General Knowledge Quiz #111

Answer these random trivia questions.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: February 9, 2020
First submittedDecember 5, 2014
Times taken42,632
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Question
Answer
What animal is generally considered to be the holiest animal in Hinduism?
Cow
According to Shakespeare, who was told to "beware the Ides of March"?
Julius Caesar
What's the capital of Switzerland?
Bern
What constellation has a "belt" of three bright stars?
Orion
In basketball, what word means "nothing but net"?
Swish
Besides Kazakh, what is an official language of Kazakhstan?
Russian
Besides coffee, what goes into an affogato?
Ice Cream
What is a book of the Bible, a girl's name, or a word that means "mercy"?
Ruth
What organization's traditions were "rum, sodomy, and the lash" - according to an
apocryphal Winston Churchill quote
The Royal Navy
What is the female version of a bar mitzvah?
Bat Mitzvah
In the Bible, Jesus raised three people from the dead. Who was the only one that had a name?
Lazarus
Double, double toil and trouble. What creature's eye do witches need for their broth?
Newt
What is the common English translation of Descartes' famous statement "Cogito Ergo Sum"?
I think, therefore I am
What was the last name of brothers Chico, Harpo, Groucho, Zeppo, and Gummo?
Marx
Which chemical element is prominently used in laptop batteries and antidepressant medication?
Lithium
What religious group renounces modern inventions, and also speaks "Pennsylvania Dutch"?
Amish
How is the word "jail" sometimes spelled in the United Kingdom?
Gaol
What series of video games takes place in the mythical land of Hyrule?
The Legend of Zelda
In the puppet show, who is Mr. Punch's wife?
Judy
Who starred as Arnold Schwarzenegger's twin in "Twins"?
Danny DeVito
+8
Level 83
Dec 7, 2014
Ruthless. Nice! Now I understand that word better.
+1
Level 71
Dec 8, 2014
AAAAhhhhhhh...cool
+3
Level 72
Jan 13, 2015
Mind = Blown
+1
Level 81
May 25, 2018
Whoa.
+1
Level 81
Feb 15, 2020
Something tells me a Germanic word origin, not a poetic twist on a Biblical name.
+1
Level 66
Dec 11, 2014
Never heard of the puppet show
+1
Level 61
Jan 13, 2017
It dates from 16th century Italy. Hard to believe you've never heard of something that's been around for 500 years.
+2
Level 46
Jun 5, 2017
I've never heard of it either. Maybe it's more well known in Europe.
+1
Level 67
Jan 6, 2019
I believe it is more a Uk thing, I ve only heard it since a few years (and only because I allways watch the english channel). We do have a puppet show that is, similar (jan klaasen) but it is not as big of a thing as it seems to be in the uk (allmost like a national cultural treasure)
+1
Level 78
Apr 26, 2020
I remember seeing a Punch and Judy show on American TV in the late 1950s or early '60s, but I don't remember on which show they appeared and I remember they seemed frightening to me. I agree, they weren't a big thing here. Most of what I know about them came from an episode of the British TV show, Midsomer Murder.
+1
Level 57
Jun 5, 2017
From an old nursery rhyme: Punch and Judy fought for a pie. Punch gave Judy a knock in the eye. Says Punch to Judy, "Will you have any more?" Says Judy to Punch, "My eye is sore."
+2
Level 76
Apr 18, 2019
It's not so popular anymore in the UK, given that it's basically domestic violence played for laughs :/
+4
Level 87
Jan 13, 2015
Arguably, all 3 people whom Jesus raised from the dead had names, even if we don't know the other two.
+2
Level 45
Jan 13, 2015
.....
+1
Level 79
Nov 29, 2015
Nope. You shouldn't believe everything anyone tells you.
+1
Level 54
May 19, 2017
If they didn't bother changing the names, how come the Roman version of Greek mythology where the name were changed is commonly known to be a variation on the same myth, while the Biblical myth is only doubted by a few rather off-the-rails individuals? The stories are nothing alike; the only similarity is the resurrection of Lazarus/Osiris, and even they are completely different (one mortal, the other immortal; one caused by a simple word, the other by reassembling a body in Frankenstein-esque fashion).
