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Vocabulary Words Ending in Silent T

Guess these English words (most of which are also French words) which end in a silent "t".
Quiz by ThirdParty
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First submittedMay 14, 2013
Last updatedMay 23, 2013
Times taken5,346
Rating3.88
4:15
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Definition
Word
Snail meat
Escargot
A stereotypically French hat
Beret
A method of fabric-making,
similar to knitting, using a hook
Crochet
A type of Swiss mountain cottage
Chalet
A person employed to park cars
Valet
A type of choreographed dancing,
supposed to be very graceful
Ballet
A fleshy, boneless cut of meat
from an animal's loins or ribs
Fillet
A person who appreciates fine food
Gourmet
Having the respect of others
(e.g. a valued brand name)
Cachet
A relationship involving
mutual understanding
Rapport
A nickname
Sobriquet
Definition
Word
An arranged bunch of flowers
Bouquet
A lawn game where balls are struck
with mallets and driven through wickets
Croquet
A type of playing card used for fortune-telling
Tarot
The reestablishment of good relations
(e.g. between two countries)
Rapprochement
The final part of a play,
in which the plotlines are resolved
Denouement
A dark blue wine grape used in Bordeaux
Merlot
A method of serving meals where
diners get up and serve themselves
Buffet
The first public appearance of a person or show
Debut
A place for storing large amounts of equipment
Depot
A type of entertainment where
the audience sit at tables and eat
Cabaret
+1
level 71
May 14, 2013
And perhaps entrepĂ´t would also be acceptable for a place for warehousing goods.
+1
level 49
May 14, 2013
Okay, I've added that as an alternate answer for "depot".
+1
level 77
Jun 18, 2013
couldn't spell denouement. But I learned that word watching The Tick.
+2
level 78
Jun 21, 2013
I always pronounce the final t of fillet - have I been wrong all these years?
+3
level 49
Jun 23, 2013
Well, obviously every word on the list was pronounced with a /t/ at some point in its history, or it wouldn't be spelled with one; so pronouncing the "t" is more archaic than wrong. That's especially true of older words like "valet" and "fillet", which were borrowed from French before French acquired its modern pronunciation. (Also, many of these are regional. In England, with its long history of warfare with France, it's much more common to pronounce the "t"s in French loanwords than it is in America.)
+1
level 77
Oct 18, 2014
Well, every word in the list comes from French, it was rather funny ^^. We do not pronounce those "t"s in modern french, indeed.
+2
level 72
Jun 24, 2014
The silent-t version is "filet", as in Filet Mignon. In "fillet" you pronounce the T.
+1
level 49
Jun 24, 2014
The quiz accepts both spellings. (As for "fillet", if you pronounce the "t" in America then people will think you're ignorant, whereas if you fail to pronounce it in England then people will think you're putting on airs. The "r" in "foyer" works the same way, except in reverse. Isn't it lovely to be separated by a common tongue?)
+2
level 63
May 29, 2015
I'm like you, Jerry, if I read "fillet" I will pronounce the t at the end, if it's "filet" I do not. I'm not sure I've come across the word fillet in the US (north east if that makes a difference?) but it was not uncommon to hear it in the UK, particularly in relation to fish. I'm English, albeit a filthy commoner, from a city whose people are nationally accepted as sounding thick as two short planks, so it could just be the uncultured fools that make up my home city are a special level of, well special, pronouncing the t in fillet :D
+1
level 76
Jun 29, 2015
In mechanics, the term "fillets and rounds" is common. It refers to rounded inside and outside corners/edges. In this usage, the "t" is always pronounced, in the US at least. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fillet_%28mechanics%29
+2
level 72
Nov 28, 2018
FilleTs is the way it was always pronounced in America until the popularity of Filet O' Fish from MacDonald's, which should more accurately be described as a filleT of fish with that Irish 'O going on.
Hard to believe the hypercorrection snobbery about food arose from a saturated cut of trash fish from Mickey D's.
+1
level 55
Apr 21, 2014
I got rapprochement! :D
+1
level 45
May 9, 2014
Me too :)
+1
level 77
Jun 29, 2018
I somehow knew denouement, but there was no chance I was going to spell it correctly.
+1
level 72
Jul 31, 2019
Well that wraps up the comment section.