Geography by Letter - G

Guess these geographical answers that start with the letter G.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: September 5, 2018
First submittedApril 26, 2013
Times taken59,640
Rating4.19
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Hint
Answer
Elvis's residence
Graceland
World's biggest island
Greenland
Hungarian meat stew
Goulash
Hinduism's holiest river
Ganges
Biggest city in Scotland
Glasgow
Deutschland
Germany
"Cowboy" of Patagonia
Gaucho
Small U.S. territory in the Pacific
Guam
Chinese desert
Gobi
Egyptian pyramid locale
Giza
Pennsylvania site of a 1863
Civil War battle
Gettysburg
Hint
Answer
Sweden's second biggest city
Gothenburg
Mexico's second biggest metro area
Guadalajara
Sea inlet similar to a bay
Gulf
South American country
Guyana
California's most famous bridge
Golden Gate Bridge
Ecuadorian island chain visited by Darwin
Galapagos
Huron, Superior, Michigan, etc...
Great Lakes
U.S. state or Caucasian country
Georgia
Strait separating Spain and Morocco
Gibraltar
Spanish tomato soup, served cold
Gazpacho
Italian name equivalent to John
Giovanni
+9
Level 88
May 31, 2013
Read it as "Chinese dessert" several times, and was going to call foul.
+1
Level 68
Aug 21, 2013
ditto
+2
Level 54
Nov 7, 2013
I know several Chinese entrees that contain fowl, but no Chinese desserts. lol
+3
Level 39
Apr 14, 2019
Bird's nest soup?
+2
Level 82
May 22, 2014
Damn! I read it as "dessert" until I read this comment and went back to check. Even when I checked the answer I was like "weird that 60% know about a dessert like that because I never heard of it". Yes OF COURSE, I know a desert called that. *major facepalm*
+1
Level 63
Feb 1, 2016
Oh my god, it all makes sense now.
+3
Level 62
Jul 3, 2017
Count me as one of the "end of the meal dish" seekers. Duh. Even after I saw the answer, I thought, "There's a dessert called Gobi? Like the desert? Oh! Wait..."
+1
Level 31
Apr 14, 2019
Just when I thought I was the only one...
+1
Level 26
Jun 26, 2013
I knew the soup answer, but not the spelling. I spelt it as Gespatcho, gaspacho, gespacho and gaspatcho.
+9
Level 44
Aug 21, 2013
No soup for you!
+1
Level 20
Feb 10, 2014
Haha
+1
Level 58
Nov 23, 2020
I similarly screwed up Giovanni
+1
Level 71
Jul 31, 2013
About the name: Gianni is another form of "John" in Italian. Also, Giuseppe has been more common than Giovanni for baby names in Italy before. So, I think either all 3 should be accepted, or find another question. Drove me nuts.

Same for the Goteborg question.

+2
Level 71
Aug 1, 2015
Giuseppe is the Italian version of Joseph, not John.
+2
Level 37
Jul 1, 2018
I believe that "Gianni" is to Giovanni as "Jack" is to John, or "Jon" is to Jonathan.
+15
Level 65
Jan 7, 2014
For Elvis' residence I put Grave but that didn't work so I tried the name of his previous residence...
+2
Level 69
Mar 1, 2014
Unless he's still out there.... just kidding.
+1
Level 67
Jun 4, 2014
100% with 2:17 left
+2
Level 59
Dec 15, 2014
Wrote Guayana and gulash... you really should be more flexible...
+1
Level 62
Dec 3, 2020
I like Guayana - pronunciation like "wayana" :)
+4
Level 77
May 23, 2015
Thank you Red Dwarf for Gazpacho Soup.
+1
Level 45
Jun 9, 2015
aw! I kept spelling it goolash
+1
Level 59
Jun 9, 2015
Did you know.... Argentinian pampas gauchos are the main workers on an estancia.
+1
Level 70
Jan 30, 2016
If you want to read about the real Gauchos read Charles Darwin's "Voyage of the Beagle"
+1
Level 37
Dec 9, 2017
You mean like Cowboys are the main workers on a ranch? (double Duh!)
+2
Level 78
Jan 30, 2016
Thank goodness for Tom Lehrer, without whom I would not have known the answer to the Mexican question.
+2
Level 79
Aug 19, 2017
Hahaha! I owe a lot of my knowledge to Tom Lehrer. Not sure my therapist would be pleased to hear that, though.
+1
Level 70
Jun 9, 2016
I keep seeing "Chinese dessert" and thought, they don't serve desserts, only orange slices (from US). :-)
+1
Level 68
Mar 19, 2019
That's not true :) (I live in China)
+1
Level 44
Sep 26, 2016
Never heard of the Spanish soup or would have been a full house.
+4
Level 37
Mar 7, 2017
What is the problem with accepting native spellings as well as English spellings? (as long as both are spelled correctly). Would

you not feel offended if quiz makers in other countries only accepted Nieuw Amsterdam for New York, or Haarlem for Harlem?

I know that this is an English language quiz but we should never

disallow native spelling.

