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Words Containing Animals #1

The blanks in these words are all animals. Based on the definitions, guess the animal.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedJanuary 22, 2013
Last updatedJanuary 22, 2013
Times taken31,419
Rating4.07
4:00
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Hint
Answer
Center of a target
Bullseye
The one who gets blamed
Scapegoat
An aerial battle
Dogfight
Fashion runway
Catwalk
An American football
Pigskin
Roughhousing
Horseplay
To best in a battle of wits
Outfox
To skip ahead of
Leapfrog
Trick or prank
Monkeyshine
To nag constantly
Henpeck
Hint
Answer
To make into a hero
Lionize
Backpack that holds water
Camelback
Unintelligent person
Birdbrain
Bitter herb used in absinthe
Wormwood
Prying device
Crowbar
To cross the street illegally
Jaywalk
Nook in a desk for holding papers
Pigeonhole
To find fault in unimportant details
Nitpick
Photography enthusiast
Shutterbug
Unruly lock of hair
Cowlick
+1
level 20
Jan 31, 2013
Good quiz. How about "bull dog clip"? XD!
+1
level 72
Jan 31, 2013
How does DODO brain sound?
+2
level 70
Aug 3, 2015
or fleabrain?
+1
level 54
Jan 31, 2013
Never even heard of monkeyshine... I think pigeonhole might be more localized - where I grew up near Seattle, we called that a cubbyhole...
+2
level 52
Jan 31, 2013
We call it "cubbyhole" too, and I live in Indiana. I spent a bit of time trying to figure out what kind of animal a cubby was before I realized that wasn't the right answer.
+1
level 61
Aug 4, 2015
Ha! I was born in Indiana and grew up in Seattle, and I typed "cubby" twice because I figured that had to be it.
+1
level 55
Apr 27, 2015
Same here and I grew up, well, Anywhere, USA.
+1
level 60
Aug 2, 2015
Definitely an animal - anyone who plays NL baseball for Chicago.
+2
level 67
Aug 2, 2015
When I was a kid my Irish mother used 'Cubby Hole' for a space in the wall between a set of drawers and a linen cupboard that the cat used to sleep in. That's the only time I've heard it. Pigeon hole was used for any set of little partitioned boxes such as those for keys at a hotel desk.
+1
level 77
Aug 2, 2015
Don't recall hearing "monkeyshine," either. Knew the rest.
+1
level 76
Aug 2, 2015
I heard monkeyshines quite a bit when I was a kid in the '50s and '60s, but I haven't heard the term in years. It was usually in the context of, "If you don't stop those monkeyshines you are gonna get it!"
+1
level 67
Feb 14, 2017
must be regional, never heard that ever.
+1
level 38
Jun 4, 2016
Here in New Zealand we call it a pigeon hole although our true meaning of it is somewhere you hand in late homework. You go into the staff room (What you Americans know as a 'faculty room') and put your overdue homework in that respective teacher's pigeon hole
+1
level 77
Mar 11, 2017
In the United States the only way I've heard the term "pigeonhole" used is as a verb, meaning to put something into an overly restrictive category, to categorize in a limiting way, to assume and minimize, to typecast.
I was exposed to a definition more similar to what's on the quiz only when working overseas for a company staffed mostly by Brits and that's what they called out staff mailboxes.
+1
level 33
Jan 31, 2013
How about shutterfly?
+1
level 71
Jan 28, 2014
That's all I thought of as well. There's even a company named Shutterfly.
+1
level 61
Aug 28, 2019
I tried shuttercock..(maybe confusing shutterstock with shuttlecock when trying to get shutterbug?)
+1
level 22
Feb 1, 2013
'Pigeonhole' must be British then, seems like none of the american people use the word. In England we use it instead of 'cubbyhole'. But I have no idea what Jaywalking is...
+1
level 76
Aug 25, 2014
I'm American and I've heard of pigeonhole all my life, but I'm older. Maybe it's a generational thing.
+1
level 44
Nov 8, 2014
I'm American and relatively young (i'm 20) and ive heard it. The only one i never heard was monkeyshine
+1
level 80
Dec 27, 2014
I know the word, but the meaning I've learned is more akin to "categorize or classify someone or something, often in a misleading or incorrect manner". Never heard it refer to a place for papers.
+1
level 76
Aug 2, 2015
