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German Loan Words Quiz

These German words have sneaked into the English language. See if you can guess them.
These words are not necessarily used the same way in German
Last updated: August 27, 2018
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Definition
Word
Fermented cabbage
Sauerkraut
Literally, lightning war
Blitzkrieg
Preschool for children aged 4-6
Kindergarten
Mischievous, noisy type of ghost
Poltergeist
Child prodigy
Wunderkind
The dots above this ü
Umlaut
Dog breed called a "wiener dog"
Dachshund
The spirit of the times
Zeitgeist
Hitler's job title
Führer
Definition
Word
Forbidden
Verboten
Pleasure from the misfortune of others
Schadenfreude
A person's double or look-alike
Doppelgänger
German for above, Deutschland ____ alles
Über
What you say when someone sneezes
Gesundheit
Politics based on pragmatism, not idealism
Realpolitik
Large beer mug
Stein
Musical instrument similar to a xylophone
Glockenspiel
Breaded meat cutlet
Schnitzel
+1
level ∞
Apr 30, 2013
Updated and expanded!
+5
level 28
Mar 6, 2018
Nice quiz, thank you! I'm German and have a few suggestions: I never heard the word "Stein" before I talked to native English speakers (German word would be "Maß(krug)". When I first read the word Dachshund (-hound) somewhere I had to look it up in a dictionary because I had no clue what kind of dog this might be (in Germany we call the breed "Dackel").
+1
level 21
Apr 15, 2018
Ich hab genau den gleichen Gedankengang gehabt. :-D
+2
level 66
Nov 23, 2018
Alternatively, mug of beer could also be "Humpen". Interestingly, "Stein" seems to be a German word used in the English language for that definition, but not in German. To be fair, in Germany we also have an English borrow word like that: "Handy"! (German for "cell phone")
+1
level 27
Dec 4, 2018
I'm German too and I've never heard some of this.
+1
level 52
Dec 5, 2018
I am totally grasping at straws in response to you native Germans. Though, I believe the issue is that these words were "borrowed" and interpreted a long time ago. Where, Germany has several differing dialects, etc. I mean, 150 years ago, you all were completely separate principalities and differed, somewhat, immensely. Just my two cents, however. Please don't take it as the hard truth. I am just a history buff and no where near a native German. Had a German girlfriend in my 20s and only traveled from Frankfurt (am Main) to Landstuhl/Ramstein a few times for work. These do not qualify for much of anything.
+1
level 43
Feb 16, 2019
Same thoughts here, especially with Dachshund. Typed in Dackel without success.
+3
level 8
May 2, 2013
sehr gut!
+2
level 40
May 18, 2013
Mien got in heimel. I knew these. If I could spell I'd be a... wunderkind.
+1
level 70
Sep 3, 2016
Du bist hässlich und deine mutter kleider sie komischer. :-) Sorry, that's all I've got.
+3
level 64
Apr 22, 2017
Ich bin ein Berliner.
+1
level 45
Oct 14, 2017
My God in Heaven! Thus spoke Zarathustra! Whereof one can not speak, there of one must remain silent.
+1
level 38
Jun 27, 2018
Den namen Gottes misbrauchen1
+2
level 26
Jun 22, 2013
I wish I could spell...
+1
level 35
Jul 17, 2013
I've never heard the word gesundheit actually said in everyday life. I saw it on a programme once, but other than that I'm pretty sure the majority of people say bless you. Gesundheit seems to be a bit vague.
+1
level 55
Apr 27, 2015
I have always said "gesundheind."
+1
level 62
Oct 26, 2013
Please change Stein - because this is not a beermug - its a stone. Never heard that as a word for mug and I am german.
+1
level 17
Dec 13, 2013
First i tried Bierstien and then I tried beerstein, I was quite annoyed those didn't work.
+2
level 65
May 28, 2014
In the US we call beer mugs stein - and these are German words in English so it makes sense to me.