+1
Level 62
Dec 3, 2020
If I was taking a Spanish quiz and it accepted English variants of names (e.g. London) I'd be very confused..
+1
Level 73
Jun 26, 2017
Gazpacho is super delicious, so is goulash.
+1
Level 37
Jul 11, 2017
Yes! - But only when made by natives. The uniquely American add-ins spoil their authenticity.
+3
Level ∞
Jun 22, 2018
One thing I've learned in traveling the world is that quality food can be found anywhere. I traveled for a couple months in France and never once had a croissant that is better than the ones at my local bakery in Seattle.
+4
Level 70
Apr 14, 2019
You don't make friends with salad.
+2
Level 83
Apr 14, 2019
@tshalla I'll join that Conga line! ;)
+1
Level 83
Apr 14, 2019
Yes! Second Simpsons reference in the comments section on Jetpunk I've run across today!
+1
Level 83
Apr 14, 2019
I'm curious, I've never had either dish (and as a vegetarian I don't think I'll ever try goulash) but what are the "uniquely American add-ins"?
+1
Level 78
Apr 17, 2019
Why would you think an American can't follow an authentic recipe? We don't always add ketchup to everything.
+1
Level 58
Nov 23, 2020
Not only am I not a fan of Ketchup ever, but a large part of it is sugar, as well. Honestly, my one experience abroad in Costa Rica, I loved all the food, and just about nothing had any sugar in it. Pretty sure I lost weight just eating there. Also, the pizza was better than one of Casey's grease mats.
+1
Level 62
Dec 3, 2020
By far the best spaghetti bolognese I ever had was in an Argentinian restaurant in Ecuador. 🤷
+1
Level 58
Dec 4, 2020
You can find great food everywhere, and certainly in the US, where, in addition to a host of uniquely American inventions, there are many many talented people who can re-create authentic foreign cuisine perfectly. That being said, I feel that certain countries, on average, take food and authenticity of food more seriously than many Americans seem to. As a French person myself, I obviously believe that it's everyone's right to eat whatever they want, to mix whatever they want whatever they want. I also think that you can create beautiful things by fusing different food styles, or by making foreign recipes your own. However, I think there should be a minimum of respect for authentic recipes, and you should, whenever possible, try the authentic recipe, and acknowledge it when you make changes. For instance, if you make carbonara with cream, don't call it carbonara, because it's not a carbonara. You may of course still enjoy it, but it's something else.
+1
Level 58
Dec 4, 2020
If you put cheese and ham on a croissant, or really anything else than maybe butter or a little jam, don't call it a croissant, because it's something else - and certainly don't pretend that it's "French", because it isn't.
+1
Level 58
Dec 4, 2020
I think that's what people object to. I'm sure there is fantastic pizza in Miami and amazing croissants in Seattle (I've never been to either of those places) - but I can imagine that there's also very different things that call themselves "authentic pizza" or "French croissant", and have nothing to do with the originals. That doesn't mean that they aren't good, but they're something else. I'm sure, as Jetpunkers, we can all agree on the need to properly name things!
+1
Level 37
Jul 1, 2018
That may be true of a croissant, but try ordering a Pizza in Miami. FL or Boston Clam Chowder in Atlanta, GA and you'll understand my point better.
+1
Level 46
Apr 14, 2019
I'm sure there's plenty of amazing pizza in Miami. Heck, half the city is transplants from NY and NJ. And the other half is Cubans. It's one of the southernmost cities in the country and it's not even southern.

The Atlanta clam chowder thing is probably true though.

+1
Level 58
Nov 23, 2020
Well, most of Florida's population is pretty recent compared to the rest of the deep south. It was also never as dependent on the same crops, and was mostly a swamp (you think the Everglades are big now?) before the 20th century. And now it's part of the sun Belt, which has mostly skipped over the deep south.
+1
Level 42
Jan 25, 2019
I kinda like how Gal-ap-a-gos rolls right off of your tounge.
+1
Level 70
Apr 15, 2019
What's a 'Tounge'?
+1
Level 62
Dec 3, 2020
The 'tounge', (pron. 'tunj') is a small protrusion just below the larynx where syllables are kept just before they're spoken.
+1
Level 20
Mar 21, 2019
You should add Guatemala. Or Georgia. (Both the state AND the country.)
+1
Level 70
May 29, 2019
Georgia is already in the quiz. Look in the second column, the 4th from the bottom.
+1
Level 58
Nov 23, 2020
Can we talk about how many small American towns are named after large cities elsewhere?
+1
Level 61
Apr 14, 2019
Got there with 1:52 left.
+1
Level 66
Apr 15, 2019
Please accept "Great Lake" for "Great Lakes".
+1
Level 45
Mar 30, 2020
yes true
+1
Level 67
Jun 21, 2019
I read chinese dessert.... And Thought, dont think I know any chinese desserts...
+1
Level 45
Mar 30, 2020
yeah same
+1
Level 45
Mar 30, 2020
I thought it was chinese dessert at first and I was like ??? what could it be
+1
Level 45
Mar 30, 2020
accept "great lake" for great lakes
+1
Level 67
Jul 21, 2020
More lenience on the Hungarian soup? I tried gulash, gulasch, goulasch and even gulyásleves.
+1
Level 55
Jul 21, 2020
I knew the Mexican city, in theory, but there was no way I would be able to spell it. Guessing I'm not the only one, given the percentage. :-)
+1
Level 61
Jul 23, 2020
Please accept "Great Lake" for "Great Lakes." The clue notes those lakes are an example of a great lake- singular. The answer great lakes is plural.
+2
Level 58
Nov 23, 2020
Because collectively, they are called the 'Great Lakes'. I have not once heard anyone refer to a single one as a 'Great Lake'.
+2
Level 60
Sep 7, 2020
Goulash and Gazpacho aren't "geographical" answers.
+1
Level 58
Dec 4, 2020
Any description of gazpacho probably starts with "a Spanish...", which sounds pretty geographical to me.