Science General Knowledge #1

Answer these random questions from the realm of science.
Quiz idea and some questions from Kestrana
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: December 22, 2019
First submittedMay 15, 2016
Times taken52,875
Rating4.54
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Question
Answer
In what galaxy is the solar system located?
Milky Way
What species is the closest living relative to humans?
Chimpanzees
What is equal to mass times acceleration?
Force
What is the chemical formula for water?
H2O
Who was the first person to see the moons of Jupiter?
Galileo Galilei
What is the hardest known naturally-occurring material?
Diamond
What type of mineral is pencil "lead" made from?
Graphite
What element are both of the above minerals made from?
Carbon
The sun is currently a yellow dwarf. What type of star will it become in
about 5 billion years?
Red Giant
What are the two types of particles in the nucleus of an atom?
Proton
Neutron
What Polish astronomer postulated that the Sun is the center of the solar system?
Nicolaus Copernicus
What process do plants use to turn light into energy?
Photosynthesis
Where would you find Olympus Mons?
Mars
What does a chronometer measure?
Time
What is the duodenum a part of?
Small Intestine
What type of sugar does the brain use for energy?
Glucose
Two elements of the Periodic Table are named after U.S. states.
Name either element.
Californium or
Tennessine
What is the largest asteroid in the solar system?
Ceres
What do most humans have 23 pairs of?
Chromosomes
+16
Level 85
May 16, 2016
Though it is located in the asteroid belt, the answer you list for the largest asteroid is not actually an asteroid. It was promoted to dwarf planet status years ago. I suggest you change the question to read: "What is the largest object orbiting within the solar system's asteroid belt?"
+2
Level 72
Jun 7, 2016
Was just about to post the same thing. +1.
+2
Level 62
Jul 20, 2016
I thought the same, but the fastidious, possibly picayune writers/editors on Wikipedia state that Ceres is both a dwarf planet and an asteroid.
+21
Level 84
Jun 16, 2017
A plasteroid, if you will.
+1
Level 16
Jun 30, 2017
^ I love it
+1
Level 56
Aug 27, 2018
Then, I won't
+1
Level 81
Nov 13, 2018
The writers of Wikipedia are anyone with an internet connection.
+1
Level 67
Dec 20, 2018
@GeographyGeek42 Im sure the plasteroid would not mind to be loved by both of you
+6
Level 79
Jul 20, 2016
Ceres is a dwarf planet and an asteroid, just as Pluto is a dwarf planet and a Trans-Neptunian Object, a Kuipier belt Object, and a Plutino. All minor planets between Mars and Jupiter are asteroids, even if they are also dwarf planets.
+2
Level 39
Dec 11, 2016
There is are still many arguments about ceres, it's shaped like you would expect a asteroid to be but is incredibly large..
+1
Level ∞
Mar 13, 2020
As Quizley and sumguy have pointed out, Ceres is both an asteroid and a dwarf planet. The question is correct as written.
+1
Level 58
Mar 28, 2020
Nasa considers it a dwarf planet. That's enough for me.
+1
Level 50
Oct 13, 2020
I was surprised by this question as well, but quizmaster is correct. Learned something new today! Very cool.
+1
Level 58
Mar 28, 2020
Vesta or whatever is the actual largest asteroid should be acceptable even if Jetpunk insists on Ceres as an answer.
+1
Level 50
Jul 20, 2016
Missed Copernicus and Ceres. For shame!
+1
Level 66
Mar 13, 2019
I missed those two (and only those two) as well!
+1
Level 59
Jul 20, 2016
Damn all you fancy-shmancy Latin names, Estonians simply call it "kaksteistsõrmiksool" ("twelve-finger-intestine"). P.S. I have absolutely no idea why.
+5
Level 62
Jul 20, 2016
As duodenum comes from the Latin for "in twelves," the pattern holds.
+1
Level 67
Dec 20, 2018
my latin isnt that well so immediately believe you. It is well enough to sort of go ow yea after your comment, but I would ve expected duodecum (or similar) then.
+3
Level 70
Jul 20, 2016
The 'Fancy-shmancy Latin names' you mention make it possible for all nations and languages to have a common scientific names for all people. What use would it be if the official international name for the 'Duodenum' was 'kaksteistsormiksool' and dodekadaktlylos and zwollffingerdarm etc etc ........ nobody would have a clue what they were talking about. Every doctor/scientist in the world understands what the word 'Duodenum' is referring to.
