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German Inventions

Based on the clues, name these German inventions and discoveries.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedMay 10, 2014
Last updatedJanuary 22, 2017
Times taken20,217
Rating3.72
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Clue
Answer
Karl Benz's invention
Automobile
Workers of the world, unite!
Communism
Closest relatives of Homo sapiens
Neanderthals
Addictive derivative of coca leaves
Cocaine
Place to grow bacteria
Petri Dish
Place to store your 5 year old
Kindergarten
Branch of mathematics simultaneously
invented by Newton and Leibniz
Calculus
Addictive pain relief medication
Morphine
The furthest planet in the solar system
Neptune
Polka instrument with bellows
Accordion
Clue
Answer
Way to see inside the body
X-Ray
Tannenbaum
Christmas Tree
Springtime holiday mascot
Easter Bunny
Fahrenheit's invention
Thermometer
Rigid dirigible
Zeppelin
Pain reliever synthesized by Bayer
Aspirin
Ursine candy
Gummy Bear
Hovering aircraft
Helicopter
Magnetic way to record sound
Tape Recorder
Einstein's theory of space-time
Relativity
+2
level 73
May 12, 2014
How about Cassette Player for Tape Recorder? Or was the German invention the device that you put on a table to record conversations in boardrooms or prison interrogations? If that is the case, the clue is really misleading since CDs were never really used for that purpose.
+2
level ∞
May 12, 2014
Germans didn't invent cassette tapes, just magnetic tape as a way to record sound. I fixed the clue .
+3
level 80
Jul 16, 2014
I eventually got it, but "audio tape" seems like a reasonable answer to accept.
+2
level 71
Jul 20, 2019
I’m with the lemur on this one: I immediately put “audiotape”. When they invented the tape recorder, they would have had to have simultaneously invent audiotape too, or it would have been a pretty useless invention, no? On the other hand, I immediately and logically was about to try “tape recording”, and then was surprised when it just took “tape”…🤷🏻‍♀️
+4
level 36
May 20, 2014
Can you accept Oven/ Cupboard/ Closet etc. for 5 year old? I was trying different answers for ages..
+2
level 58
Jun 3, 2014
Kindergarten is more school than a place to "store" a 5 year old. A daycare is a place to store a 5 year old. I think Kindergarten is an educational requirement. A daycare is more where you drop them off and someone takes care of them, which is more in line with the word "store". Maybe reword the clue to "A school for 5 year olds" or something.
+3
level 28
Jun 5, 2014
Do not store living things anywhere if you do so they tend to becom non-living, especially if you forget to make airholes.
+4
level 53
Jul 14, 2014
It's a joke! Geez!
+2
level 64
Jun 9, 2015
Yeah, really.
+1
level 70
May 1, 2017
So a non-helpful, somewhat misleading clue is okay as long as it's intention was to get yucks?
+1
level 68
Aug 10, 2019
In Germany, a Kindergarten actually is "where you drop them off and someone takes care of them," and it's for ages 3 through 5, sometimes 6. Some education is often involved (not always), but no actual schooling. It's not the Germans' fault that the Americans use the word slightly differently.
+1
level 67
Jun 3, 2014
Was the helicopter not invented by Igor Sikorsky, a Russian?
+1
level 46
May 19, 2017
It WAS invented by Igor Sikorsky, a Russian, in America. No idea how Germany factors into this at all...
+1
level 46
Jun 16, 2018
Nope it WASNT invented by him. Helicopter existed long before WW2.There had been helicopters in the 19th century but they couldnt fly for a long time. The first helicopters to see the production line were the fa223 and the fl 282 and later the sirkorsky r-4
+1
level 68
Jun 3, 2014
It's spelled Tannenbaum - which, strictly speaking, means fir tree. Christmas tree would be Weihnachtsbaum! And it may be wrong to say the Christmas tree was invented by Germans. More likely, it was invented IN Germany by foreign monks who used the pagan tree of life symbolically to help make conversion to Christianity more palatable to the heathens ;-)
+1
level ∞
Jun 3, 2014
Fixed the spelling
+1
level 69
Jun 3, 2014
Isn't Uranus the furthest planet?
+1
level 68
Jun 3, 2014
Um, no.
+4
level 72
Jun 3, 2014
It's the closest black hole though.
+1
level 68
Oct 28, 2014
No, but Pluto is.
+1
level 57
Jun 3, 2014
Deutsch ist sehr sexy.
+1
level 58
Jun 5, 2014
I'm not American or German, consequently "Tannenbaum" as a clue meant absolutely nothing to me. You might want to put a more generally meaningful clue for that one.
+1
level 76
Nov 24, 2015
I'm not American or German either but I knew Tannenbaum, probably from "O Tannenbaum", the German version of "O Christmas Tree".
+1
level 63
Aug 8, 2018
I am American and had no clue what a Tannenbaum is. All I could think of was Wes Anderson and red track suits. Sometimes you just don't know stuff.
+1
level 61
Jun 11, 2014
Shouldn't the clue read "Device which records sound magenitcally," or something similar? The clue as it reads now suggests a method, not a device.
+1
level 28
Jun 13, 2014
I have discovered that I can't spell anything
+2
level 56
May 2, 2017
You seemed to do alright in that sentence...! ;-)
+1
level 52
Oct 7, 2018
it's easy....A-N-Y-T-H-I-N-G......
+1
level 46
Jun 24, 2015
I tried theory of relativity and it didn't work. Just to let you know.
+1
level 71
Nov 19, 2015
The Easter Bunny isn't associated with spring where I come from
+1
level 77
May 1, 2017
The clue just says that Easter is a "springtime holiday", which it is...
+2
level 63
May 1, 2017
Unless you're from Australia, or New Zealand, or anywhere south of the equator, in which case it really is not.
+1
level 77
May 1, 2017
Well, Christianity is a mediterranean thing. Nobody knew about Australia or even the southern hemisphere when Easter was created.
+1
level 63
Aug 8, 2018
Australia and New Zealand may have been terra incognita to Europeans in the 4th century but the Earth being spherical in shape was known centuries before that.
+1
level 65
May 1, 2017
Röntgen Rays, please.
+3
level 56
May 2, 2017
That's not what they're called in English - hardly anyone would have a clue what you were referring to if you did call them that.
+1
level 61
Sep 6, 2019
I cant be bothered to look it up, but i have a suspicion that in non english speaking countries (or countries that have a strong english connection like india) more people would have something similar to röntgen than x-rays