+1
level 56
Apr 29, 2015
Correct, "Stein" is (mostly in the western and south western part) a common word for a mug with 1 liter. I know it, as I live there...
+1
level 41
Oct 20, 2015
We used Stein in both the UK and NZ :) oh and at beerfest lol
+1
level 59
Mar 21, 2014
A, E, I, O, U, Ä, Ö and Ü are Umlaute. The dots above are called Umlautpunkte e.g. There are some other names for them too. I also don't understand the "German for above" part. "Deutschland über alles" probably refers to the National Anthem as it's a line but it actually means "Germany above all". Is "German for above" a thing? I mean I don't see a connection there. Never heard of a Stein either but that's probably cause it depends on the region you're at how that mug is called. To me it looks like a Bembel, which is a mug for applewine though.
+1
level 38
May 9, 2014
"German for above" means the German word for "above". über = above
+1
level 74
Aug 28, 2014
"Germany for above" is a rahter awkward translation imo. I'd say "Germany above all" is more accurate.(and actually makes sense)
+1
level 64
Oct 20, 2015
@tielenhei87 "German for above" is not a translation. It's the clue for this word. To be more understandable maybe it should be written like "German for above."
+1
level 59
Jan 19, 2016
Ah, I get it now. Yeah it should be written like this to make it clear.
+2
level 46
May 4, 2015
To be accurate, only Ä, Ö, Ü are Umlaute, A, E, I, O, U are plain and simple Vokale. And Umlaut still is a German word in English, even if the meaning slightly shifted.
+4
level 76
May 20, 2014
You mentioned the war once, but I think you got away with it. So, that's two egg mayonnaise, a prawn Goebbels, a Hermann Goering, and four Colditz salads.
+1
level 65
May 28, 2014
Can you please accept some other spellings for Daschund? <-- This spelling is used elsewhere on this site.
+1
level 63
Jun 9, 2014
"Snuck".
+1
level 44
Jul 31, 2014
that
+1
level ∞
Jul 7, 2015
Snuck is a classic mistake. My spellchecker is highlighting it right now. Sneaked is the correct form.

Admission: snuck sounds better to me

+1
level 61
Jul 20, 2018
Let's be real about this, Quizmaster - it's not that Sneaked is the 'correct' form. It's just that it WAS the correct and only form from around the 1500s. For the last 100-150 or so years, Snuck has been an accepted variant. This is simply a matter of BrE vs AmE.
+1
level 42
Jul 16, 2014
Great quiz!
+1
level 78
Oct 25, 2014
You should accept Berliner for the pastry question..."Ich bin ein Berliner!" (I am, of course, just kidding!)
+1
level 57
Nov 21, 2014
I see people debating Stein....isnt this a viking word??? my grandfather spoke fluent german along with his native language, czech. He never taught me that beer mug was stein??? The rest was fun though...and easy because of my background :)
+1
level 67
Mar 16, 2015
If you are going to accept the +e convention for Führer/Fuehrer, which is perfectly normal and acceptable in German (albeit a bit old-fashioned), please also accept it for Doppelgänger/Doppelgaenger and über/ueber. Für die Deutschen, die sich über die Bedeutung des Wortes „Stein" klagen, in den Vereinigten Staaten sagt man „Stein" als Kurzung des Wortes „Steinkrug". Ein Maß ist immer aus Glas gemacht. Ein Stein(krug) ist ein Humpen, der aus Steinzeug gemacht ist.
+1
level 42
May 4, 2015
Fun quiz. Thanks.
+1
level 74
Oct 22, 2015
Tried daschund, dashchund, dashund. No leeway at all on that spelling?
+1
level 45
Mar 30, 2016
No, because Dachshund means badger dog. Dachs = badger, Hund = Dog. Accepting more spellings doesn't make any sense.
