29, 2018
Sika is a species of deer native to eastern Asia, also known as Japanese deer or spotted deer. They were introduced, and have become well established, in many other places around the world, including several east coast and mid-western states of the US.
+1
Level 72
Dec 18, 2016
Shrimp and prawn are not the same thing.
+3
Level ∞
Jun 7, 2018
From Wikipedia: The terms shrimp and prawn themselves lack scientific standing. Over the years, the way shrimp and prawn are used has changed, and nowadays the terms are almost interchangeable.
+1
Level 31
Oct 24, 2017
So, really, 6% don't know that shepherds are literally that, sheep herders ??? sheesh !!!
+1
Level 67
Jan 18, 2021
Or english isn't their mother tongue. If you only know the basics of English, sheepherding isn't a subject that tends to come up often.
+1
Level 67
Jan 18, 2021
Sometimes it seems/feels like at least 50% or people don't realise that other countries and language exist in the world. (And that people from other places like quizzes too.)
+2
Level 65
Jan 15, 2018
Never heard of Pepe Le Pew. Should have guessed though.
+1
Level 37
Jun 23, 2019
He was the skunk who tried to woo that female skunk - with his romantic french accent.
+1
Level 77
Nov 18, 2019
Penelope Pussycat was a cat, not a skunk.
+2
Level 78
Jan 21, 2018
I thought salmon have salmon-colored flesh. :)
+2
Level 81
Jun 3, 2018
Anyone who hasn't seen a video of a male seahorse ejecting it's babies into the water should look it up. It's pretty wild.
+2
Level 55
Jan 10, 2019
Female pig can also be a swine
+1
Level 37
Jun 23, 2019
swine is a collective term.
+1
Level 65
Nov 12, 2020
No it isn't. It is a synonym for pig.
+2
Level 68
Jan 14, 2021
But "swine" doesn't specifically mean female pig.
+1
Level 70
Feb 15, 2019
I need defintely need a rest! I didn't get the stork because when I read the description I thought of a bird who gives birth to its babies (instead of laying eggs).
+1
Level 37
Jun 23, 2019
and that bird would be?
+1
Level 62
Apr 27, 2020
A splatypus
+2
Level 48
Feb 16, 2019
Sea lions and walruses are NOT subtypes of seal. They are relatives, but definitely not seals themselves.
+1
Level 68
Jan 14, 2021
Well... yes and no. Seals can mean any type of pinniped, which covers three families: walruses, eared seals (sea lions and fur seals) and earless seals (also known as true seals.) You can limit the term "seals" to mean just the earless seals, but that would cut off a bunch of species of fur seals that are also commonly called "seals." And including fur seals but not sea lions doesn't make much sense, because they're much more closely related to each other than either are to earless seals.
+1
Level 45
Oct 8, 2019
Got Springbok
+1
Level 38
Oct 14, 2020
snakes don't slither
+1
Level 68
Jan 14, 2021
...yes they do? "Slither" is defined by Cambridge as "to move easily and quickly across a surface while twisting or curving." Merriam-Webster specifically defines it as "to slip or slide like a snake."