Synonymous Trademarks Quiz

We give you the generic term. You give us the brand name that means the same thing.
Some of these only apply in certain countries, sorry
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: August 30, 2018
First submittedSeptember 22, 2010
Times taken45,236
Rating3.78
5:00
Enter trademark here:
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 / 24 guessed
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Generic Term
Trademark
Artificial turf
AstroTurf
Adhesive bandage
Band-Aid
Bleach
Clorox
Lip balm
ChapStick
Flying disc
Frisbee
Web search
Google
4-Wheel drive vehicle
Jeep
Gelatin dessert
Jell-O
Stadium-size television
JumboTron
Facial tissue
Kleenex
Elevator music
Muzak
Sticky notes
Post-Its
Generic Term
Trademark
Cotton swabs
Q-Tips
Vacuum-sealed beverage holder
Thermos
Inline skates
Rollerblades
Clear tape
Scotch Tape
Swim briefs
Speedo
Stun gun
Taser
Acetaminophen
Tylenol
Petroleum jelly
Vaseline
Vacuum cleaner
Hoover
Recreational vehicle
Winnebago
Photocopier
Xerox
Portable tape player
Walkman
+1
Level 74
Sep 22, 2010
Clever...Nice work!
+1
Level 32
Jul 28, 2011
We always called bleach Javex. That's the most common form of bleach in Canada.
+1
Level 43
Aug 12, 2014
thats what I kept trying too! (I am canadian)
+1
Level 38
Dec 4, 2015
me 4 haha I used to live in Canada but now I work in new Zealand
+1
Level 79
Nov 29, 2015
Ditto.
+1
Level 67
Jun 7, 2016
me too! I had no idea that this was a Canadian thing tho. I tried javex and couldn't think of anything else.
+1
Level 44
Dec 23, 2016
I've never heard of it...
+8
Level 57
Aug 19, 2011
Damn, 9. Extremely hard if you're British, or from anywhere that isn't America (or Canada)
+1
Level 50
Jul 18, 2017
It's hard in America, too.
+1
Level 80
Aug 19, 2017
Found it pretty easy and most of these things are popular outside of the USA, too. Some are not even American.
+1
Level 80
Feb 4, 2018
the equivalent of Tylenol in Saudi Arabia would be Panadol. Many of these others they also use there or I'm not sure if there is an equivalent.
+4
Level 77
Feb 25, 2019
Maybe the Gulf has lots of US products or something. Few of these are popular in Europe. I got most from movies and internet, in real life we use (a form of) 7 of these.
+1
Level 33
Sep 10, 2011
This was fun, and I hate that I missed any.
+1
Level 44
Nov 9, 2011
Lol @JusSpammin, too much Transformers for you. 14/24 and I'm from Australia, pretty happy with that. Although I do watch copious amounts of US tv and movies, so it would be pretty sad if I hadn't picked anything up.
+3
Level 81
Feb 24, 2012
In UK. bleach is usually Domestos: clear tape is Sellotape: four-wheel drive could be Landrover: Adhesive bandage is Elastoplast.

Difficult of non-Americans this one.

