English Idioms Quiz #1

Fill the blanks in these English language idioms.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: October 2, 2014
First submittedDecember 18, 2011
Times taken92,302
Rating4.34
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Idiom
Once in a blue moon
All bark and no bite
Barking up the wrong tree
Beat a dead horse
Off the beaten path
Wild goose chase
Pass with flying colors
A sight for sore eyes
Bats in the belfry
Turn over a new leaf
Idiom
Through gritted teeth
Any way, shape, or form
Back to square one
Back to the drawing board
'Til the cows come home
Chip on one's shoulder
Close but no cigar
From rags to riches
Get down to brass tacks
Living high on the hog
Idiom
Burn the candle at both ends
Last, but not least
Saved by the bell
The whole nine yards
Beating around the bush
Between a rock and a hard place
When it rains, it pours
Path of least resistance
The strong, silent type
Put one's best foot forward
+4
Level 51
Dec 18, 2011
Off the beaten path. You should also accept track for that one :)
+2
Level ∞
Dec 18, 2011
Added that answer. Thanks!
+2
Level 54
Oct 19, 2014
Don't know if it is an acceptable answer or not, as I wrote path, but I have also heard "trail."
+2
Level 61
Dec 18, 2011
agree with Savage, being English the first thing that comes to mind is track!!
+1
Level 30
Dec 18, 2011
And here I've only ever heard it as "off the beaten path"! Learn something new every day :)
+2
Level 71
Dec 18, 2011
Yep, it's Track. I've never heard anybody say "off the beaten path".
+2
Level 58
Oct 27, 2014
I've heard path and trail but never track. Just depends where you're from.
+1
Level 50
Jan 30, 2016
I agree
+3
Level 33
Dec 18, 2011
C'mon...'bat in the belfry' should be accepted.
+1
Level 66
Oct 19, 2014
Yes! That's how I know it!
+1
Level 56
Aug 18, 2015
agreed!
+1
Level 56
Mar 2, 2018
Agreed!
+1
Level 57
Dec 18, 2011
Never heard off the beaten track. It's always been path. Probably just a US/UK thing.
+1
Level 67
Mar 22, 2019
Even if it is a uk/us thing i really find it weird that you guys have never heard the other expression. Are all of you so isolated? And dont get any input from outside your country?

meant for both us and uk. Cause if people from other countries have heard from it, how is it that guys stay oblivious from it? Knowing one term doesnt mean you are sheltered from hearing (about) the other

