Take another quiz >

U.S. States or European Countries by GDP

Guess the U.S. states and European countries with the largest economies.
2018 estimates according to the World Bank and Wikipedia
For European countries, only includes the GDP within Europe
GDP at current exchange rates, not PPP
Quiz by Quizmaster
Rate:
Last updated: July 25, 2019
First submittedDecember 27, 2016
Times taken19,720
Rating4.96
4:00
Enter answer here
0
 / 20 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
GDP
Country or State
$ 4.00 tn
Germany
$ 3.08 tn
California
$ 2.83 tn
United Kingdom
$ 2.78 tn
France
$ 2.07 tn
Italy
$ 1.82 tn
Texas
$ 1.70 tn
New York
GDP
Country or State
$ 1.43 tn
Spain
$ 1.28 tn
Russia
$ 1.06 tn
Florida
$ 0.913 tn
Netherlands
$ 0.880 tn
Illinois
$ 0.803 tn
Pennsylvania
$ 0.706 tn
Switzerland
GDP
Country or State
$ 0.689 tn
Ohio
$ 0.635 tn
New Jersey
$ 0.602 tn
Georgia
$ 0.586 tn
Poland
$ 0.577 tn
Washington
$ 0.576 tn
Massachusetts
+5
level 80
Jan 3, 2017
A good challenge. Had the final one left and was hard not knowing if it was a state or country. Finally figured it out though.
+1
level 73
Apr 25, 2017
Exactly my thoughts
+4
level 50
Apr 24, 2017
Really puts the size and strength of the U.S. economy into perspective. Even the more unassuming states have larger economies than the vast majority of European countries. New Jersey is particularly incredible given its size.
+5
level 59
Apr 24, 2017
The economies of the USA and the EU are roughly the same size.
+3
level 77
Apr 24, 2017
yes. Useful to remember when some nitwit complains about there being more questions on the site about California than Moldova.
+11
level 50
Apr 24, 2017
We're kind of talking apples and oranges here. You're comparing sovereign countries with their own highly unique cultural identities and laws to partially sovereign subdivisions (states) with little differences in culture and law. There are going to be many more obstacles to conducting economic activities between people/entities in Germany and France than in Ohio and Florida.
+5
level 46
Apr 24, 2017
@SargassoSam To some extent you are correct, but I would like to point out that cultures between states can vary by a fair amount. Perhaps not to the same extent of different countries but there is quite a difference between New York and Georgia or Texas and California.
+3
level 71
Apr 24, 2017
To expand on nypackerfan's point, not only are there different cultures from state to state but also different laws. There are federal laws, yes, but states have their own as well.
+8
level 50
Apr 25, 2017
@nypackerfan, Obviously there are regional differences, but American culture is still pretty homogeneous throughout all states. Ethnic differences at home aside, no matter which state you were born and raised in, everyone speaks the same language, is exposed to the same media, shops at the same stores, eats similar cuisine, receives similar education, and obeys similar laws. Urbanization and the internet has increased that homogeneity even further. States may add their own flavor, but the differences between states are mostly trivial compared to the differences between European countries. It's what makes America so unique for a country of its size and population--whether you're in New York, Texas, or California, life isn't going to be much different at the end of the day unless you're somewhere in the sticks.
+5
level 77
Apr 25, 2017
Speak of the devil. As if the states of California or New York or Virginia or Massachusetts don't have their own extremely rich culture and history. And as if there is not a greater difference in culture between, say, Louisiana and Washington, or Alaksa and Hawaii, than there is between Serbia and Croatia. World traveler here speaking with some authority, the entire bleeding *world* is largely homogeneous now. Sovereignty doesn't stop the Internet, television, Hollywood, fashion, or corporate McDonaldization from making inroads. Language? You'll have find more communication hurdles exist between residents of Miami and Honolulu, or Boston and the Atchafalaya Basin, than between those of Zurich and Berlin, or Naples and San Marino. Cuisine? Everywhere from Turkey to Poland and all places inbetween and some elsewhere you'll find doner kebab or shawarma, "toast," pizza etc etc. There are as much differences in cuisine between New England and New Mexico as between Russia and Spain.
+3
level 77
Apr 25, 2017
and all of that is not to diminish that there are significant differences between some European countries, just that it's incredibly silly to hear people complain that they should be expected to know anything about the USA, and bend over backward to justify or exonerate their ignorance, while at the same time getting upset that others might not know about "sovereign states" as if sovereignty = significance, when there are five sovereign European countries smaller than Rhode Island, and about 20 with GDPs smaller than New Jersey, and yet I'm sure if you suggested to any random European that Tuvalu was just as significant as France because they were equally sovereign you would get scoffed at.
+4
level 76
Apr 24, 2017
New Jersey has quite a few people though, bigger population than Switzerland.
+1
level 50
Apr 24, 2017
No doubt, but still very impressive considering the land area. To put things into perspective, NJ has roughly 40% of the land area of Slovenia, yet well over 10X the total GDP! (579B vs 43B)
+2
level 64
Apr 24, 2017
Alright... Here we go. There are fewer European countries than there are US states. Plus, Western Europe is more advanced than Eastern Europe. Once the Slavic and Baltic states become fully developed Western countries, Europe's economy will increase rapidly. the residual effects of Soviet occupation.
