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Google What's the Difference? #2

Fill the blanks in these Google autocompletes that start with "What's the difference between".
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Last updated: August 28, 2017
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What's the difference between ...
Deficit and Debt
Convex and Concave
a Vegetarian and a Vegan
Burma and Myanmar
Zeus and Jupiter
a Geek and a Nerd
a Zeppelin and a Blimp
Jail and Prison
a Fiddle and a Violin
What's the difference between ...
Discreet and Discrete
a Footnote and an Endnote
a College and a University
a Pixie and a Fairy
Halal and Kosher
a Sousaphone and a Tuba
New Delhi and Delhi
a Chef and a Cook
Sleet and Hail
What's the difference between ...
Grey and Gray
Anorexia and Bulimia
Poetry and Prose
a Pram and a Stroller
a Hypothesis and a Theory
Pilates and Yoga
Lava and Magma
a Planet and a Star
an Ellipse and an Oval
+16
level 76
May 22, 2014
What's the difference between a planet and a star?? Wow.
+11
level 44
May 30, 2014
I know. I was very disappointed when I tried that and it worked.
+9
level 58
May 31, 2014
Well, if you are 7-years-old, you might have that question. And 7-year-olds have been known to google stuff. So let us hope thousands of 2nd graders have been wondering about this very thing.
+2
level 70
Jun 5, 2014
Hard to believe but many educated adults don't know the difference. I recently had a conversation with two friends, both college graduates, and neither had a clue!
+2
level 67
Feb 26, 2015
On a cruise Trivia quiz the question was asked "Is the Sun a planet or a star?" Quite a few put planet!......... never assume a fact to be known by everyone.
+10
level 76
Sep 1, 2015
In the context of looking up at the sky and trying to identify if any given light you see is a star or a planet, I could see it as a legitimate question.
+1
level 70
Aug 31, 2017
Only if you're looking from, like, Pluto
+1
level 54
Jan 2, 2018
"Only if you're looking from, like, Pluto" What!?
+6
level 60
May 9, 2017
I don't understand why so many are so surprised by that answer. I'm sure most people can tell apart a star from a planet nowadays thanks to brilliant people that lived before us but can you explain exactly what defines a star and a planet? I learned the names of the then nine planets in school but that's as deep as it got. Everything I know beyond that is self taught because it interests me. And I mean our sun is often put next to the planets of our solar system for comparison of size and it doesn't look different from them in those kind of graphics.
+1
level 73
Aug 29, 2017
ok smart guy...what IS the difference between a planet and a star?
+4
level 70
Sep 5, 2017
What a rude reply to a very balanced, rational post by Carry. Who peed in your coffee, Buck?
+2
level 59
Jan 2, 2018
I had the same reaction. First I thought "How could anyone not know the difference?" But then I thought about whether I could *articulate* the difference intelligently...stars are balls of gas containing hydrogen, helium, iron, etc. that react with each other to create light and heat. They live for millions of years and go through phases (giant, nova, etc.), and are much larger than planets. But...what classifies something as a star vs. a planet, exactly? Size? Chemical composition? Jupiter's composition is nothing like Earth's. It's gaseous, like stars are. It's much bigger than Earth, like stars are. Maybe the difference is orbit? Stars orbit the galaxy itself rather than a particular star (eg., the Sun, around which all our planets revolve). The difference is probably how much heat is produced and the qualities of the reactions of the elements. Honestly, I don't think the question is as silly as it seems at first blush if you compare the Jovian planets to stars.
+3
level 64
Jan 2, 2018
The most fundamental difference is that stars undergo hydrogen fusion, creating helium and releasing enormous amounts of energy, largely in the form of light and heat. Think about it: the Sun makes the day, well, day, while Jupiter is not even the brightest object in the night sky. Also, I think it's good for people to google concepts they don't understand, however obvious it may be, for it shows that they have the desire to remediate the gaps in their knowledge.
+1
level 64
Jan 2, 2018
Also, I have to wonder what the raw number for each of these searches are. I'd wager more people google "what is the difference between discreet and discrete" (honestly I sometimes confuse them) than between a planet and a star. Similarly, I can't think of any other object the general public (meaning those who need to google this) would need to differentiate from a star besides a planet. So if relatively few people google it, it could still create a trend causing google to make that a suggestion.
+1
level 72
Dec 19, 2018
And to muddy the waters further you have other 'stars' like neutron stars and pulsars. Are they still stars and if so how do they effect the definition of what a star is and what differentiates them from planets?

I thought briefly that the definition might be more to do with what orbits what - maybe stars orbit the centre of a galaxy whereas planets orbit stars. But that's not always true - what about binary star systems and rogue planets? And anyway, stars and their accompanying planets orbit a point in space which is only nearer to the star because of the greater mass.