+1
Level 39
Dec 18, 2011
I've always heard path never track.
+1
Level 33
Dec 18, 2011
100% with 2:14 left
+1
Level 81
Jan 11, 2012
We always say 'FLOG a dead horse'
+1
Level 47
Jan 20, 2015
Agreed. That is what we say :-)
+2
Level 50
Jan 29, 2012
Never heard the brass tacks one.
+3
Level 75
Feb 5, 2012
Please accept "bat" in the belfry. Or "a bat".
+1
Level 81
Feb 15, 2012
JusSpammin and Jezilly - the English idiom is "bats in the belfry" - not bat.
+1
Level 46
Mar 4, 2012
I've always said between a rock and a tough spot. I don't know maybe I am just weird...
+1
Level 35
Apr 8, 2012
Ya, flog a dead horse... but not MOOSE for God's sake!
+1
Level 22
Jul 2, 2012
OK, let's get down to brass tax - it's definitely FLOG" a dead horse. "Beat" sounds really silly. I am correct - there are no pipistrelles in my belfry
+1
Level 32
Jan 10, 2020
in america it's only ever "beat a dead horse"
+1
Level 48
Jul 22, 2012
LOL Beat a dead moose? Beat a dead head horse originates from driving a horse (argument) so hard it literally dies. To beat a dead horse is pointless, now to beat a dead moose, well . . . that one needs some explaining. Easy quiz 2:45 never heard 'off the beaten track, I'm U.S based.'
+1
Level 34
Sep 4, 2012
good one, might use this one down at the pub . . never heard of the 2high on the hog" though, but reading the explaination above, must be like "bringing home the bacon"
+1
Level 10
Dec 15, 2012
Huzzah! An English Quiz! Though, you still insist on spelling 'colour' without the 'u'.... Still. Anyway, I've always heard off the beaten 'track'. I've heard 'path' once or twice, but always took it for a misquote. Interesting.
+4
Level 32
Jan 15, 2013
Let's compromise and make it "Off the beaten horse."
+1
Level 28
Mar 1, 2013
I feel stupid I thought it was brass tactics.
+1
Level 72
Mar 7, 2013
Good idea, but really easy. There wasn't the slightest hesitation on any answer. Ok, maybe one or two. 2:34 left
+1
Level 67
Mar 22, 2019
It is not all english speakers on this site. This might be a challenge for other people. Like the quizes days of the week, of count to 10 in this or that language. The people from that language could also say it is way to easy. But what you take for granted might be a (fun) challenge for others
+1
Level 28
May 1, 2013
This quiz was wonderful! I really enjoy this kind, I got them all with 2:50 remaining!
+1
Level 17
Mar 16, 2014
I'm from Indiana, USA, and I have never heard "Bats in the belfry," "Get down to brass tacks," or "The strong, silent type" in my life. Maybe we don't say those ones in the Midwest.
+1
Level 59
Apr 1, 2014
Lotta fun that was! Got 'em all ... and with 2:31 left.
+2
Level 54
Apr 21, 2014
I went for 'close but no banana' - am I the only one? Please accept banana!
+2
Level 78
May 15, 2014
I could only think of banana, too. It's a variation of the cigar phrase.
+2
Level 48
Feb 7, 2016
Banana was the first thing that came to my mind, as a die-hard Garfield fan
+2
Level 48
Apr 2, 2016
I went for "banana" at first, too. I feel like I've definitely heard that more often than I have "cigar," but I've ~read~ the cigar version more often, especially in older books. Maybe the banana version started out as a joking adaptation of the original? I wonder whether it could be slowly rising in favor as cigars grow less common in daily life while people go on eating as many bananas as ever.
+1
Level 62
Nov 15, 2018
not the only one!
+1
Level 71
Oct 19, 2014
Then there was the ophthalmology clinic that advertised itself as a site for sore eyes.
+1
Level 50
Oct 19, 2014
Baby monkeys are all rich. 'Baby monkeys, baby monkeys, riding on a pig, baby monkeys... baby monkeys, baby monkeys, backwards on a pig, baby monkeys...' look it up, seriously, it's HILARIOUS.
+1
Level 55
Oct 19, 2014
I'm British and I've only ever heard of off the beaten track, never path.
+1
Level 70
Oct 19, 2014
Good Quiz As an Australian always heard 'Track' never path ...... we say flog a dead horse and use 'brass tacks'.......... Burn the candle at both ends was a saying long before Roald Dahl was born!
+2
Level 65
Sep 21, 2016
Ditto in NZ.
+1
Level 20
Oct 20, 2014
Close but no cigar is American, it is hardly known in the UK. And I have never heard of 'the whole nine yards' - I suppose that must be American too, maybe from baseball?
+1
Level 52
Jul 13, 2018
During WWII, .50 caliber ammunition belts on American and other Allied fighter planes were 27 feet long - 9 yards. When an enemy fighter "got the whole nine yards," it meant the pilot fired every round at them to shoot them down.
+1
Level 67
Mar 22, 2019
Dont you read or watch tv? Non english speaker here, and have heard that sooo many times. Also surprised someone else had never heard of the strong silent type.
+2
Level 35
Oct 23, 2014
color? seriously? COLOUR
+1
Level 73
Oct 13, 2019
Indeed. I'm certain nobody in England ever used "color" in that idiom.
+1
Level 72
Jan 9, 2015
Too much time. Its really about how fast can you type your answer. 2 minutes would be plenty.
+1
Level 28
Mar 12, 2015
Probably some dialectal differences. I have always heard "It never rains, but it pours" and "Back to the OLD drawing board" rather than the versions used here. Fortunately they were sufficiently similar to be very easy to get. Fun quiz!
+1
Level 60
Jul 24, 2015
Never heard of living high on the hog. Hog is not a word generally used in UK - we say pig. Nor have I heard of close but no cigar - what on earth does that mean?
+1
Level 48
Feb 7, 2016
Close, but not quite
+1
Level 37
May 11, 2018
A cigar is often handed out in celebration of an accomplishment (such as when a baby is born, the father hands out cigars) Therefore, "close but no cigar " means that ...whatever... was almost successful, but not quite.
+1
Level 67
Mar 22, 2019
I keep getting baffled by english speakers not knowing some of these. How can it be that Í dó know them then?? It is not that i watch massive amounts of tv of read tons of books, but a lot of these feel as common as "how is it going" (what is going actually? I guess the same thing as what is "up" haha) I m not sure where i have picked them up. (Not bragging of anything, but i really cant wrap my head around it. Ah there is a nice idiom too. Well actually... it sounds kinda gross and graphic..)
+1
Level 71
Mar 21, 2020
Never heard of 'living high on the hog' (and I'm English)
+1
Level 45
Jul 27, 2015
I say flog a dead horse
+2
Level 63
Jan 29, 2016
Quite hard. I'm confident I know most of these in their German version which is sometimes very different. An example for one I know (beating around the bush): If I'd translate the German version back to English it would be something like "talking around hot mush".
+1
Level 48
Feb 7, 2016
Close but no banana doesn't work?
+1
Level 59
Apr 24, 2020
sounds like you must be from the midwest?
+2
Level 36
Mar 5, 2016
Boy, I feel dumb. All these years, I thought it was "brass tax" instead of "brass tacks." Now I have to completely revamp my imagery of the phrase.
+1
Level 27
May 27, 2016
off the beaten "track" is very Australian
+1
Level 37
Nov 10, 2016
May I suggest that "off the beaten path" might be used by those who first got the idiom from either their bible or religious instructor, while "off the beaten track" is used by the more secular.
+1
Level 50
Mar 6, 2018
Has anyone commented on 'beaten path' vs 'beaten track'? Lately?
+1
Level 31
Mar 7, 2018
It's definitely 'off the beaten track', it's an English saying. The one I missed was high on the hog, never heard of it.
+2
Level 31
Nov 3, 2018
Surely passed with flying colors should be spelt colours (the proper English way)
+1
Level 67
Mar 22, 2019
Didnt know the bats, tacks and hog. Though the first two sounds slightly familiar
+1
Level 47
Mar 21, 2020
"English Idioms" yet you spell colours with no 'u'
+1
Level 59
Apr 24, 2020
Just an FYI, in America if someone said FLOG a dead horse, or really flog anything, it kind of has a sexual undertone. We have a few phrases that we say flog, its jokingly about doing something gross
+1
Level 25
Oct 18, 2020
I take it you never had public floggings in the US then ...
+1
Level 59
Apr 24, 2020
Also, a lot of people on here complaining that it is an "english idiom" quiz but the words aren't "English". That is because this was obviously done by an American. Dont forget, there are WAAAAYYYY more English speaking Americans than in UK. It might not be the same spellings or phrases, but its still the English language.... our nations just developed it differently over time.