ok i actually did go and look it up now. Of all the european languages, only 5 other languages use x-ray to describe the radiation type. So you are definitely wrong.

btw the english wiki article say x-rays, or röntgen rays. So not only would many people from other countries get what you mean, it is actually correct in english aswell.

+1
level 54
May 1, 2017
Better clue for kindergarten would be appreciated; it's distinguished from creches and other settings because of its educational nature. Also for Christmas Tree; why use a limited cultural reference (I think that's what it is?) that doesn't even actually refer to Christmas trees? Perhaps something else could be found for Easter Bunny; "springtime" doesn't do that great for anyone at the poles, at the equator or in the southern hemisphere without some mental calculation. "Ursine" for gummy bear also seems rather contrived, given the difficulty is in the description rather than in the answer, which doesn't seem the point.
+1
level 67
May 1, 2017
Accept different spellings of the drug names, like Morfin and Asprin?
+1
level 77
May 1, 2017
Maybe you can accept "Easter rabbit"?
+1
level 55
Jun 16, 2018
Yes please
+1
level 79
May 1, 2017
I kept trying things like honey for 'ursine candy'. My brain was thinking candy FOR a bear, not candy shaped like a bear!
+1
level 67
May 1, 2017
The Germans just narrowly missed out on inventing leprechauns or St Patrick.
+2
level 70
May 1, 2017
Printing Press? It is THE most important German invention in my opinion
+1
level 67
May 1, 2017
(Being picky) I understand that only Neanderthals were discovered in Germany, but the modern consensus is that Denisovans are as closely related to modern humans as they are (believed to be sister species). However, the clue implies that Neanderthals are out closest relatives in their own right. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denisovan
+4
level 78
May 1, 2017
Back in my day, we had NINE planets....
+3
level 45
May 3, 2017
Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit was born in Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and spent most of his life in the Dutch Republic. Classifying his inventions as "German" is ridiculous.
+1
level 47
May 3, 2017
Printing Press?
+1
level 42
Jun 4, 2017
Could you add more spellings of Zeppelin? I spelled it "zepplin" and got it wrong.
+1
level 45
Jun 16, 2018
That's the correct way to spell it.
+1
level 74
Aug 1, 2017
Heroin is a better answer for the Bayer question than aspirin, might want to make it more specific.
+1
level 45
Jun 16, 2018
What about Easter rabbit? Isn't it the same?
+1
level 60
Jun 16, 2018
Place to store your 5 year old: CLOSET
+1
level 79
Jun 28, 2018
The exclusion of the printing press is a bit odd. To quote Wiki, "the invention and global spread of the printing press was one of the most influential events in the second millennium." Maybe QM didn't include it because movable-type printing was invented in China centuries earlier?
+1
level 40
Oct 6, 2018
A large number of these were not invented in Germany or by Germans, while some of the answers are not even "inventions" or "discoveries." It was still easy to get 100% on the first try.
+1
level 43
Aug 4, 2019
Please accept "neaderthal" for "neaderthals"!