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Countries by Wealth per Capita

Name the countries that have a mean household wealth per adult of at least $220,000.
For 2019 according to Credit Suisse
Includes cash, real estate, investments, etc...
No data for the Vatican, Andorra, Monaco, Liechtenstein, or San Marino
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: November 4, 2019
First submittedJanuary 3, 2017
Times taken21,916
Rating4.54
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$ / Adult
Country
564,653
Switzerland
432,365
United States
386,058
Australia
380,868
Iceland
358,003
Luxembourg
304,124
New Zealand
297,873
Singapore
$ / Adult
Country
294,255
Canada
284,022
Denmark
280,049
United Kingdom
279,077
Netherlands
276,121
France
274,919
Austria
$ / Adult
Country
272,310
Ireland
267,348
Norway
265,260
Sweden
246,135
Belgium
238,104
Japan
234,139
Italy
+5
level ∞
Jan 3, 2017
Among these countries, Australia and New Zealand have increased the most since 2000. Gotta love that housing boom.
+5
level 40
May 8, 2017
Yeah, Gotta 'Love' the Housing Boom... Ugh...
+2
level 71
May 9, 2017
Depends when you bought in; although people in Perth may not agree now
+2
level 73
Nov 5, 2019
Indeed it is mostly housing values. My house has doubled in value since I bought it.
+1
level 63
Jan 30, 2020
Same. Lucky me.
+1
level 73
Jan 3, 2017
Had them all but the top two...then I looked at the name of the source material. Still missed Iceland though.
+1
level 83
Jan 8, 2017
Iceland was a surprise considering the massive drop of the ISK with the bank crisis in 2008. They value of the currency is still down from what it was, against the USD the value is about half of what it was. So either they were really rich or wtf? Also.. if I read that source material right (skimmed) the data for Switzerland is from 1997? Maybe I mistook that. That's a while ago too.
+2
level 68
Jan 9, 2017
What about the Vatican, awful lot of money gets siphoned to that area.
+8
level 62
Jan 15, 2017
please read the quiz notes
+2
level 62
Apr 25, 2017
I'm sure the only reason Canada is so high on the list is from housing expenses. A small house in Vancouver will go for CAD $1,000,000.
+2
level 62
Apr 25, 2017
I wouldn't be surprised, honestly. I live just outside of Vancouver and I feel like I'm going to live with my parents forever :/ Either that or I'll live in an apartment with like 2-3 other people.
+2
level 57
Apr 25, 2017
Several other cities have comparable (maybe worse) problems, for instance London or Barcelona.
+2
level 62
Nov 5, 2019
I live in a smaller Canadian city and house prices are still ridiculous. I think I'll buy a tent instead!
+2
level 76
Nov 6, 2019
There's a difference between expensive and unaffordable. In London and Barcelona wages are more commensurate with costs of living. Not so in a city like Vancouver, where some employers have difficulty finding and retaining staff since many workers can no longer afford to live there.
+1
level 69
Jan 30, 2020
@redsplat: the facts do not support your thesis. The average wages in Canada are higher than in London or Barcelona (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_average_wage)
+1
level 44
Feb 2, 2020
Now try a 3rd world country, where houses cost three times less... and people earn seven times less.
+1
level 33
Apr 25, 2017
Go Italy!
+2
level 78
Apr 26, 2017
Also, Switzerland... and this goes for many other countries on the list... I don't think a country really gets to claim it is "wealthy" so long as they're going to charge for ketchup at McDonald's. I would say that that is some ghetto-ass 3rd world bullcrap... but... they don't even try to pull that sh*t in the Philippines or Thailand or India or Ethiopia (and in Ethiopia it's not even a true McDonald's just a cheap knock-off)... so... I don't actually know what that is. But it's stingy and low.
+19
level ∞
Nov 4, 2019
You don't get rich by handing out free ketchup.
+3
level 75
Nov 4, 2019
I have a similar complaint about hiding taxes you have to pay when advertising stuff in the USA. As if they're optional ...