+10
level 77
Apr 24, 2017
uh huh sure. And what about when Arkansas and Mississippi become fully developed?
+3
level 54
Apr 24, 2017
Im pretty sure the baltic states are more developed than the rest of eastern europe
+3
level 49
Apr 24, 2017
Estonia is decently developed, but Latvia and Lithuania are very much like the other Eastern European ratholes unfortunately. And to be honest, even Estonia is just primus of the class for kids with special needs.
+3
level 77
Apr 25, 2017
I just spent about two years traveling through and living in Eastern Europe. It's not that bad. There are some very impoverished areas, but the major cities are nicer than you might expect. Estonia is indeed very nice. Vilnius and Riga were both pretty, albeit boring. Even Pristina was much nicer than I was expecting, and Chisinau was okay.
+1
level 64
Apr 25, 2017
In response to all of these; I'm talking about upwards of ten countries, you mentioned two states. Can't directly be compared. Yes, the Baltic states are more developed than most other former Soviet satellites, but they're still not up to the standard of regions like West Germany and England. Hungary, Czechia, Poland and Romania are all experiencing a boom in their economy, far greater than most Western countries, so the GDP of that region is increasing by several per cent every year.
+2
level 77
Oct 19, 2017
If you like I can list 10 states instead of 2. It's not as if there are only 2 states in the south or the midwest.
+1
level 53
Nov 7, 2019
Ridiculous, there are 50 states in the US. The United States has a number of small prosperous regions in a huge desert of nothingness: https://i1.wp.com/metrocosm.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/usa-gdp-cartogram.gif
+1
level 63
Apr 24, 2017
5 stars!
+1
level 61
Apr 24, 2017
There should be a way to make a distinction between European country of Georgia and American state of the same name (in English). The answer should probably state something like "Georgia (US)" or something similar.
+3
level 67
Apr 24, 2017
Georgia isn't usually considered to be in Europe, although on the cusp, it is usually considered to be in Asia.
+1
level 51
Apr 24, 2017
Well, gentlemen, I don't think we can argue with that one. Bravo, PatCovino, bravo.
+4
level 58
Apr 24, 2017
I don't think ANYONE is guessing that the nation of Georgia has one of the largest GDPs in Europe OR Asia, so it seems pretty unnecessary for this quiz.
+2
level 80
Apr 24, 2017
For JetPunk purposes, the country of Georgia is in Asia.
+1
level 62
Apr 24, 2017
Enjoyed that.
+1
level 49
Apr 24, 2017
I got them all with 1 second left!
+1
level 58
Apr 24, 2017
This was a great quiz!
+1
level 62
Apr 24, 2017
I did not think I would get 100%
+1
level 41
Oct 12, 2017
New Jersey over Belgium? And are you sure Russia isn't number 1.
+1
level 38
Dec 1, 2017
Russia is NOT above Germany. The richest countries are 1.USA 2.China 3.Japan 4.Germany. And belgium is a tiny Country, what did you expect?
+1
level 59
Nov 16, 2017
North Carolina? Wow, more people live there than I thought...
+1
level ∞
Jul 25, 2019
North Carolina just misses the list now, having been passed by Washington and Massachusetts.
+1
level 32
Apr 5, 2018
got it on first try. I'm glad that there is a lot of time hahaha
+1
level 41
Mar 6, 2019
I wrote Switzerland, correct spelling, it didn´t count.
+4
level ∞
Jul 25, 2019
Only way that's possible is if your computer is broken!
+1
level 74
Jul 25, 2019
It's happened to me multiple times. I even copy and paste what I typed in the answer box to the comment section many times, perfect spelling by me and the answer results. I do not know why those glitches occur.
+1
level 46
Jul 26, 2019
I wish we would start using GNP figures for these quizzes. In an increasingly globalised world GDP is increasingly unreliable in demonstrating the wealth and power of countries. It is possible for a nation to see much of the value of what it produces disappear into foreign companies and tax havens.
+1
level 72
Jul 27, 2019
Would be interesting to see a PPP version of this quiz. I think PPP is a more accurate measure of the standard of living enjoyed by a country.
+1
level 74
Jul 28, 2019
I don't think standard of living matters so much at this level. Like for example it matters more when talking about average salary or poverty levels, but kind of useless to compare if Jeff Bezos or Carlos Slim can buy more burritos.
+1
level 69
Nov 7, 2019
When I got down to the last two, I got hung up on trying countries when answers turned out to be states (Georgia, Washington). Hooray for peaches, pecans, peanuts, carpet, apples, timber and technology.
+1
level 29
Nov 7, 2019
Imagine if the "states" were not "united" and were all individual countries ... interesting thought!
+1
level 55
Nov 7, 2019
Alright, we get it, you're rich...
+2
level 59
Nov 7, 2019
Please start accepting more spellings for Massachusetts, in all quizzes. I always miss which letters are doubled.
+1
level 39
Nov 9, 2019
In March 2019 the Netherlands surpassed the 1 trillion mark. Could you make change?