Germanic languages in Europe

Write down all the Germanic languages official spoken at home in the European countries
Quiz by RudiOhrenstein
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Last updated: October 5, 2014
First submittedSeptember 17, 2014
Times taken789
Rating4.40
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Native Speaker
Language
5,500,000
Danish
22,200,000
Dutch
67,000,000
English
91,000,000
German
330,000
Icelandic
5,100,000
Norwegian
9,000,000
Swedish
+2
Level 70
Sep 18, 2014
What about Faroese and Luxembourgish? Also, some linguists say that actually there's two Norwegian languages, Nynorsk and Bokmål.
+1
Level 27
Sep 18, 2014
Yes, they are the two Norwegian written languages. There are a lot more different dialects, so "Norwegian" is hardly a language itself. Commonly it refers to bokmål though
+1
Level 82
Sep 18, 2014
Swedish, Danish and Norwegian are all more or less the same though. There are Finnish dialects that differ more from each other than Swedish and Norwegian for example. It's all political anyway, something that was born with spread of media and the birth of the nation state. Which is why I don't think there's any reason to start to split hairs about which "languages" are included and which aren't. --- Faroese is not an official language of a European country.
+1
Level 78
Sep 19, 2014
Frisian the closest language to English is a minority language in the Netherlands and Germany.
+1
Level 52
Apr 9, 2018
Luxembourgish is official in Luxembourg.
+1
Level 37
May 5, 2018
Typed in Icelandic as a last resort. (Felt that all remaining languages were either Latin or Cyrillic) and was surprised to find that it was right.
+1
Level 60
Aug 15, 2019
I agree that Faroese isn’t an official language of a country but Luxembourgish and Swiss German should be included