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Homonyms Quiz #2

We give you a pair of definitions. You guess the homonym.
Homonyms are words that have the same spelling and pronunciation, but different meanings.
Includes both true and polysemous homonyms
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedNovember 29, 2011
Last updatedAugust 31, 2015
Times taken34,050
Rating4.04
5:00
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Meanings
Answer
Leader
Unit of lettuce
Head
Type of fruit
Romantic meeting
Date
Runner's starting point
Con man's target
Mark
Cooling device
Sports enthusiast
Fan
Seller of stolen goods
To fight with swords
Fence
Frosting
Hockey violation
Icing
To fire
To plunder
Sack
To long for
Type of tree
Pine
Average
Unkind
Mean
Piece of land
To conspire
Plot
Meanings
Answer
Place for art
Theater seating area
Gallery
To mimic
Large primate
Ape
Type of bird
Coward
Chicken
Spy
Tunnel-digging animal
Mole
Unit of time
Duelist's assistant
Second
Certain cattle
To maneuver a vehicle
Steer
Spinning toy
Best
Top
Papal edict
Optimistic investor
Bull
Expensive
Opening to a letter
Dear
Golf area
Inexperienced
Green
+1
level 61
Nov 29, 2011
Dear and expensive? I didn't know "dear" could be used that way.
+1
level 77
Aug 16, 2014
Same. Only one I hadn't heard before.
+1
level 68
Aug 16, 2014
Never heard that term before either.
+1
level 65
Dec 11, 2016
I've only seen "It cost me dearly..."
+1
level 58
Aug 16, 2014
That would be the most common way of saying expensive in Australia, and I imagine it is the same in Britain?
+3
level 48
Aug 18, 2014
I'm in the UK and I use 'dear' quite a lot meaning expensive.
+1
level 33
Jan 18, 2015
I'm American, but I know it since I read tons of historical novels XD
+1
level 62
Nov 27, 2016
Easiest question.
+1
level 59
Jan 13, 2017
I understand it's originally a Scottish word.
+1
level 61
Apr 3, 2019
No it comes from old english and before that a predecessor to the germanic languages. Dutch has duur and german has teuer both meaning expensive.

in the english language it has evolved from from something valuable (to you) to someone that you care for (so still has a high value to you) in some places like american english this new meaning has allmost entirely replaced the old meaning. In other places both are used. (I do believe it is used a lot in scotland the people i ve seen allways say dear instead of expensive)

+1
level 35
Sep 11, 2019
@Sifhraven, you'd probably have more luck in life if you started informative sentences without the word 'No'.
+1
level 76
Feb 18, 2015
I had no problem with that one, although I do watch a lot of BBC shows and read Regency romance novels. Same with sack - knew it immediately.
+1
level 62
May 28, 2016
My nana says it. I think it's British. In French it's the same word as well "cher/e".
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level 43
Nov 27, 2016
I think it's more of a British thing. There's a line in the Beatles' song that goes "Every summer we can rent a cottage on the Isle of Wight, if it's not too dear."
+1
level 65
May 16, 2019
I was always confused by that lyric! Now it makes some sense.
+1
level 43
Jul 22, 2018
I've heard the word dear used before to express how expensive a cost is. "It was quite a dear a price to pay" etc. Maybe not as common in the u.s. , however the Hungarian word for both dear and expensive are the same word. Which by the way is Draga.
+1
level 61
Apr 3, 2019
I actually dont think we have a word for dear in dutch that fits the same spot (not the expensive one, that is duur, where dear originated from /shares origins with).

It would be sweet (lieve) in dear Chris. And someone is dear to me, i guess would become someone is important (belangrijk) to me or means a lot to me (betekend veel voor me) or I care (a lot) for (geef (veel) om)