+2
Level 72
Jan 13, 2015
I have always thought it was pronounced Swoosh
+2
Level 63
Jan 13, 2015
Definitely put swoosh myself
+1
Level ∞
Jan 14, 2015
An extremely effective marketing campaign by Nike!
+1
Level 72
May 23, 2016
I put swoosh, too!
+1
Level 78
Jun 5, 2017
Another swoosher here, and when that didn't work I tried whoosh. Grrrr, b-ball is my downfall.
+2
Level 78
Apr 10, 2018
one more for swoosh. I thought swish was more of a drag thing.
+2
Level ∞
Feb 9, 2020
Swoosh is the name of the Nike logo. The correct word is swish.
+1
Level 72
Feb 21, 2020
Strangely, after Katy Perry’s “Swish Swish” video, I got it right away!
+1
Level 38
Feb 10, 2015
So much organized religion stuff :/
+2
Level 70
Apr 30, 2015
As opposed to disorganised religion stuff ?
+1
Level 83
Jun 6, 2017
There are 6 questions related to religion on this quiz. That's too much! Too much I tell ya!
+1
Level 67
Jan 6, 2019
I read fluff...
+1
Level 69
Jun 11, 2015
tried avocado for affogato, was surprised when it didn't work. Have never heard of the real answer, even though I spend more time at coffee shops then at home. learned something. cool.
+1
Level 29
Dec 10, 2015
Lithium is usually used to treat bipolar disorder, not depression. Just sayin.......
+1
Level 72
May 23, 2016
More to the point: lithium compounds are classified as mood stabilizers, not antidepressants.
+1
Level ∞
Feb 9, 2020
Lithium is also used to treat depression. Interestingly, there's lithium in most drinking water and there's evidence to suggest places with more lithium in the water have lower rates of suicide.
+1
Level 72
Feb 21, 2020
A pint of ice cream and a good night’s sleep can be used to treat depression (successfully!) too, but that doesn’t make them antidepressants. Lithium is also not an antidepressant.

There’s also the matter of using “prominently”: It’s definitely not used prominently for depression; it’s not even the recommended front-line bipolar treatment anymore (due to side effects). Altogether, pharmaceuticals only account for 4% of lithium use worldwide; it is much more often (more prominently?) used in industrial applications: ceramics and aluminum production, lubricants, air conditioners — in addition to batteries.

Might I so boldly suggest just “Which chemical element is commonly used in portable electronics batteries and medication to treat bipolar disorder?” (I suspect most people are getting the answer based on the batteries part anyway.)

+2
Level 71
Nov 7, 2016
Tried Mrs. Punch. :D
+2
Level 58
Jun 5, 2017
Mind went blank, couldn't remember the female equivalent of a bar mitzvah - all I could come up with was bar chutzpah!
+2
Level 77
Jun 5, 2017
I'm Pennsylvania Dutch on both sides of my family, and no one is Amish. Pennsylvania Dutch means someone of German heritage and one of various Protestant faiths who historically resided in Pennsylvania and would have known a dialect of German known as Pennsylvania Dutch or Pennsylvania German. There are far more Pennsylvania Dutch who are not Amish than who are. My relatives are Lutheran and Methodist. And, honestly, to suggest that all Amish renounce all modern inventions is also inaccurate; communities typically can collectively decide what technology, if any, to embrace. I'd reword to "What religious group often renounces modern inventions and are identified among the " 'Pennsylvania Dutch'?" or something along those lines.
+1
Level 78
Jun 5, 2017
Yep, I descend from Pennsylvania Dutch, and not one Amish among them.
+2
Level ∞
Jun 5, 2017
Changed to "speak Pennsylvania Dutch".
