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English Idioms Quiz #2

Fill the blanks in these English language idioms.
Last updated: October 02, 2014
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Idiom
Caught red-handed
Every trick in the book
Fiddle while Rome burns
The writing on the wall
Too hot to handle
Too close for comfort
Five-finger discount
On a wing and a prayer
Three sheets to the wind
Will it play in Peoria?
Idiom
Wither on the vine
Tempest in a teapot
Make a mountain out of a molehill
Straw that broke the camel's back
Damn with faint praise
Play devil's advocate
A double whammy
Exception that proves the rule
Mum's the word
Jack of all trades
Idiom
Take with a grain of salt
Reinvent the wheel
School of hard knocks
In one fell swoop
How do you like them apples
More bang for the buck
The boy who cried wolf
By the skin of one's teeth
Treat with kid gloves
Lo and behold
+2
level 44
Feb 16, 2012
I have never heard it referred to as a 'tempest' in a teapot, only ever a 'storm'. If I remember correctly I did poorly in the first idioms quiz, so no wonder I missed 7 in this one...
+1
level 61
Jan 21, 2016
You should read "Anne of Green Gables". There's a whole chapter devoted to "A Tempest in the School Teapot".
+1
level 35
Oct 24, 2016
"Tempest in a teapot" is all I've ever heard...
+1
level 62
Mar 15, 2019
then you've never lived
+1
level 38
Jan 31, 2017
Could you be confusing "Tempest in a teapot" with "Any Port in a Storm"?
+1
level 47
Mar 15, 2019
I've only ever heard 'storm in a teacup'
+1
level 23
Feb 16, 2012
i got the eight easiest ones
+1
level 52
Feb 16, 2012
I've only ever heard 'storm on a teacup' but still managed to get this one, only missed 'how do you like them..' never heard that before. I'm sure I heard my parents use most of these when I was growing up and I, in turn, am passing them onto my kids!
+1
level 42
Feb 16, 2012
Googling "tempest in a teapot" yields 403,000 hits. "Tempest in a teacup" yields 279,000. Personally I've heard the latter, but I've only ever used the former. It has a nicer alliteration anyway.
+1
level 71
Mar 21, 2019
And "Storm in a Teacup" yields 11 700 000 hits so it's fairly obvious which is the more common
+1
level 43
Feb 16, 2012
Would have liked "one ___ swoop" to see how many people thought it was "foul" :)
+1
level 75
Feb 16, 2012
How is it possible to have a storm in a teacup? Does anyone remember the old percolators? Remember how the boiling water would rage inside the pot while the coffee or tea was percolating? That's where the "tempest" is --- in the teapot, not the cup.
+1
level 67
Dec 4, 2014
You don't percolate TEA............ coffee yes, but TEA ......... NO
+1
level 33
Feb 16, 2012
100%
+1
level 70
Feb 17, 2012
Got them all, but had to guess at one: I'd never heard of the five fingered discount... and I'm from New York and I'm 49... sheesh, sounds like something I shoulda hewd a gazillion times, I'm just sayin...
+1
level ∞
Feb 17, 2012
You must have had nice friends growing up!
+1
level 58
Dec 3, 2014
I'm with you. I got it but had never heard of the thing — it was more or less a guess. All the rest were extremely familiar.
+1
level 45
Jun 4, 2015
What does the five finger discount mean- a good or poor discount? I've never heard of this.
+2
level 68
Aug 4, 2015
@cariad, it means to shoplift.
+1
level 28
Feb 18, 2012
Maybe all his friends only had four fingers.
+1
level 39
Jul 17, 2018
...most people only have four fingers on each hand...
+2
level 16
Feb 19, 2012
it's "take with a pinch of salt" not grain
+1
level 43
Jun 6, 2013
I've always heard grain ot salt. Never pinch.
+1
level 42
Feb 23, 2012
No, Scanners, it's from a Latin text that used the phrase "grano salis", which is definitely a grain, not a pinch. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grain_of_salt
+1
level 20
Mar 5, 2012
Lol. I kept thinking of "Too hot to hoot" because it's not an idiom, but a palindromic sentence....
+1
level 50
Dec 4, 2014
Nice!
+1
level 24
Dec 1, 2012
These are not English, they are Americanisms!
+1
level 73
Jan 2, 2014
You are right...not English...they are clearly in Spanish.
+1
level 75
Dec 3, 2014
Mine read in Greek... weird
+1
level 69
Feb 23, 2013
Got all but one with lots of time to spare but could not get, and never heard of, faint praise. Otherwise they were way too commonplace, everyday, easy sayings.
