Double G Vocabulary Words

Based on the definitions, guess these words that contain GG.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: September 26, 2015
First submittedMarch 29, 2011
Times taken22,939
Rating3.97
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 / 22 guessed
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Definition
Word
Group of geese
Gaggle
To argue over prices
Haggle
Jamaican musical genre
Reggae
Whipped, in the British Navy
Flogged
Holiday beverage made with
eggs and nutmeg
Eggnog
To walk with a cocky, swaying motion
Swagger
Terraced pyramid of ancient Mesopotamian
Ziggurat
Independent online journalist
Blogger
Floating beam that supports a canoe
Outrigger
Northerner who migrated to the South
during Reconstruction
Carpetbagger
Protective eyewear
Goggles
Definition
Word
Larva of a fly
Maggot
Hot and humid
Muggy
Unstoppable force
Juggernaut
Knife made as a weapon
Dagger
The notes of a chord, played in
series rather than at once
Arpeggio
Slang for one's head
Noggin
Small chunk of gold or chicken
Nugget
To import illegally
Smuggle
Long sled without runners
Toboggan
British slang for "had sex"
Shagged
British slang for "kissed"
or "made out"
Snogged
+3
Level 72
Jul 16, 2013
Grrr... I knew Arpeggio...but I couldn't get Archepellego out of my head. Crap.
+1
Level 54
Aug 16, 2013
It's that "j" sound that really messes you up, isn't it?
+3
Level 78
Aug 19, 2013
Can't believe this site passed up on the opportunity to include "muggle." ;-)
+4
Level 50
Jul 30, 2014
I know, isn't it wonderful?
+1
Level 78
Aug 12, 2014
Only missed toboggan. I could see it in my mind, but the word just wouldn't connect to my fingers.
+1
Level 78
Apr 17, 2016
Got 'em all this time with 3:26 left. Much better.
+9
Level 46
Aug 5, 2015
I only got shagged from a funny story one of my teachers told me once. The shag was an extremely popular dance in the '70s and early 80s here in the US, and back then my teacher (long before she was my teacher) lived in Australia for a year during high school. One time at a social gathering a couple of her Aussie friends casually asked her what she liked to do for fun and she said, "Well, my boyfriend and I love to shag. In fact we've taught several lessons back home!" As you can imagine, everyone in the room got quiet and stared at her :)
+1
Level 78
Apr 17, 2016
I'm sure the Alabama song, "Dancin', Shaggin' on the Boulevard" left people wondering, too. :)
+1
Level 53
Apr 18, 2016
lol Thanks for sharing. Gave me a good laugh.
+1
Level 71
Oct 13, 2019
I didn’t realize that one could get shagged from a funny story...
+1
Level 62
Apr 3, 2020
And of course the bird, similar to a cormorant I believe, which goes by the same name as the sex act and the dance. https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/wildlife-guides/bird-a-z/cormorants-and-shags/
+1
Level 48
Apr 18, 2016
What! No Snoop D-O-double-G? I really expected that to be one of the answers.
+1
Level 78
Sep 13, 2017
Thankfully, it wasn't.
+2
Level 66
Apr 20, 2016
should the clue for Ziggurat read 'Terraced pyramid of ancient Mesopotamia' (as in without the n) or 'Ancient Mesopotamian terraced pyramid.' it doesn't make sense at the moment.
+1
Level 77
Nov 9, 2017
Mesopotamian should be without N
+1
Level 71
Apr 20, 2016
I confused snogged and shagged. Hmmm. That could explain the all the trouble I had in pubs...
+3
Level 72
Sep 21, 2017
You show a picture of geese in flight, in which case the group noun is "Skein". It's only a gaggle when the geese are on the ground. Sorry, just being pedantic.
+1
Level 80
Sep 23, 2017
Protective eyewear? The googles do nothing!
+1
Level 71
May 28, 2018
Loved the clue for nugget! Lol!
+1
Level 64
May 28, 2018
Shouldn't 'Mesopotamian' be 'Mesopotamia'?
+1
Level 81
Jun 6, 2018
Thank you Austin Powers and Harry Potter, for teaching me British slang.
+1
Level 43
Jun 4, 2019
I had 4 minutes to come up with juggernaut and failed. In hindsight, it's a bad definition. A powerful, overwhelming force, yes, but not unstoppable.
+1
Level 62
Apr 3, 2020
When I grew up a large lorry was a juggernaut. I suppose the reason it was called it escaped me for answering this quiz, sigh. And it is a good reason they weren't really juggernauts as even big lorries do need to be stoppable to be a) safe and b) useful.