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Geography by Letter - J

Guess these geographical answers that start with the letter J.
Last updated: September 05, 2018
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Hint
Answer
"Land of the Rising Sun"
Japan
Capital of Indonesia
Jakarta
Island where you'd find the above
Java
King David's capital city
Jerusalem
Cajun dish similar to paella
Jambalaya
Major city in Florida
Jacksonville
Capital of Alaska
Juneau
French version of the name John
Jean
Largest city in South Africa
Johannesburg
Musical genre that got its start
in New Orleans
Jazz
Hint
Answer
Peninsula forming most of Denmark
Jutland
Religion that follows the Torah
Judaism
Indian city or style of horse-riding pants
Jodhpur
Largest of the Channel Islands
Jersey
Non-violent Indian religion
Jainism
First permanent English settlement in America
Jamestown
Island where reggae music originated
Jamaica
Soccer team from Turin
Juventus
Capital of South Sudan
Juba
River that connects the Dead Sea
and the Sea of Galilee
Jordan
+18
level 75
Oct 2, 2013
Only 24% got Jainism? If I was a Jain I'd be so mad.. I'd.. I'd.. angrily punch a pillow, after I had it tested for microorganisms so that I was sure my outburst wouldn't inadvertently harm any bacteria or dust mites.
+1
level 64
Oct 2, 2013
Like!
+1
level 57
Oct 2, 2013
But to test it for microorganisms surely you'd risk harming some...
+1
level 48
Dec 21, 2013
LOLLL!
+1
level 55
Apr 29, 2015
haha I knew it, but for some reason didn't think of it. So annoyed with myself for not remembering it.
+2
level 67
Apr 30, 2015
I tried 23 different spellings of a word I've only heard....... Jaism .... Jayism .......jaayist........jayistism etc etc ........ dohhhhhhh
+4
level 66
Mar 11, 2016
Jay-Zism.
+1
level 58
Mar 11, 2016
It seems strange that we have to classify religions as "non-violent".
+2
level 58
Mar 11, 2016
Yes...yes it does. Of course 'tis said that if one person believes it, they're crazy, if hundreds believe it, it's a cult - if millions believe it...yep...it's a religion.
+2
level 54
Mar 22, 2016
Jains are so serious about it, they're practically militantly non-violent!
+4
level 75
May 17, 2018
We don't have to, but as long as we're going to, Jainism is the only one that really fits the bill. Buddhism, maybe in distant 2nd place. Calling any of the Abrahamic religions non-violent, or religions of peace, particularly the most violent of the lot of them, is a bad joke. And since we so often do it maks Jainism stand out all the more as an example of why this cliche is a non-sequitur.
+2
level 23
Mar 14, 2016
Quizmaster- please add a like button!
+1
level 23
Aug 4, 2016
I stick by the above message
+1
level 45
Oct 19, 2016
hahahha^^^^^^^^^
+1
level 42
Oct 2, 2013
Well, I got really stuck on the French version of the name John because of the familiar song, Frère Jacques. I kept trying to enter Jacques, thinking it had to be it. Finally I realized that Jacques must be Jack, not John. So why does the English translation say "Brother John"? And - now that I think of it - Jack IS a nickname for John, so technically Jacques IS correct.
+2
level 28
Oct 2, 2013
Jacques means Jacob or James. It is sometimes translated to Jack but it isn't correct.
+1
level 44
Aug 8, 2014
If you were to translate Jack into French, wouldn't it be Jacques? "Jacques et le Haricot Magiques."
+1
level 65
Nov 5, 2014
It's actually translated as "Jack et le haricot magique".
+1
level 65
Nov 5, 2014
However, I concurr - Jean is John (or Jack), and Jacques is Jacob (or James, Jim). In Spanish, they're Juan and Tiago, in German Johannes and Jakob, in Italian Giovanni and Giacomo... It's fun how languages differ, all from the same two Hebrew roots!
+1
level 55
Apr 29, 2015
I believe the common form of James in Spanish is Diego.