+1
Level 82
Apr 19, 2018
Non-american here, and the only ones I had never heard of were chlorox, jumbotron and muzak. Didn't realise jeep was considered such a generic term though. Got the rest of the american-terms from hearing them on tv. Anyone else just get QTip from scrubs?
+1
Level 49
Mar 29, 2012
How long before Dyson replaces Hoover as the generic term for a vacuum cleaner?
+1
Level 79
Jun 15, 2014
My first try was Electrolux. I AM old!
+1
Level 77
Nov 27, 2015
Probably a long while. I don't know anyone who calls it a Dyson.
+1
Level 46
Mar 9, 2016
I've never heard anyone call a vacuum a hoover. I've always just heart vacuum.
+1
Level 77
Apr 16, 2016
Hoover is a very common British term.
+1
Level 58
Jun 5, 2016
I used to work customer service and an older man once told me, 'hang on dear, I was just Hoovering the rug, let me turn it off so I can hear you'. He was a Southerner (US).
+1
Level 53
Jan 8, 2019
It will be a long time before Dyson replaces hoover, they are a nightmare to empty! I'm sticking with hoover bags, much much cheaper and much much easier
+1
Level 20
May 17, 2012
No idea what a winebego is, although the word sounds vaguely familiar
+1
Level 53
May 13, 2015
It's a brand of motor home.
+2
Level 32
Jan 10, 2013
A taser (with wire-connected sharp projectiles that stick into a target, and is usually sold only to police forces) is a different thing from a stun gun (which is sold to consumers and features contacts you have to touch to the target and activate).
+1
Level 79
Nov 27, 2015
You are correct that they are not the same thing and work in different ways, but there are civilian versions of Tasers available to the public. The Taser currently available to civilians in the US will fire up to 15 feet. Those available to law enforcement personnel can fire up to 21 feet. Currently only five states completely prohibit civilian use of Tasers - New York, New Jersey, Hawaii, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts, - but some cities have their own rules, and some states have specific rules to follow for ownership. http://www.defenseproducts101.com/statestatutesummary_page2.html
+1
Level 17
Apr 5, 2013
Was "astro" not enough for artificial grass?
+2
Level 67
Dec 13, 2016
"Astro" was the dog in the Jetsons, not artificial grass.
+1
Level 75
Jul 8, 2019
There is another, far older, meaning of astro
+2
Level 80
May 4, 2013
Nice quiz. What about Coke and Polaroid?
+1
Level 80
May 4, 2013
Also Discman, though you already have Walkman. For a while video game systems became synonymous with Atari, and then after that Nintendo... Sony tried to do the same thing with PlayStation. They chose the name because it was supposed to be simply and catchy and something that eventually people would use to talk about all video game systems just like Walkman and Discman... but in spite of the PS2 being the belling selling console of all time this strategy never really worked.
+1
Level 80
Aug 19, 2017
Australians use "PlayStation" to refer to all video game consoles?
+2
Level 53
Jan 8, 2019
I'm not picking on you, I know that's a sore point, but do you often have conversations with yourself?
+1
Level 80
Jan 8, 2019
I wasn't. Someone had replied here. Their comment is gone now. I assume they are one of the users that got wiped out when QM purged inactive accounts.
+2
Level 35
Jul 14, 2013
I haven't even heard of most of these. It's be great if you could say that it's based on American words or add British equivalents as acceptable answers.
+2
Level 35
Oct 1, 2013
This is essentially an American Synonymous Trademarks Quiz. Band aid, qtip, scotch tape, xerox, jello are all things I struggled with. I would call each of those things: plaster, ear bud, sellotape, photocopier and jelly.
+1
Level 67
Jan 8, 2019
It is, but changing the us ones for uk ones wouldnt make a big difference for the rest of the world. Just as easy/hard on average (sometimes I know american terms better, sometimes the uk ones) but I must admit, first thing I thought off was cellotape (which apparently isnt spelled like that..) then i, tried ducttape.. then gaffertape (all first without tape) was allready proud of all of those. Then I remembered scotch tape which I think I have only ever heard once, but it stuck with me (hahaha) because i thought what do the Scotch/Scottish have to do with them them!! Or scotch (whisky) I think I was young haha
+3
Level 66
Apr 24, 2014
couldn't get past 'budgie smugglers' for swimming briefs
+1
Level 46
Apr 28, 2014
i've never heard anyone say Muzak or Hoover
+1
Level ∞
Jul 8, 2015
Hoover is British only.
+2
Level 82
May 5, 2014
Facial tissue - I kept thinking about a skin sample and got nowhere. Tissue in the medical sense. I know what a kleenex is, but as a non-British European I never thought of it as "facial tissue". Though it's probably right :)

Other difficult ones: food processor (never heard of it), jumbotron (tried megatron though), bleach (never heard), recreational vehicle (never heard). I should've gotten band-aid and chapstick though, but didn't. Had 17/24.

