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First Name Vocabulary #1

These words are also common first names. Based on the definition, guess the name.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: December 9, 2016
First submittedNovember 2, 2010
Times taken40,018
Rating3.72
4:00
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Definition
First Name
Jouster's weapon
Lance
Wealthy
Rich
Beam of light
Ray
Small stream
Brook
Mafia boss
Don
Honest. Blunt
Frank
Terse to the point of rudeness
Curt
The night before
Eve
Horny
Randy
To pry open
Jimmy
To walk into water
Wade
Slang for coffee
Joe
Definition
First Name
DNA segment
Gene
Con man's target
Mark or Patsy
Shrub used as an herb in cooking
Rosemary,
Basil, or Sage
High-ranking university administrator
Dean
System of rabbit burrows
Warren
Distilled wine such as Cognac
Brandy
Square of butter
Pat
Prostitute's client
John
The start of a new day
Dawn
Christmas song
Carol
Male cat
Tom
+1
level 45
Oct 3, 2014
Basil is a common name?
+2
level ∞
Dec 9, 2016
It's not uncommon, especially among the older generation.
+2
level 64
Jan 23, 2017
Two fine examples being Basil Fawlty, and Basil the Great Mouse Detective! :D
+1
level 64
Jan 23, 2017
I've met a number of Basils, but never a Sage...
+1
level 47
Jan 23, 2017
I am pretty sure that Sylvester Stallone's son was called Sage. He appeared in Rocky 5
+1
level 51
Jan 23, 2017
Sage Karem
+1
level 76
Jan 23, 2017
I'm showing my age, but Basil Rathbone, the British actor who played Sherlock Holmes (and numerous other roles).
+2
level 80
Jan 23, 2017
The only Basil I can think of is Basil Exposition from Austin Powers.
+3
level 52
Jan 24, 2017
Basil Brush!!!!
+1
level 61
Jun 2, 2018
Sage Steele is a reporter on ESPN.
+1
level 49
Nov 8, 2017
Literally never heard this name
+1
level 67
Aug 23, 2018
+2
level 74
Dec 16, 2018
...and nobody picked up the clue, herb, is actually a more common name than the answers?
+1
level 54
Dec 18, 2018
Basil is apparently not the only option. I went with a feminine herb...
+1
level 63
Aug 12, 2019
I think it is much more common in the uk than the us. When hearing the name I think of the uk.

Sage I feel like is a newfangled thing, like apple but sounding more mysterious.