+1
level 70
Jun 2, 2016
I could never quite get all the letters in the right order, not to mention that I kept adding a "t". I kept want it to be datschund or daschund. Close, but no weiner dog. 🐩
+1
level 59
Jan 28, 2016
Never heard a German call a "wiener dog" Dachshund. Though it is a word for that dog breed, they're commonly called Dackel.
+1
level 49
Apr 19, 2016
Regardless of its use in the expression 'Deutchland uber alles', the word 'uber' has, as the intro of the quiz makes explicit, 'sneaked (sic) into' the English language.
+1
level 70
Apr 28, 2016
I'm thinking gesundheit must be an American thing, I'm guessing upper midwest. I have never encountered it in Australian, NZ or UK English.
+1
level 67
Feb 17, 2017
I am in Australia and I often hear it said when someone sneezes. I have also heard it said in England. I don't know from where it came into expressions originally, but probably in movies somewhere along the line.
+1
level 39
Jun 5, 2016
I always assumed that "realpolitik" was Russian.
+1
level 58
Jun 14, 2016
It's most associated with Bismarck.
+1
level 33
Jun 8, 2016
Good quiz. Tricky words to spell, too. Thanks for allowing so many variations! :)
+1
level 61
Aug 15, 2016
Could you include Beerstein/Bierstein?
+1
level 50
Dec 21, 2016
What the hell is a "wiener dog"??? A dog from Vienna? A sausage in a bun? I am from Germany and I didn't get it. Still don't. Maybe it is an expression in Austrian (German)? If so, you should specify that. If it says that the words are from the German language, one would assume that you mean Hochdeutsch.
+1
level 68
Jan 25, 2017
What is so hard to get about it? It's simply the english word for Dackel or Dachshund, both very Standard German words.
+1
level 67
Feb 17, 2017
I have heard the expression 'Sausage Dog' a thousand times but never 'Weiner Dog'......... I think it is a case of double translation mix-up.
+1
level 66
Sep 29, 2017
You never heard of "weiner dog"? What country are you from? Very common in the USA.
+1
level 66
Sep 29, 2017
That's because most Americans, like me, can't spell dachshund......lol
+1
level 30
Feb 27, 2017
german words are fun to say
+1
level 71
Mar 12, 2017
Dachshund, which means "Badger Dog" if translated word for word is only used in English, not in German. The German word for Dachshund is "Dackel".
+1
level 66
Sep 29, 2017
Got 7. Spent all my time trying to spell dachshund.
+1
level 47
Dec 10, 2017
a Schnitzel isn't always breaded, only a Vienna/Wiener Schnitzel is without exception, but, for example, a Zigeunerschnitzel isn't usually breaded.
+1
level 64
Feb 24, 2018
I know that a beer mug is referred to as a "Stein" in English (though I couldn't think of it in the quiz), but we don't call it that in German. It's known as a Krug, a Bierkrug or a Steinkrug. The latter is probably what the english word derives from.
+1
level 58
Apr 27, 2018
Six attempts to spell "gesundheit" correctly...
+1
level 2
Jun 20, 2018
English native speakers are accustomed to words in English being sometimes spelt oddly or strangely; but never for any apparent reason, or with any pattern. Whereas, words in German are all spelt completely consistently and regularly according to well-defined spelling rules. You only have to learn what those spelling rules are.
+1
level 52
Sep 26, 2018
too many long words for this hunt-and-peck typist...
+1
level 27
Dec 4, 2018
I know right? It's impossible to find everything. I actually can type, but I'm doing it in the dark. :l
+1
level 45
Dec 7, 2018
Missed dachshund... knew it ended in hund, but couldnt remember, so tried schweinhund... not correct as expected.. Edit:ow yea also didnt get realpolitik. Never heard of it (and sounds more english than german to me, besides the k at the end ofcourse)
+1
level 45
Jan 13, 2019
only missed realpolitik this time around. And glockenspiel sort of means the same as "family jewels" here...