+1
Level 67
Jan 8, 2019
Yea same here, I was thinking of fat and muscles etc... never heard the term facial tissue. I got it, in the end, but if it had just said tissue I would ve gotten it mucch faster or wipes or something
+1
Level 69
May 7, 2014
Rebound tumbler - Trampoline
+1
Level 35
Sep 5, 2014
Hey guys! I am new to JetPunk. Please check out my quizzes and let me know what you think! :-)
+1
Level 28
Sep 18, 2014
Ibuprofen should also work for acetaminophen
+1
Level 41
Jun 16, 2016
Paracetamol you mean; which is synonymous with acetaminophen. Therefore "Panadol" being the brand name should be accepted. Ibuprofen is an anti-inflammatory drug, with a different chemical composition.
+2
Level 80
Nov 27, 2015
Another good one would be "White Out," though I discovered working for a British company the UK equivalent is Tippix.
+1
Level 81
Nov 27, 2015
Think it's Tipp-ex.
+1
Level 72
Jan 24, 2019
Here it's known as Liquid Paper, although I'd imagine it's not a product often seen in modern offices
+1
Level 65
Nov 27, 2015
Biro would be a good one.
+1
Level 45
Nov 27, 2015
Lipsyl should be accepted for the lip balm as that's what it is in the UK
+1
Level 58
Nov 27, 2015
Never heard of that, and if I was to ask you for a lip balm, I'd ask for a chapstick, and I didn't even know it was a brand name. That, pretty much, is the point of the quiz.
+1
Level 77
Jun 8, 2016
It's lypsyl, but I agree it should be accepted. I haven't heard it in a while but I'm sure at one point the term was really common.
+1
Level 67
Jan 8, 2019
Labello is the generic name here for it, coming from a brandname. I never knew chapstick was a brand, allways thought it was the english name for it, same with rollerblades.
+1
Level 36
Nov 27, 2015
As a Brit, seriously?! Accept Jelly, Sellotape, Plaster, cotton buds... And a recreational vehicle is a winnebago? wtf
+2
Level 67
Nov 27, 2015
Are those brand names? Because if not, you're completely missing the point of this quiz.
+1
Level 58
Nov 27, 2015
As a Brit it becomes about how much American culture you've absorbed through decades of sitcoms. I found it relatively easy. Ironically the one I missed, the bleach, is a product I've actually bought, twenty years ago in Kuwait. Couldn't make it come to mind. I even knew the headache tablet because of a Gary Larson cartoon, but elsewhere I've suggested they accept aspirin, because that too is a brand name. (As is heroin!)
+1
Level 76
Nov 27, 2015
What Americans know as Scotch Tape we "Brits" call Sellotape. but back in the 1970's, when the BBC had very strict rules regarding brand names, the presenters of Blue Peter faithfully referred to it as Sticky Back Plastic...

Yes, utterly daft... :)

+1
Level 64
Nov 27, 2015
Erm, no. Sticky back plastic is not sellotape - it's a sort of adhesive vinyl, usually coloured or patterned, used to cover things quickly. Like plastic wallpaper :)

(Anybody who has ever watched Blue Peter should know this...)

