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Mediterranean Foods

Based on the descriptions, name these popular foods (and beverages) from the Mediterranean and Middle East.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedMay 26, 2014
Last updatedMay 26, 2014
Times taken6,468
Rating3.37
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Description
Answer
Deep-fried chickpea ball
Falafel
Flatbread that sometimes has pockets
Pita
Dairy product with bacteria cultures
Yogurt
Sauce made from the above,
plus cucumbers
Tzatziki
"Delightful" gel-like confection
Turkish Delight
Type of cheese used in Greek salad
Feta
Dip made from chickpeas and tahini
Hummus
Sweet, pitted fruit of palm trees
Dates
These leaves are often stuffed
and served as an appetizer
Grape Leaves
Dish made of bulgar, parsley,
tomatoes, mint, and onion
Tabouli
Description
Answer
Anise-flavored spirit of Greece
Ouzo
White wine made with pine resin
Retsina
Popular oil
Olive Oil
Squid
Calamari
Spit-roasted meat
Doner Kebab /
Gyro / Shawarma
Filo pastry filled with spinach
Spanakopita
Eggplant-based dip
Baba Ganoush
Abundant freshwater fish
also called "St. Peter's Fish"
Tilapia
Semolina dish of North Africa
Couscous
Dessert with layers of filo,
nuts, and honey
Baklava
+1
level 49
May 29, 2014
I thought a gyro was the sandwich made from that meat. I don't know where I got it in my head that the meat was souvlaki....
+1
level 66
Jun 7, 2014
I'm pretty sure you're correct especially when I looked it up on the internet. Different types of meat can be used to make a gyro, but meat is just one part.
+1
level 68
Feb 18, 2019
I guess gyro and souvlaki can be used to mean different things, especially outside Greece, although there are differences within Greece as well (Being from Thessaloniki, I never quite figured out how Athenians place an order in a gyro shop!). However, I think the general understanding is that at least the meat itself is called gyros.
+1
level 75
Jun 7, 2014
Tried baba ganouj, baba ghanoush, couldn't get it. Need more leniency in the spelling.
+1
level 45
Jun 7, 2014
Oh, my, how could you say that yoghurt is Mediterranean/Middle Eastern? Perhaps you have not heard of lactobacillus bulgaricus. Here is a link: http://www.bacillusbulgaricus.com/lactobacillus-bulgaricus. And do try my Bulgarian cuisine quiz. I demand you change the description.
+1
level 66
Jun 7, 2014
OMG, another Bulgarian on this site! I can't believe that! :D And although I completely agree with you, unfortunately for the bigger part of the world the yoghurt and the white cheese (not feta) are Greek. :/
+2
level 71
Jun 7, 2014
Yogurt itself is a Turkish word. Which culture (no pun intended) discovered how to make it is unknown, but a good bet would be the Turkic peoples who brought yogurt with them to Anatolia. While the scientific name for the culture refers to Bulgaria, that is because a Bulgarian scientist identified it. No reason not to take pride in that, but that does not change the fact that yogurt is a part of Mediterranean and Near Eastern cuisine. It may also be part of Bulgarian cuisine; the two are not mutually exclusive.
+1
level 31
Jun 10, 2014
If you are a PAOK fan i accept the coment, otherwise please let us know some famous brands of bulgarian yogurt and feta. Thanks
+2
level 44
Jun 7, 2014
All I can think of when I hear baba ganoush is how every episode of "MXC" seemed to have a contestant with that name.
+3
level 48
Jun 7, 2014
I think vine leaves should be acceptable for grape leaves, most restaurants I've been to or worked in have stuffed vine leaves on the menu not grape leaves.
+1
level 38
Jun 7, 2014
I agree!
+1
level 75
Jan 18, 2016
Yes, vine leaves should be accepted!
+1
level 65
Apr 16, 2016
Agreed - that's what they serve in Greece (dolmades)
+1
level 67
Oct 23, 2016
Yes, I've only heard them called vine leaves
+2
level 60
Mar 29, 2017
I know them as wine leaves. As a direct translation from my mother language.
+1
level 71
Jun 30, 2018
Yes, I tried vine leaves
+2
level 29
Jun 7, 2014
Too Eastern Mediterranean oriented, where are the Spanish or Italian dishes?
+1
level 81
Jun 8, 2014
Bulgur is a more common spelling for the wheat product.
+1
level 66
Nov 5, 2018
Yeah, I'd hope the dish doesn't contain any Bulgars.
+1
level 55
Jun 12, 2014
I hate hummus.
+1
level 72
Jul 27, 2014
Please accept Vine Leaves
+1
level 28
Nov 5, 2014
agree
+2
level 72
Aug 19, 2014
Tabbouli, tabbouli, tabbouli! (The food that's hard to get) Tabbouli, tabbouli, tabbouli! (But we will eat it yet)
+1
level 44
Jan 9, 2015
I'd say grape leaf is more commonly known as vine leaf
+1
level 75
Jan 18, 2016
Macedonian feta is delicious as well. Very similar to the type eaten in Iran. Less salty and more moist than Greek feta (I haven't tried Bulgarian feta...).
+1
level 71
Jul 9, 2016
I too have never heard of a grape leaf but have often eaten one or more stuffed vine leaves.
+1
level 57
Mar 27, 2017
Got 14. Totally drew a blank on baklava. For grape leaves I tried(as did a few people it seems) vine leaves. And feta I spelled with two t's, but obviously I'm the only one who thought this.
+1
level 69
Mar 20, 2018
Just going to add to others saying vine leaves (and possibly dolmades) should be accepted for the leaf clue. Certainly I've never heard the term grape leaf, but often heard vine leaf.
+1
level 67
May 31, 2019
Got stuck on borek for spanakopita. Pretty similar.
+1
level 54
Aug 19, 2019
Name of the quiz: "Mediterranean Foods" Quiz: *ignores half of the Mediterranean* Jesus Christ, do Americans REALLY not know where the Mediterranean is? Pizza, born in Naples, and Paella, in València, are just as much 'MEDITERRANEAN'. I can't believe how uncultured you have to be in order to call Mediterranean this mix of Arabic, Levantine, Turkish and Balkan food you've tossed in here