This is the best explanation I found for the origin of the word. http://askville.amazon.com/word-pigeonhole-originate-reason/AnswerViewer.do?requestId=10944260 In medieval times pigeons were kept for meat, and their cotes were often attached to the houses. A small opening in the wall made it possible to feed and water them or grab one for dinner. In the 1700s desks were made with small compartments which had doors resembling the openings to the earlier pigeon "holes" in the wall, and they came to be known as pigeonholes. It became a verb in the mid-1800s meaning to classify or compartmentalize something.
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level 66
Jan 8, 2016
To me, the most common use of pigeonhole is definitely the metaphorical use "to narrowly categorize." I think they key aspect of a person feeling pigeonholed is the rigidness and narrowness of the categorization, not necessarily that it is inaccurate. While I can certainly see how cubbyholes in a desk look like a literal pigeonhole, I have never heard that usage personally. I'm from the northwest of the US.
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level 35
Feb 1, 2013
Lionize is to treat someone as important or as a celebrity, but has nothing ot do with a hero.
+1
level 55
Apr 27, 2015
"Hero" can have different meanings.
+2
level 43
Feb 2, 2013
we use both pigeonhole and jaywalking in australia.
+1
level 24
Nov 28, 2013
Never come across Lionize before, good quiz!
+1
level 44
Jul 23, 2014
We use pigeonhole and cubbyhole in Canada
+1
level 44
Mar 29, 2018
We don't in Ottawa.
+1
level 66
Aug 8, 2014
To me, pigeonhole is when you are forced into one specific line of work or something like that. I use cubbyhole for desk drawers. Regional stuff, I'm sure. Got the answer right, just adding my take. Great quiz, QM! Love the site!!! :D
+1
level 77
Oct 29, 2014
Exactly what I was thinking. I have only heard it used in the context of being stuck in a certain profession or only viewed as a certain way due to past experience. Also I am pretty sure that a CamelBak (no 'C') is a brand name of hydrating backpack. It is synonymous similar to Kleenex or Q-Tip though so it makes sense.
+1
level 59
Aug 2, 2015
I knew about 5 and with typing common animals I got another 10. 15 beats the average so it worked rather well. Good quiz nonetheless!
+1
level 72
Aug 2, 2015
Doing this quiz just now, this occurred to me for the first time: Why "dogfight" since dogs don't fly?
+1
level 44
Mar 29, 2018
I've heard that it was because to save fuel, engines would be turned off for very brief periods, and this sounded similar to a dog panting
+1
level 61
Aug 28, 2019
I thought it was because they were dogging. Like tracking down the enemy (like hunting dogs). So chasing eachother and twisting turning trying to outmanoeuvre eachother
+1
level 50
Aug 27, 2015
Pigeonhole as in to put people in a category or stereotype them is the more common use of the word today, however when the term was coined in the 1840's it was used to describe a small cubbyhole in a desk. Likely, it morphed from the cubbyhole itself to the verb meaning to stick something in the hole and then to categorizing someone. The average number of words native English speaker use is estimated at 20,000 to 30,000 but, there are over 1,025,109 words in the language (and growing) so we shouldn't expect to know them all.
+1
level 57
Nov 5, 2015
Can you accept "@ss" instead of "pigeon"?
+1
level 69
Sep 19, 2016
Monkeyshine... that is a new one. Trying to work out where it might come from - the monkey bit makes enough sense, but why 'shine'? Odd.
+1
level 61
Aug 28, 2019
The first thing I thought when I saw that (or maybe the second time because I think I thought it when reading the comments and not the answers. Was (monkey)shenanigans. Everytime the word was mentioned in the comments I couldnt help but "hearing"that.

And ofcourse it makes you think of moonshine.

+1
level 57
Aug 22, 2017
never heard the terms "monkeyshine," "henpeck," or "camelback" in my life. ever. also, i've never heard the term "pigeonhole" used for the description given. i've only heard it used to describe the act of unfairly categorizing someone in some way.
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level 30
Feb 11, 2019
When you guess “ bird “ for an aerial fight and get a completely different answer :)
+1
level 53
Apr 11, 2019
You should allow donkeybrain as an acceptable answer as Frank Reynold's was officially tested for the condition in a Pennsylvania mental hospital.