+1
Level 77
Jun 8, 2016
If you had watched Blue Peter you would know that they do in fact *erroneously* refer to Sellotape as sticky-backed plastic. It annoyed the hell out of me.
+1
Level 79
Nov 27, 2015
I thought Winnebago had pretty much been replaced by RV. And Jeep has became a wide-selling consumer brand of SUV. Nobody in my area calls any other brand a Jeep. There are 4 x 4's, SUVs, ATVs etc. but no one calls their 4WD Dodge Ram, Hummer, or F-150 a Jeep. It's generic only when referring to military vehicles, at least in my area of the mid-south US.
+1
Level 58
Nov 27, 2015
Possibly the quiz is for people who've been alive for more than a decade or two. It may have become more correct or fashionable lately to refer to 4x4s by those other terms, but for many decades after WW2 they were all Jeeps, whether or not they were built by Willys. Same goes for the RV. The point of the quiz is to please those people who know they're called RVs nowadays, but who remember back a while when, no matter who built them, they would be called Winnebagoes. In the UK the Robin Williams movie "RV" had to be given the subtitle "Runaway Vacation" because we don't know what RVs are!
+1
Level 79
Nov 27, 2015
I suspect I'm of the same generation as you. I was screaming in front of the TV when the Beatles first appeared on Ed Sullivan. I knew the answers, I'm just saying that a couple of these are no longer used, at least in my neck of the woods. And I don't think we ever used Hoover as a verb. We always vacuumed. Still a fun quiz, though.
+1
Level 58
Nov 27, 2015
We don't really have the acetominaphen one in the UK. I think to be fair to other people around the world you should accept "aspirin" because that is also a brand name for more or less the same product. May I also suggest changing the clue "Recreational Vehicle" to "motor home", which is recognizable on both sides of the Atlantic.
+1
Level 41
Jun 16, 2016
No, in the UK you call it Paracetamol, just like us Aussies. Aspirin is acetylsalicylic acid, different again.
+2
Level 48
Nov 27, 2015
As you said, some of them only apply in certain countries. How about creating some quizzes as a series, such as international trademarks, American, British, Canadian, Australian, etc.?
+1
Level 75
Nov 27, 2015
All these years I had no idea there was a vacuum hiding in my thermos.
+1
Level 79
Nov 29, 2015
Yeah, I'm stumped on that one, too.
+1
Level 77
Sep 25, 2017
I seem to remember doing an entire dull Physics lesson about the mechanics of a Thermos flask. That's how I knew.
+1
Level 67
Jan 8, 2019
There is a black hole in there..
+1
Level 59
Nov 28, 2015
I haven't heard of most of these. But more importantly, no Pampers? It was the first thing that came to my mind when reading the title.
+1
Level 79
Nov 29, 2015
How exactly is a Thermos a vacuum-sealed beverage holder? Do people suck all of the air out and then put the cap on really fast?
+1
Level 67
Jun 7, 2016
my thoughts exactly. The vacuum sealed part really threw me off
+3
Level 70
Dec 13, 2016
The layer between the inner bottle and the outer shell is where the vacuum is. Vacuum is a better insulator than any other common insulation.
+1
Level 67
Mar 3, 2020
that makes sense, thank you
+1
Level 4
Nov 29, 2015
I really like this quiz, some were hard but that is what makes it fun, nice job!
+1
Level 38
Dec 4, 2015
OOH NICE
+1
Level 48
Feb 23, 2016
Good quiz :) Like the idea
+2
Level 75
Apr 22, 2016
Please add Lypsyl for lip balm?
+1
Level 76
Jun 15, 2016
I can't believe I missed Speedo. I had to wear one of those for years as a kid on the swim team.
+2
Level 49
Aug 19, 2017
Anyone outside the US is doomed to 50% :(
+2
Level 68
Feb 4, 2018
Coming from Germany, this is difficult. I know lip balm as "Labello" and tissues as "Tempo" for example
+1
Level 47
Feb 22, 2018
Literally who says half of this stuff
+2
Level 76
Mar 12, 2018
Almost everyone where I'm from. It might just be a regional thing, but in the NorthEast US, almost all of these are everyday terms. Yesterday I went to the story to get Q-tips, Kleenex, and Clorox. Then I asked my daughter if she packed her Thermos today. No joke.
+1
Level 44
Mar 1, 2018
I never realized that Thermos was a brand. I thought the actual name for the thing was a thermos.
+1
Level 55
Jan 8, 2019
Great idea but I only got 2. And you know the one. This is only for USA and I am in Europe.
+1
Level 67
Jan 8, 2019
Im from europe and got 16/24. I guess it depends how easily you absorb "knowledge" and the amount of exposure to it by tv, books, internet. But yes it is a 99% american quiz. But in my opinion still doable (enough words you atleast COULD have heard of outside of the us, either because of more widespread use, or it is use SO much that you could hardly miss it if you have ever seen /read american stuff) As opposed to some questioms in some quiz where there really is no way of knowing
+1
Level 67
Jan 8, 2019
I only see the caveat now haha,, that's cute. Well unless it is said with malice/contempt etc
+1
Level 67
Jan 8, 2019
Curious which two though,, since there are a few internationals on there. Google, frisbee, walkman, postit. And kleenex and vaseline are brands in a lot of countries. I believe thats all of them, ow yea, jeep. The others I merely got from exposure. (Assimilate, resistance is futile, apparently, massbrainwashing lol)
+1
Level 67
Jan 8, 2019
Got 16/24 rollerblades crossed my mind but was certain it wasnt a brand. Didnt think thermos was a brand either, allways thought it was a lazy way for americans to say thermoscan lol (as it is know here). Band-aid i, do know, but could only come up with hansaplast and leukoplast. Never heard of winebago in my life, and not sure about tylenol (pretty sure I havent) and astro turf, (might have, but must ve piled it in the same category as surf and turf, a weird saying nothing to do with what we call turf, what you call peat)
+1
Level 67
Jan 8, 2019
Ow and never heardheard of clorox (but we have chlorix here but never use it as a generic name, we use the term chloor though, but that is the same word as chlorine is for you). And jumbotron, sounds like magnetron (microwave) but a big one haha
+1
Level 59
Aug 31, 2019
As a brit, giving the names for what i call everything:

artificial turf - astro turf

adhesive bandage - plaster

bleach - bleach

lip balm - lip balm

flying disc - frisbee

web search - google

4-wheel drive - 4x4 (4 by 4 verbally)

gelatin dessert - jelly

stadium sized tv - big screen?

facial tissues - tissues

elevator music - no word

sticky notes - post-its

cotton swabs - cotton buds

vacuum-sealed beverage holder - flask

inline skates - rollerblades

clear tape - sellotape

swim briefs - speedo/trunks

stun gun - taser

acetaminophen - paracetemol (had to google that)

petroleum jelly - vaseline

vacuum cleaner - hoover/vacuum cleaner

recreational vehicle - i have no idea what this is

photocopier - photocopier

portable tape player - no word for this.

i got 9/24.

+1
Level 78
Mar 3, 2020
Also a Brit and muzak, thermos and walkman are (or were) all used here. A recreational vehicle is a motorhome, like a bigger version of a campervan. Knew that one from the movie Space Balls! Got 22. Heard of Tylenol and Clorox but didn't know what they were exactly.
+1
Level 68
Mar 3, 2020
13/24. I guess it is good for someone from UK
+1
Level 69
Aug 23, 2020
The Thermos clue is oddly worded. Possibly using the description "insulated" in lieu of vacuum-sealed might bring the percentage up quite a bit.