+1
level 57
Dec 22, 2014
Patsy could also be a con man's target.
+1
level 47
Aug 25, 2016
That's what I thought of too.
+1
level ∞
Dec 9, 2016
Patsy will work now
+2
level 57
Jul 27, 2017
A Patsy is a fall guy.
+1
level 55
Apr 27, 2015
I tried hole, woods, forest...never heard of a warren as being a place rabbits live.
+3
level 58
Sep 6, 2015
You've never heard the real or metaphorical term "a rabbit warren"?
+2
level 61
Nov 19, 2016
Read Watership Down.
+2
level 76
Jan 23, 2017
R.I.P. Richard Adams.
+1
level 67
Mar 18, 2016
Never heard 'Joe' for Coffee and I lived in USA for while, but years ago.
+3
level 71
Dec 13, 2016
"Cuppa Joe". American here; it's definitely a thing.
+1
level 67
Dec 17, 2016
Never heard it before either. Would have been guessing for a long long time before I thought of it.
+2
level 37
Jan 23, 2017
Hard to miss if you live In the USA for a long time
+2
level 51
Jan 23, 2017
even Dunkin Donuts has a "box of joe"
+1
level 76
Jan 23, 2017
Java Joe's = Coffee Coffee's.
+1
level 61
Jan 23, 2017
I know that "joe" is another word for coffee, but I've never heard it used in person.
+2
level 57
Jun 14, 2016
What about Laurel for the shrub used as an herb in cooking? The shrub is called Laurel or Bay Laurel, and its leaves (bay leaves) are used in cooking.
+1
level 62
Oct 27, 2016
At first I thought "Christmas song" meant actual songs so I kept trying Rudolph. Maybe the clue could be phrased "other name for a Christmas song"?
+1
level 71
Dec 9, 2016
I have to say, I'm not even a native speaker yet this clue was immediately clear to me.
+1
level 46
Aug 26, 2017
I don't think it should be changed, but, I will admit... I did try Frosty...
+1
level 76
Dec 10, 2016
I'm on here... It's so annoying being named after a shrub.
+2
level 58
Jan 24, 2017
Ah, yours must be the name everyone thinks mine is. Funny story, though--in college, second day of class, our professor was going around the room trying to see if he remembered everyone's name. When he got to me, he couldn't remember and a classmate of mine I had just met, trying to help him out (and thinking my name was actually your name--assuming you're not a Basil or a Sage) said, "...It goes really well with potatoes!" And our professor, God love him, said, "Oh! I know--Steak!!" So I was Steak for a while...and that's probably not even the weirdest thing I've been called by people who get my name wrong. At least it's entertaining sometimes.
+2
level 76
Dec 11, 2016
In what country is a square of butter a "pat"?
+2
level 83
Dec 13, 2016
I know I've heard the term used in the US, UK, Ireland, Hong Kong and South Africa. Not sure about Australia/New Zealand, but I'd be surprised if the term isn't known there as well.
+1
level 67
Dec 17, 2016
I live in Northern Ireland, so British/Irish depending on your persuasion, i don't remember hearing "pat of butter" in my life.
+1
level 64
Jan 23, 2017
Yeah, nah - Aussie here and I'd never heard of it. I only got it because I was trying Patsy for the con men question.
+5
level 70
Jan 23, 2017
My first thought was "Surely there aren't people in the world called Knob?!"
+1
level 62
Jan 23, 2017
I got pat of butter. From a New Zealander.
+1
level 67
Jan 24, 2017
In South Australia and 'Pat' is used for piece of butter.
+1
level 71
Dec 13, 2016
In the US, the butter-makers' union (possibly just the American Dairy Council) has a tv/radio commercial to encourage the consumption of butter (more like, encourage loving mothers to serve it to their families). They have a slogan, set to a jaunty tune, which I am sure way too many Americans could sing upon request. It goes: "Give 'em all a little pat of butter!"
+1
level 74
Dec 16, 2018
Has, as in if you're posting this 6 years before Windows 95. They still have that?
+1
level 47
Jan 23, 2017
Here in the UK it's also known as a knob of butter. Unfortunately, I don't anyone called Knob.
+3
level 51
Jan 23, 2017
no, but knob is a euphemism for what I've called many people...
+1
level 53
Jan 23, 2017
I know Nob or Nobby is a name e.g. Nobby Stiles (footballer) short for Norbert. Not very common I know but still makes more sense to me than a 'pat' of butter. Win some lose some I guess
+1
level 38
Nov 30, 2018
Dazinho71: Is that because your butter come in a tub and when you scoop it out it looks like a knob? (Not being facetious, am genuinely inquiring)
+1
level 76
Jan 23, 2017
I heard it often in the US when I was growing up in the 1960s, but I don't hear it much anymore. Our school lunch menus would say, "Hot rolls with one pat of butter." They were small square slices cut from a stick of butter, but they varied in thickness depending on who cut them. Later we got small cardboard squares with a pat of butter on them, covered in waxed paper.
+1
level 67
Aug 23, 2018
Definitely in the US, at least.
+1
level 57
May 6, 2019
It comes from when butter was churned from milk. When it was turned out of the churn it was wet and it was patted around (bit like kneading clay or dough) with wooden paddles (not hands that could be hot and melt the butter) till the air and water were squeezed out. Then it would be patted into blocks or shapes. You can still buy butter moulds and stamps in different sizes to make little pats of butter as decorative presentations of your butter, for guests.
+1
level 77
Jan 23, 2017
Ginger?
+1
level 77
Jan 23, 2017
I guess that's not a bush.. what about Sherry as wine
+1
level 67
Jan 23, 2017
Sherry isn't distilled wine, rather fortified wine to which distillate (like brandy) has been added.
+1
level 76
Aug 26, 2017
Ginger is a root, those brown knobby things in the produce section.
+1
level 48
Jan 23, 2017
Well I missed my own name...
+2
level 62
Jan 23, 2017
Spud?
+2
level 67
Jan 24, 2017
I think 'Laurel' should also be a shrub used as a herb in cooking, its usually called a Bay leaf. Great if a leaf or two is in the boiling of corned beef.
+1
level 61
Jan 28, 2017
that's what I tried first. Probably because it's my sister's name.
+1
level 45
Jan 24, 2017
Kurt is also a way to spell Curt
+3
level 58
Jan 24, 2017
Yes, but not a way to spell "curt."
+1
level 42
Jan 25, 2017
My uncle was a Kurt
+1
level 42
Jan 25, 2017
Say nothing of Kurt Cobain
+1
level 41
Feb 13, 2017
another name for Honest/Blunt could be "Earnest."
+1
level 67
Aug 23, 2018
Nah, "earnest" means more like "sincere" or "genuinely believing," not so much "blunt." Besides, the name is spelled Ernest (my grandfather's name!)
+1
level 45
Dec 18, 2018
Could "Sherry" work for the distilled wine clue?
+1
level 57
May 6, 2019
I sherry is fortified but it is not distilled. Brandy is distilled wine.
+1
level 78
May 16, 2019
Hmm... to pry open. That could be Wedge. As in Red Two Wedge Antilles.
+1
level 52
Jun 22, 2019
"Morgan" is also used to refer to DNA segments, named after Thomas Hunt Morgan. I would say it is as much a "segment" as a gene is. https://isogg.org/wiki/CentiMorgan
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