Word Chain - France

Guess these words related to France. The last letter of each word is the same as the first letter of the next word.
All the answers are a single word, but can be hyphenated
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: July 20, 2017
First submittedJuly 18, 2017
Times taken25,644
Rating4.35
5:00
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Hint
Answer
Capital of France
Paris
Country on France's eastern border
Switzerland
Fashion designer: Christian ____
Dior
Paris theatre famous for can-can
dancing: Moulin _____
Rouge
French word for water
Eau
D-day beach named for a U.S. state
Utah
Muslim head covering banned
in public schools
Hijab
Tallest mountain in France: Mont _____
Blanc
President of France: 1995–2007
Chirac
Crescent-shaped pastry
Croissant
High speed train (three letters)
TGV
Hint
Answer
One of the deadliest battles of WWI
Verdun
Frenchman who conquered
most of Europe
Napoleon
"Pleasant" city on the Riviera
Nice
Snail in French cuisine
Escargot
Largest island in French Polynesia
Tahiti
International police organization
based in Lyon
Interpol
Painter: Henri de Toulouse-________
Lautrec
French word for five
Cinq
French-speaking province of Canada
Quebec
French word often followed by "d'etat"
Coup
+13
Level 82
Jul 18, 2017
Plenty of time left at the end to try every letter between T and V to get TGV.
+10
Level 81
Jul 18, 2017
Train à grand vitesse. Literally.
+22
Level 73
Jul 18, 2017
yep...love it. Hey Jacques...what should we call zis train, eh? Dunno...what about "really fast train?" I love eet...let's abbreviate eet so eet sounds more impressive...hon hon hon...

French accents are hard to type...

+9
Level 64
Aug 29, 2017
It worked. I started reading it with a French Accent from Jacques on.
+3
Level 25
Jun 19, 2018
Train à grande vitesse. Don't forget the "e" ;)
+1
Level 48
Jan 18, 2021
To be fair the British were hardly more inspired. Our (comparatively rubbish) equivalent was called the HST... er, High Speed Train. And they made a fancy one with advanced technology which they called the... Advanced Passenger Train. Clearly no-one had any sense of poetry in the early '70s
+1
Level 83
Sep 12, 2018
It's still pretty well known. Why bother randomly plug in answers? You're testing yourself, not trying to cheat a little for a grade in school.
+8
Level 70
Jul 18, 2017
Never heard of Lautrec. The rest were fairly get-able but I would have had as much of guessing his name if the question was in Cantonese.
+4
Level 73
Jul 18, 2017
He's the can-can dancer guy. I guarantee you have seen his paintings before.
+1
Level 52
Oct 22, 2018
As a child he broke both legs, and they did not heal properly. As a result, his legs ceased to grow, so that as an adult he was extremely short (1.42 m or 4 ft 8 in). He developed an adult-sized torso, while retaining his child-sized legs
+2
Level 68
Oct 13, 2020
Fun facts: He was about 4'11'', but he was particularly well-endowed. So, he was known as 'Le trépied' (the tripod) and such was his priapism, he was also known as 'La Théière' (the teapot) by many of the working girls. He was permanently 'ready', shall we say!
+1
Level 54
Jul 20, 2017
It's Mont Blanc, not Mount Blanc
+1
Level ∞
Jul 20, 2017
Rookie mistake. Now fixed.
+1
Level 62
Jul 20, 2017
I don't think Napoleon conquered 'most' of Europe - at least not in the sense of more than half of it. Europe is quite big.
+1
Level 37
Jul 20, 2017
Remember that we're talking about 19th Century Europe here.
+3
Level 59
Oct 30, 2017
He never conquered Northern Europe, the European part of the Ottoman Empire, most of European Russia, Portugal and of course the British Isles. I think it's fair to say Napoleon didn't conquer more than half of Europe. Nonetheless, all the places he did conquer (or held indirect power over) made up an empire comparable to the Roman Empire.
+7
Level 79
Oct 30, 2017
it hasn't grown physically in the last 200 years.
+5
Level 71
Oct 30, 2017
Which is the same as today's Europe, so...
+1
Level 35
Jun 19, 2020
He conquered portugal
+1
Level 73
Oct 30, 2017
It was only 'comparable' in the sense that you can compare it to the Roman empire to see how much smaller it was...
+3
Level 54
Jul 20, 2017
Chef d'état is said as often as coup d'état in french and should be accepted, although I understand that english speaking persons most likely never heard of it.
+2
Level 62
Jul 20, 2017
but "chef d'état" is not a french word used in english.

"Coup" is ...