+1
Level 67
Jan 6, 2019
I allways thought Pennsylvania dutch was a/the language, so saying you are pennsylvania dutch because your parents are looks very weird to me (not saying you are wrong, just that it is news to me). And that yes there are groups that speak Pennsylvania dutch but arent amish. Also trivia; the "dutch" doesn't mean dutch. It has not much to do with it, it refers to the predecessor of dutch and german (diets or teutonic). I think a lot of people might think Pennsylvania dutch is a dutch "language/dialect" but it is german.
+1
Level 72
Feb 21, 2020
It’s perfectly normal and not at all weird to be Pennsylvania Dutch or of Pennsylvania Dutch descent/extraction/ancestry, and to refer to oneself as such. (I too, like some folks above, am Pennsylvania Dutch: my family is German, Lutheran and from Schuylkill County, PA.) Yes, it’s a language too, but how is it any different than being German and speaking German, being Russian and speaking Russian, etc.?
+1
Level 78
Apr 26, 2020
They weren't even Dutch. They were mostly Protestant Germans from the Rhineland Palatinate or Alsace Lorraine, who spoke a High German dialect. I'm guessing either people thought their language sounded like Dutch or they confused the spelling of Deutsch when giving them the label of Pennsylvania Dutch. They should be called Pennsylvania Germans.The Amish came from Swiss-German Anabaptist origins.
+1
Level 67
Jun 5, 2017
Please also accept bas mitzvah, as dictionary.com says it is a variation of bat mitzvah.
+1
Level 49
Jun 8, 2017
I'm glad I wasn't the only one who tried that.
+3
Level 60
Jun 9, 2017
We do not sometimes call jail "Gaol" in the UK. That is old english. Stopped using that in the 1800s
+6
Level 76
Mar 6, 2018
Speak for yourself, I almost always spell it that way.
+2
Level 76
Apr 18, 2019
Middle Earth isn't in the UK :P
+1
Level 73
Feb 10, 2020
Jail is much more common usage now, but gaol is still current in the UK (and I believe some other countries).
+2
Level 45
Jul 16, 2017
Only 36% got Zelda! How?!?
+1
Level 49
Mar 7, 2018
I missed it cause I tried about 40,000 different ingredients for the coffee question and ran out of time and didnt see the question.
+1
Level 83
Apr 26, 2020
I guess some people don't know their games very well.
+1
Level 56
Mar 7, 2018
I think you should say: "Besides coffee AND water, what goes into an affogato?" because I hardly think that any coffee drink would work without water. Water otherwise is (and should be) a perfectly acceptable answer.
+3
Level 81
May 25, 2018
So, because water is an ingredient in EVERY coffee drink, you think it's a good answer to the question, "What goes in an affogato?"?
+1
Level 50
Nov 16, 2019
Question should ask for an alternative spelling of jail. The spelling gaol is used outside the UK.
+1
Level 73
Feb 10, 2020
The translation is really from the French, in which Descartes wrote the original. "Je pense, donc je suis". The Latin version is better known, but it's a translation too.
+1
Level 67
Feb 15, 2020
He wrote it both in Latin and in French, but indeed the French version is earlier. The Latin one is not just a mere translation though, but a different book altogether.
+1
Level 60
Apr 26, 2020
The first time I came to Melbourne back in '89 I stayed in East Brunswick with some friends. Just down the road from us on Nicholson Street on the number 96 tram line, someone had graffitied 'Rum, Sodomy and the Lash' in huge letters on a green painted brick wall, so you saw it every time you caught the tram. I later learned that it is the name of a Pogues album, but only later did I learn of its connection to the British Navy.
+1
Level 38
Apr 27, 2020
Gives you an idea of this website's demographic when Mr Punch's wife is more guessed than Zelda.
+2
Level 29
Apr 27, 2020
Nobody uses gaol here anymore. In the uk we say jail or prison like normal people. They called it gaol in the Victorian times ( or so I learnt in school) but that word died out. I’ve never heard anyone say it and I’ve lived here all my life
+1
Level 46
Apr 27, 2020
Please stop using "facts" from the Bible as general knowledge
+1
Level 55
Jul 17, 2020
I have only seen 'gaol' once or twice, and always assumed it was an Americanism! I am sure the first time was in 'What Katy Did', so that might have been why
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