+1
level 58
Mar 11, 2016
It's Iago, hence "Santiago"
+1
level 59
Mar 13, 2016
^ It's both, actually. James comes originally from the Hebrew for Jacob, which is where the New Testament-era "Iacobus" (Latin) comes from. "Iacobus" developed into modern-day "Jacob", and our "James" comes from "Iacobus" being altered to "Iacomus" via a gradual verbal pronunciation change. Hence, Diego, Iago, Jaime, and Jacobo are all valid Spanish variations of James.
+1
level 59
Mar 13, 2016
But besides all that, I do agree with @emwcee that Jacques is a valid answer. I understand that Jean is more correct, but I tried Jacques first too. Then again, I think maybe Jacques is just the first French male name that probably pops into most people's heads? Especially when given "J" as the first letter.
+1
level 27
Nov 7, 2016
Bit late to be answering maybe, but I speak French as a close to first second language and my first guess was Jacques too...
+1
level 49
Oct 3, 2013
I'd have thought the largest island in the English Channel is the Isle of Wight at 148 sq miles - Jersey is only 46 sq miles...
+1
level ∞
Oct 3, 2013
My mistake. I changed the clue to "Largest of the Channel Islands".
+1
level 65
Nov 13, 2014
I was thinking of the Channel Islands off the coast of California and was very confused.
+1
level 67
Oct 19, 2013
David did not found Jerusalem. The city existed even before Joshua conquered the Promised Land. David just simply captured it from the Canaanites and made it his capital, so that question should be remade.
+1
level 55
Apr 29, 2015
Though I think it went by a different name before that. Perhaps I'm not remembering correctly. But you are right, technically, he did not found the city.
+1
level 75
Mar 11, 2016
Agree. He was the one to make it the capital city. It had existed long before.
+1
level 75
May 17, 2018
Cities are often founded or re-founded on the site (or nearby the site) of older, pre-existing cities, villages, or settlements.
+1
level ∞
Jun 29, 2018
Changed the clue
+1
level 55
Apr 26, 2014
I don't follow soccer or know anything about countries younger than 20 years.
+3
level 77
May 23, 2014
You probably have trouble with some of these quizzes then, Congratulations!
+1
level 69
May 1, 2014
I knew Jainism, I just couldn't spell it.
+1
level 68
Jun 25, 2014
More exceptions for "jambalaya" would be extremely helpful
+1
level 32
Apr 14, 2015
Wait, this isn't all geography. It threw me.
+2
level ∞
Aug 2, 2015
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_geography
+1
level 14
Mar 11, 2016
Can you add Jylland as an answer to Peninsula forming most of Denmark. (the danish word for it)
+1
level 44
Oct 6, 2016
Ja, Jylland er bedre!
+1
level 55
Jun 14, 2016
James Town was originally two words when the British settled it, then changed to one word later.
+1
level 59
Jan 10, 2017
I didn't know it so I guessed John Town... I wasn't far wrong.
+1
level 54
Oct 19, 2016
The danish peninsula is not Jutland, it is Jylland
+2
level 49
Dec 28, 2016
I believe it can be both.
+1
level 33
Nov 23, 2016
28 for juba???
+1
level 38
Jan 10, 2017
I have found that non-native English speakers are much better spellers (or maybe they memorize better) than native English speakers.
+1
level 36
Jul 23, 2017
Why do a bunch of these quizzes ask for another version of the name john?
+1
level 45
Dec 1, 2017
I put Jupiter instead of Jacksonville for the Florida question... So close.
+1
level 59
Jan 18, 2018
Why must my soccer/football knowledge be so poor! Ohh right...I'm American, and hate sports...
+2
level 59
May 17, 2018
How does John/Jean have anything to do with geography? I get that's a name in French which spoken in France which is on a map. The geographical aspect to the question is given in the hint. At that point it's just knowing a name in another language. I like these quizzes but that irks me enough to apparently write a paragraph about it.
+1
level ∞
Jun 29, 2018
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_geography
+1
level 45
Mar 14, 2019
What do jazz and cajun food have to do with geography?