+1
level 33
Nov 29, 2011
Why was this one tough for me?
+1
level 29
Nov 29, 2011
I sympathise with Ithabise...
+1
level 44
Dec 8, 2011
I say "dear" to mean expensive all the time, that's just what I say... I didn't realise it was odd until some friends pointed out to me that nobody else said it and they only knew what I meant because they were used to me...
+1
level 67
Nov 1, 2016
Dear is the common word for expensive in Britain, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand at least (I don't know about Canada)
+1
level 44
Nov 29, 2016
Not in South Africa. Perhaps you're thinking of the Afrikaans word "duur" which means expensive but not dear. I've never heard dear used in English to mean expensive in this part of the world.
+1
level 56
Apr 13, 2017
it'scommonly used in Canada as well
+1
level 22
Nov 24, 2013
What fun!!
+1
level 50
Jun 21, 2014
What fun!!!
+1
level 66
Jul 20, 2014
What fun?
+1
level 50
Jul 31, 2014
No, noodles, you're supposed to say 'What fun!!!!', adding another exclamation point every time.
+1
level 77
Aug 16, 2014
What, fun?
+1
level 50
Aug 16, 2014
Humph.
+2
level 48
Jun 5, 2014
A little disappointed to discover that a cumquat is not also a romantic meeting.
+1
level 73
Jul 21, 2014
And a tryst is not a fruit. Woe is me
+1
level 77
Aug 16, 2014
Sounds romantic to me.
+1
level 55
Apr 30, 2015
lol
+1
level 66
Jul 30, 2014
Ashamed I missed "pine." :(
+1
level 44
Aug 1, 2014
HOW COULD I NOT GET CHICKEN?! -.-
+1
level 44
Aug 16, 2014
Don't feel bad, that was one of the last ones I got. I think we were both looking for something more obscure.
+1
level 72
Jul 15, 2018
It's just a metaphor of the same word, not two words that are spelled the same coincidentally through separate origins.
+1
level 51
Aug 18, 2014
Should it really considered a homonym when one usage of a word is metaphorical and directly based on the other usage? For example, to "ape" someone means they are acting like an ape in copying them. That's like saying "killed" is a homonym based on "We killed in basketball last night" and "He killed the clerk in cold blood."
+1
level 46
Jul 21, 2015
And that's what polysemous homonyms are. Look at the instructions.
+1
level 61
Apr 3, 2019
Maybe they should add a synonym for polysemous.
+1
level 82
Oct 24, 2014
I am not getting why "to fire" = sack? - The rest are all known to me.
+1
level 75
Jan 6, 2015
That is more common usage in the UK
+1
level 82
Oct 23, 2015
Thanks. Right now I don't get why I ever didn't get that? :D
+1
level 65
Nov 18, 2016
I remember it from reading Harry Potter years ago.
+1
level 63
Nov 27, 2016
Just think of Trump and 'You're fired'. His 'apprentices' are being sacked
+1
level 78
Feb 14, 2019
...apart from the fact that they don't work for him yet, so they can't be fired.
+1
level 43
Sep 4, 2015
i thought it was a good quiz! Thanks.
+1
level 37
Oct 13, 2016
Never heard of the usages of Dear or Sack. But then again. I'm only 11 so I haven't had to much life experience.
+1
level 67
Nov 1, 2016
Looks like you have plenty of money and no job.
+1
level 37
Nov 27, 2016
Instead of "Expensive" for "Dear" something like "Valuable" would make more sense.
+1
level 53
Nov 27, 2016
I've worked in the theatre for almost 40 years. Never heard any part of it referred to as "gallery". Maybe a British term?
+1
level 65
May 23, 2018
Yeah, that one seemed like a stretch to me but I eventually got that one by focusing on the art part. I was typing in things like wall and mezzanine and balcony and whatever else I could think of, I mean you can kind of put art anywhere depending on what it is. The hardest one for me was plunder/fire. Here in America, "sack" is very rarely used to describe anything other then, say, a successful medieval siege. I have heard it in English (UK) language before but took a long time for my brain to find that association.
+1
level 80
Nov 29, 2016
I've never heard of "fence" being used to describe the seller, but rather the verb. "He fenced that car stereo to earn the money" no one would say " He went to seen the fence about the stolen car stereo"
+1
level 65
Mar 2, 2018
In the UK they would.
+1
level 67
Apr 5, 2018
+1
level 49
Jun 8, 2017
Okay, a little British revenge for all those Americentric quizzes.
+1
level 65
May 16, 2019
They already got the War of 1812, I don’t think they deserve much more revenge than that!