+1
level 76
Nov 5, 2019
This is the most ghetto complaint I've seen in a while. Well played.
+1
level 42
Apr 27, 2017
very interesting, 1:38 on the clock
+2
level 60
Nov 27, 2017
Something is totally off with this quizz. Or with its source. Otherwise I am one of the dirt poor americans...
+5
level ∞
Nov 4, 2019
Mean != median. For example, let's say Bill Gates visits a homeless shelter. The mean wealth in that homeless shelter could be over $1 billion even though everyone but Bill Gates is poor.
+3
level 66
Jan 30, 2020
Yes, while the mean for the US is $432K, the median is only $66K. Switzerland, on the other hand, has a much more even distribution of wealth, with a mean of $565K and a median of $228K.
+3
level 58
Jan 30, 2020
Is there a similar quiz that uses median wealth?
+1
level ∞
Nov 4, 2019
Also consider that someone who bought a house in California in 1990 would probably have over 500k in home equity by now.
+1
level 60
Nov 6, 2019
Unless it burnt down of course.
+2
level 49
Jan 30, 2020
The quiz is made up of either countries where everyone has a relatively large amount of money, or countries where there are quite a few (or very few sometimes) extremely wealthy people that skew the figures. Unfortunately, most of these fall into the latter category.
+1
level 80
Nov 4, 2019
So, San Marino is poorer than Italy overall? Seems not likely.
+1
level 62
Nov 5, 2019
Microstates are almost never present in these kinds of quizzes, because the data isn't avaliable.
+2
level 80
Nov 5, 2019
According to the source, yes. San Marino clocks in at $218,321, just barely missing the cutoff for the quiz.
+2
level 80
Nov 5, 2019
Actually, scratch that. It looks like $218,321 is just a dummy value they're using when they don't have good data. The exact same figure is given for Andorra, Liechtenstein, etc.
+3
level 65
Jan 30, 2020
Someone didnt read the instructions?! ... Seems very likely.. ;)
+2
level 66
Nov 4, 2019
Nearly all of western Europe, minus Spain and Portugal. That does not surprise me; but no Germany, that surprises me.
+3
level 67
Nov 5, 2019
Compared to the rest of Europe, very few people in Germany own real estate. It's very common to just rent an apartment.
+4
level 65
Nov 5, 2019
From the source: "Germany and Sweden remain below this level, probably reflecting generous state provision of pensions and healthcare, which reduces the incentive for individuals to save for their retirement needs." It should be added that employees have to directly transfer a significant part of their income to finance these security systems, instead of "sav[ing a significant part of their income] for their retirement needs". It is actually strange that these "state fonds" are not considered for the wealth calculation.
+2
level ∞
Nov 7, 2019
Neither Germany nor Sweden has a sovereign wealth fund with substantial assets. Why would we consider future government spending an asset? If anything we should subtract the value of the government debt.
+2
level 70
Nov 4, 2019
Surprised not to see Qatar or Kuwait
+3
level 57
Jan 30, 2020
They'd probably be there if this were limited to citizens instead of households.
+1
level 69
Nov 7, 2019
Andorra should be included in the caveat at the beginning. There's no data, but based on the housing prices and the number of inhabitants, I'm sure it would be in the list.
+1
level ∞
Nov 7, 2019
Okay
+1
level 43
Jan 16, 2020
Dang, Iceland :(
+1
level 59
Jan 30, 2020
I tried every country excepted via the quiz notes before I noticed the quiz notes. Quite surprised that none of the small Persian Gulf nations make the list.
+1
level 22
Jan 30, 2020
No I am wondering why China does not count
+1
level 60
Feb 1, 2020
Because it is not amongst the 19 countries with the highest mean wealth per capita. Duh
+1
level 60
Feb 1, 2020
Surprised Germany isn't here.
+1
level 30
Feb 18, 2020
Me too. Germany is the fourth biggest economy in the world. But, I suppose that since the population is so high, it fizzles out when taken per capita. Remember that East Germany was a poor country until the 1990', as well.