+1
Level 67
Dec 20, 2018
we call it twaalfvingerige darm so the same. I was curious if duodenum was the every day common english name for it or the offical? like tailbone and coccyx for instance. or collarbone/clavicle.
+1
Level 66
Mar 24, 2020
Duodenum is the normal word sifhraven, no-one calls it the "twelve-fingery-intestine" in English. Just to be helpful - I know adverbs don't come naturally to Dutch speakers - where you say "my latin isn't that well", it sounds like it has a cold, or maybe something worse, God forbid. You mean it isn't that good.
+1
Level 71
Jul 20, 2016
As of Jun 2016, you need to allow Tennessine as an element named after a US state
+1
Level 88
Jul 20, 2016
Think that's jumping the gun a bit, as the name hasn't been confirmed yet. Last timeline I saw put approval likely in November.
+2
Level 61
Jul 20, 2016
I never knew Copernicus was Polish. That's hardly a Polish last name.
+7
Level 73
Jul 20, 2016
He was born as Mikołaj Kopernik. In those days scientists, writers, composers and such folk used to give a Latin ring to their names, to give them more street cred.
+1
Level 65
Jul 21, 2016
This is a very interesting piece of information. I knew Copernicus was Polish, but I had always wondered about his name.
+1
Level 41
Aug 24, 2016
Pretty sure there's some element of myth wrapped up in Copernicus. As though he smashed established thought regarding celestial movement, when actually it was generally accepted that the earth was round and went round the sun. Galileo in his war against the church made a lot of brash statements that kind of left a legacy of the church propogating ignorance, but according to the sources I've read, the immanence just doesn't seem to have been there.
+1
Level 81
Nov 13, 2018
It was his gangsta rap name?
+2
Level 73
Mar 28, 2020
There seems to be no source calling him Mikołaj Kopernik during his lifetime. He was spelled Niclas Koppernigk, Nicolaus Kopperlingk, Nicolaus Copernik, Nicolaus Cop(p)ernicus, Nicolaus Coppernic(k), Nicolaus Coppernig, Nicolaj Copphernicj. Fixed spelling wasn't a thing back then. See here and here.
+2
Level 70
Mar 6, 2018
Aristarchus of Samos was an ancient Greek scholar that first wrote about the earth and planets going round the sun. Copernicus in his notes to be published gave credence to Aristarchus as the first. Copernicus' editors convinced him to cross out any reference to Aristarchus and his claim to be the first made him famous.
+1
Level 48
Mar 28, 2020
was also going to point this out
+1
Level 66
Jul 21, 2016
element named after US State? "Tennessine! Tennissine! Tennissine!" shouts the man from Tennessee. (New name for element 117) :)
+1
Level 65
Jul 21, 2016
That sounds like the opening to a country song.
+2
Level 67
Jul 28, 2016
It's the opening line of my new single, "Tennesseein' is Tennebelievin'"
+1
Level 42
Apr 21, 2018
should have been oakridgium and sung by ... well, you know
+1
Level 77
Dec 4, 2016
It's been official since last Monday (28th November 2016) – the 18th question has two possible answers :)
+1
Level ∞
Dec 5, 2016
Updated!
+1
Level 7
Feb 22, 2017
Ceres is now a dwarf planet, the new biggest asteroid is 4Vesta.
+2
Level 67
Aug 2, 2019
Ceres is a dwarf planet, but it is also still an asteroid.
+7
Level 75
Mar 6, 2018
With so many answers being from astronomy, I thought for sure that the answer to "Duodenum" would be Uranus.
+2
Level 57
Mar 6, 2018
^Winner
+1
Level 44
Aug 27, 2018
lol
+3
Level 74
Jul 6, 2018
Not sure if you really need to give the "synthesis" part of the 12th question's answer. It's already easy enough to guess. We all learned the word in elementary school...
+1
Level 69
Aug 18, 2018
https://www.jetpunk.com/user-quizzes/290321/name-the-blood-cell
+1
Level 59
Oct 2, 2018
The "fun fact" answer to the hardest material question may be diamond, but this is not actually true. https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16610-diamond-no-longer-natures-hardest-material/
+1
Level 81
Nov 13, 2018
You had the 46th comment. It should've been about chromosomes.