+3
Level 62
Oct 30, 2017
Oh... And I really though, this quiz would be about French, not English?! But now I understand, why I had no idea, what this last question was about.....
+1
Level 69
Oct 30, 2017
In word chain quizzes, the last letter of the last word is always the same is the first letter of the first word, so 'chef' is not an option.
+1
Level 21
Feb 18, 2018
I didn't know this rule, which isn't written, and also tried "conseil d'état", "chef d'état" ... Maybe the Quizzmaster can mention it ?
+2
Level 67
Aug 16, 2019
It is mentioned in the comments of nearly all these chainquizes (all the 40+ I ve done so far anyway) so after the first one, you will know it for the others. If you read the comments that is.
+1
Level 41
Jan 18, 2021
I agree. It is what I had initially put in as well.
+4
Level 74
Jul 25, 2017
Why is there a question about a Canadian province in a quiz about France? French is a language, France is a country.
+4
Level 78
Jan 2, 2018
Quebec did used to be owned by France though.
+5
Level 83
Sep 12, 2018
English never did used to employ double past tenses.
+3
Level 78
Apr 16, 2019
^ As an L1 speaker of contemporary English I think I am allowed to use it, if it comes naturally.
+1
Level 71
Jan 18, 2021
Irregardless, you should try to use proper English here.
+1
Level 63
Jan 22, 2021
"proper English". "Irregardless". Ok.
+6
Level 70
Aug 30, 2018
Yes, but the quiz is about things related to France. A former French colony that still speaks French is certainly related to France.
+4
Level 67
Aug 16, 2019
The didnt start to speak french in canada just for the fun of it. Like "Hey I'm bored. I know what we can do, what if we all started speaking another language. Ok how about russian? Nah something more fancy sounding. Ok what about French? Mangifique!!"
+1
Level 62
Jan 18, 2021
That would be awesome, though.
+1
Level 69
Oct 30, 2017
So few people know about Verdun. Maybe in part because they also didn't get TGV, but still...
+3
Level 53
Dec 14, 2017
There were a lote of brutal WWI battles, so it would be hard to pinpoint one without the first or last letter.
+1
Level 83
Sep 12, 2018
Ypres, Somme and Verdun were the major bloodbath battles. Ypres is in Belgium.
+1
Level 71
Dec 4, 2018
Kept typing verdennes, verden, vieran, etc. Jeez
+2
Level 73
Oct 30, 2017
pas trop difficile, 100% de toute façon. vive la france !
+2
Level 72
Nov 11, 2018
D'accord, mon vieux.
+2
Level 71
Oct 30, 2017
Just a minor niggle, Napoleon wasn't French, he was Italian, he was born in Corsica which was part of one of the Italian states at the time - his birth surname was Buonaparte...
+7
Level 82
Oct 31, 2017
As I said about another quiz, Napoleon was born a few months after Corsica was conquered by France. You're wrong.
+1
Level 48
Jan 18, 2021
From what I read off the all-knowing and inerrant Wikipedia, Corsica didn't actually become part of France until 1789, 20 years after Napoleon was born. Until that point it was simply an occupied territory. So saying he was born in France sounds a bit like saying that someone born in Paris in 1941 was German.

Presumably I'm wrong but maybe someone can explain why

+3
Level 37
Jan 23, 2018
To Markasol: And your point is? Hitler was born in Austria, yet he ruled Germany. Stalin was born in Georgia, yet he ruled the USSR. Corsica became part of France; Austria (during Hitler's reign) became part of Germany and Georgia became part of the USSR.
+3
Level 62
Jan 18, 2021
I enjoy nit-picking as much as anyone else on this page, but that's got to be some sort of record. Also, as Arp mentions, it's just plain wrong.
+1
Level 39
Jan 21, 2021
I don't think Napoleon would really have appreciated being called italian
+1
Level 60
Nov 12, 2017
too much time. Even a slow person like me had 2 minutes left
+1
Level 52
Aug 19, 2019
A lot of french words ends with "d'état" (crise, conseiller, ennemi...)

I'ts better if you say that it ends with "de grâce"

+1
Level 62
Jan 18, 2021
An de grâce, période de grâce, jour de grâce... all fairly common expressions in French! You could make the same argument here.
+1
Level 65
Jan 18, 2021
quizmaster should at least have written that the answer is used in english as well
+1
Level 72
Jan 18, 2021
I got all of them except the French painter!!
+1
Level 65
Jan 18, 2021
the "followed by d'état" clue is a bit strange as many other words can be followed by d'état altough they don't meet the letter requirement. (ministre, chef, visite, ennemi, etc.). It's quite commun in French.

at least you should write that the answer is used in english as well.

+3
Level 65
Jan 18, 2021
Escargot literally means snail in French, it's not limited to cuisine.
+2
Level 27
Jan 18, 2021
Now, It is LGV in France (Ligne à Grande Vitesse)
+1
Level 58
Jan 18, 2021
For some reason, I read 'city' on France's eastern border and had no idea. Now I feel dumb.
+1
Level 55
Jan 18, 2021
1:09

Ok I'm French so I suppose it helped me a little...

+2
Level 11
Jan 21, 2021
Why is there a specific question on Hijab being band, like only muslim clothes are ban?

When ALL religious clothes and items are forbidden in French school, since we considered that school is a place to learn not a place to exposed your opignion. So religious and political items are not allowed.

+1
Level 46
Jan 21, 2021
This is technically true, but it seems that the current law was ushered in specifically around a controversy about Islamic headscarves. As written, it bans "ostentatious" symbols of any religion but no one felt the need to ban crosses over a certain size before the headscarf controversy.

I think it's a little disingenuous to say that the controversy around headscarves in schools or veils in public is about something other than Muslim women wearing hijab.

That said, I think there's an ongoing good-faith effort to resolve religious freedom in France and try to preserve la laicité at the same time, with no easy answers. There is a lot of nuance to this subject that is not well-captured in English-language media and references, so I have to say I also don't really love the question and the way in lends itself to stereotypes about France.