+1
level 72
Mar 15, 2014
Geez, both of these were so easy. Got all of them with over 3 minutes left on both of them. Didn't even had to skip one and come back and think. I don't see how anyone could not know a single one of them. They were phrases I grew up with. Every single one of them. Guess it shows my age.
+1
level 52
Oct 4, 2018
and nationality where the hell is Peoria anyway?? South Africa??
+2
level 33
Apr 25, 2014
"Take with a grain of salt"? I was always led to believe that you take the aforementioned things with a "pinch" of salt.
+1
level 66
Oct 23, 2014
I love reading the comments on these Idioms quizzes. It's interesting to see the dialectical variations of these phrases and it's funny to see people argue about them. :D
+1
level 45
Jun 4, 2015
I love reading the comments too, but if I comment it's not to say my version' s right and another is wrong, but to contribute to how many different versions there are of basically the same idea. Surely there's room for all of our versions?
+1
level 36
Dec 3, 2014
Why do people need to brag about answering all of them, time left, etc? Did you all have friends in school? I thought not. ;)
+2
level 70
Dec 3, 2014
I've always said a pinch rather than a grain of salt
+1
level 52
Dec 6, 2014
These are American idioms, not English
+1
level 67
Jan 26, 2015
I suppose the quiz should be called English Language Idioms, a lot of these sayings originated in the UK and over time some of the sayings in the USA have changed slightly and also some have changed in the UK. Even throughout the UK sayings are slightly different and I'm sure in the USA it is the same. Here in Australia some of these sayings have changed to the USA variety and some have stayed the same as the UK. It's the same in New Zealand and Canada and South Africa for I have lived and worked in all of these countries and sayings like these differ all over the place.
+2
level 45
May 29, 2018
I agree. I assumed it was English Idioms because of the title, and didn't realize that it also included idioms from the rest of the English-Speaking world. So, yeah, English Language Idioms would be a better title.
+1
level 28
Mar 12, 2015
Never heard of five-finger discount or will it play in Peoria. I'm guessing the latter is a U.S. thing?
+1
level 78
Dec 5, 2015
teaKETTLE
+1
level 70
Aug 30, 2016
Googling in inverted commas, "Tempest in a teapot" returns 250,000 results. "Storm in a teacup" returns 2,740,000 results. This suggests to me that, given the vast majority of English speakers are North American this is not just an Atlantic divide. I might also point out the Red Hot Chili Peppers - decidedly not an English band - have a song 'Storm in a Teacup'. I can also find the latter expression used in news media from the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and India as well as the UK.
+1
level 75
Sep 10, 2016
Tempest in a teapot and storm in a teacup both originated in Great Britain, with tempest first seen in print in 1815, and storm first seen in print in 1838. Both were predated many years by storm in a hand-wash basin. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempest_in_a_teapot
+1
level 45
Mar 21, 2019
In the netherlands we have: storm in a glass of water. Not sure if the origin is dutch or english (or another place altogether) i will have to do some digging.
+1
level 70
Sep 23, 2016
Got 'em all in one swell foop! :-)
+1
level 45
Nov 19, 2016
100% with 3:00 remaining. But the two difficult ones (Peoria/Praise) are legitimately hard. Peoria one refers to whether a producer can sell a play on Broadway (or whether it will appeal to the common wo-man). The other one is just obscure.
+1
level 52
Oct 4, 2018
damn with faint praise is one i knew...the Americanisms like Peoria and apples got me
+1
level 70
Aug 1, 2017
so easy
+1
level 19
Jan 23, 2018
I've never heard "take with a grain of salt", only ever "take with a pinch of salt". But great quiz Thanks
+1
level 60
Apr 19, 2018
I swear, I've heard my Dad say every idiom in all these idiom quizzes hundreds of times. Some people just have a love for expressions. I also enjoy idioms turned into malapropisms that I've encountered over the years. For example, My Dad would always say "The $64 dollar question is..." (should be $64,000, like the game show), or , my personal favorite, "Half of one, six dozen of another" (should be six of one, half dozen of another) and I found it endearing.
+1
level 40
Mar 14, 2019
I never heard of a five finger discount before. I grew up in New Jersey. Where do people say this?
+1
level 48
Mar 15, 2019
I've heard it used all my life (in western Canada). I have no idea where it comes from.
+1
level 45
Mar 22, 2019
Got 26 not bad! Funny/interesting/surprising to see that apparently I knew ones that some americans/english actually didnt know. How is that possible. (With difficult/obscure words i could get it, if people only speak with family/friends and i would read difficult material for instance, then it is about words you usually do not get in contact with) well i guess maybe if they never watch tv? Like i ve heard how do you like them apples so often for instance
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