+1
Level 59
Mar 13, 2019
You had the 47th. It should have been about Kalashnikov rifles.
+1
Level ∞
Mar 13, 2020
Science journalism makes me mad. The headline to that article is garbage. If you read the article, you'll see that those materials are "predicted" to be harder than diamond, but it can't be tested because they are so incredibly rare. Diamond is still the correct answer until someone proves otherwise.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superhard_material

+1
Level 67
Dec 20, 2018
18/20 :) happy with that as on average I tend to go more towards three quarters of correct answers. I guess it was because this was more sciency, no sports, hardly history and all international questions. MIssed ceres, and allmost had red giant correct. Couldnt get it, tried red dwarf, red star, red sun ( out of desperation) supernova even black hole haha, though my first thought was red soemthing
+1
Level 67
Dec 20, 2018
hahaha ok... only now I see that this wasnt a general knowledge but a science general knowledge. Well arent scientists known to be a bit scatterbrained hahaha (I opened this quiz yesterday, by clicking on random so didnt read it well, and only actually took it today, because it was after midnight already yesterday) It explains Everything!!
+1
Level 67
Dec 20, 2018
Also why I put brinta in my tea last week.. wait no that was because of lack of sleep...(for which this site is partially responsible, but mainly health reasons)
+1
Level 59
Mar 13, 2019
Why does it specify that it is the brain that uses glucose for energy? The entirety of the body uses it, not just the brain.
+1
Level 67
Mar 13, 2019
Because the question is about the brain.
+1
Level 59
Mar 25, 2019
So why is the answer glucose? Glucose has nothing directly to do with the brain.
+3
Level 67
Aug 2, 2019
Sure it does. The brain uses it for energy.
+1
Level 33
Mar 30, 2020
It's an unfortunately worded question which only biologists would really understand. The brain doesn't have the capacity to break down glycogen, use proteins or lipids for energy production. The rest of the body can do this by inserting various metabolites from breaking these down, into the Krebs or citric acid cycle. The brain relies upon the rest of the body to supply it with glucose from food or the breakdown of glycogen. Only in very extreme circumstances can it use ketones, and that causes physical damage to the blood brain barrier and the brain itself due to the extensive high levels of ketones in the blood that would enable them to infiltrate the central nervous system. The question is basically asking 'What is typically the only substance the brain can use for energy?'
+1
Level 21
Apr 16, 2019
Yes it does actually
+1
Level 21
Apr 16, 2019
18/20 and just turned 13 yasss 7th grade science in Hawaii lol
+1
Level 21
Apr 16, 2019
Yessuh Marlowe I like the simplicity
+1
Level 73
Jan 22, 2020
This was a fun quiz.
+1
Level 66
Jan 23, 2020
I've tried, out of curiosity, to answer "H20" (meaning H-twenty) to the water question, and, to my surprise, the answer was considered to be correct. I really think it shouldn't be, since it is inherently wrong. Water molecule doesn't have 20 hydrogen atoms, and if some people don't know that, they should be educated, not kept in their ignorance, by accepting the wrong answer.
+1
Level 56
Mar 28, 2020
Could you add "grafite" as a type-in?
+1
Level 50
Mar 28, 2020
C6H12O6 should work for glucose
+1
Level 47
May 20, 2020
No, disagree, a lot of compounds other than glucose have this formula.
+1
Level 58
Mar 28, 2020
I would like to point out that mass times acceleration is not equal to simply Force it is equal to net force along a certain axis.
+1
Level 17
Mar 31, 2020
First quiz (out of 90+) i got 100%
+1
Level 48
Apr 3, 2020
Maybe a nitpick, but the term "yellow dwarf" is not technically correct. The peak spectral output of the sun is actually in the blue-green range. The sun appears yellow on Earth due to atmospheric scattering. "Dwarf" can be argued, as it is opposed to "giant," but the accepted terminology is "main sequence star." It doesn't really affect the way people guess the answer, thoguh, I suppose.
+1
Level 54
May 28, 2020
How do three times as many people know about the duodenum than Ceres?
+1
Level 36
Oct 17, 2020
WOW i did really good :D