Maybe it's not so obvious after all
+4
level 75
May 29, 2014
Got all of these except discrete and pram... took me a second to come up with star, though. Who really doesn't know the difference between a planet and a star? I would have thought planetoid, moon, asteroid, dwarf planet... something along those lines.
+3
level 69
May 29, 2014
I think with planet and star they are talking about how they look in the night sky because that is the only situation in which the difference would be hard to tell.
+1
level 75
May 9, 2019
I guess that makes sense. I remember being taught as a child to spot the difference by observing that stars "twinkle" and planets don't.
+3
level 37
May 29, 2014
most likely it is for observation. It's hard to tell with the naked eye unless you know what to look for.
+3
level 46
May 29, 2014
Or at least I hope it's for observation -.-
+2
level 44
May 30, 2014
To retain SOME hope for humanity... I'll go with that.
+2
level 64
Jul 20, 2014
Planets buy Stars' old clothes to hang on the wall so they can charge you more for fried mozzarella.
+4
level 68
Jan 2, 2018
You're all looking at this the wrong way. The underlying premise of the question is that the people asking it already KNOW that there is a difference between a star and a planet and want to know how that difference is defined. Not so stupid a question at all.
+1
level 78
Jan 2, 2018
There's an important difference between "I know that Jupiter is a planet and the Sun is a star." and "I know WHY Jupiter is considered a planet, but the Sun is considered a star."
+2
level 80
May 29, 2014
This was mostly easy except that I missed pram and vitamin. Vitamin partly because I didn't know the English word to use. New Delhi took a while and also Sleet because I spelled the answer wrong first. Nice quiz!

Google is used by all ages, I'd imagine some younger students googling for planet vs. stars? You gotta learn at some time.
+3
level 72
Jan 2, 2018
Since vitamin is no longer in the quiz, I'd be intrigued to know what the "English for vitamin" originally was. The only difference I know is that we pronounce it correctly ;-)
+3
level 67
Jan 2, 2018
probably mineral. or as the British say, mineral.
+1
level 49
May 29, 2014
Could not spell bulimia!
+1
level 50
May 29, 2014
How about allowing pushchair which is a stroller?
+4
level 56
May 29, 2014
Allowing variations ruins the whole idea of this quiz, doesn't it?
+2
level 72
Jan 2, 2018
Interesting thought ... when the words are synonyms, I'd agree with hannina. When they're merely similar words, I'd hope for some leeway in accepting regional variations of what is essentially the same thing, just in a different part of the world.
+1
level 67
Sep 1, 2015
Here in South Australia the common use is 'Pusher'
+1
level 75
Jan 3, 2018
In my part of the US a pusher is a drug dealer.
+1
level 72
Dec 19, 2018
Maybe pram is also a name for a drug dealer in Oz...
+1
level 74
Jan 2, 2018
I tried pushchair and buggy, never heard anyone say stroller.
+1
level 58
Jan 2, 2018
I agree - they are never called strollers in UK. Pushchair should be allowed.
+1
level 59
Jan 2, 2018
But the quiz is asking very specifically for which search result Google auto-completes with. The fact that "pushchair" is a valid term for the object is irrelevant. The only correct answer is whatever comes up first in Google.
+1
level 75
Jan 2, 2018
I tried carriage first before thinking of stroller, but stroller is the correct answer because that's what people most commonly type in. Some dialects of English are not as commonly used as others.
+2
level 10
May 29, 2014
These quizzes are fantastic!
+2
level 61
May 29, 2014
I never would have guessed star. I tried guessing dwarf planet.
+1
level 35
Jun 2, 2014
I think I tried everything but star. Moon, sun, asteroid, galaxy, dwarf.
+1
level 35
Jun 6, 2014
It's sad. You don't have to know the difference. just know another word for it
+1
level 50
Jun 14, 2014
Damn I said theorem instead of theory -_-
+3
level 43
Jul 9, 2014
As someone who has had both bulimia and anorexia, I feel the need to point out that there happens to be extreme differences. I know these aren't self-created results and are commonly searched on Google, but I just had to say that.
+1
level 72
Dec 19, 2018
So you should be pleased that people have been trying to find out what the differences are
+1
level 50
Jul 25, 2014
3:10 left.
+1
level 27
Nov 8, 2014
(I know it's cheating) You can just open up google and type in 'what's the difference between x and y'.
+2
level 67
Sep 1, 2015
Surely there would be no point in doing quizzes if you cheat for the answers, the best part of Jet-Punk I think, is testing ones knowledge and then learning from your mistakes and increasing ones knowledge. The only person a 'Cheat' cheats is themselves.
+1
level 24
Jul 25, 2016
I thought moon instead of star... I think it makes more sense... couldn't you mistake a moon for a planet? I think that this should be accepted
+2
level 60
May 9, 2017
I guess Quizmaster used the first result he got on Google when typing in "What's the difference between a planet and a ...".
+1
level 24
Jul 25, 2016
What's the difference between a hypothesis and a guess?
+1
level 70
Oct 11, 2017
A hypothesis is an idea you have first, and then you design tests to see if it is true or not. A guess is when you already have a question of fact before you, and you make a judgement without testing.
+1
level 39
Aug 29, 2017
Got them all, but I'm disappointed that 'discreet' took a while.
+1
level 30
Aug 29, 2017
What's a stroller?
+2
level 64
Jan 2, 2018
A pram.
+1
level 72
Jan 2, 2018
I thought a stroller was a pushchair (where the child sits up), and the pram is where the baby lies down (like a small cot on wheels)
+1
level 43
Feb 14, 2019
A stroller is both, I feel.
+1
level 58
Aug 29, 2017
What's a dirigible?
+1
level 78
Jan 2, 2018
An airship.
+1
level 45
Dec 31, 2017
Maybe you can accept Iupiter.The latin word is with an i
+1
level 68
Jan 2, 2018
Read "pilates" as "pirates" and figured my problem was spelling "bucaneers".
+1
level 68
Jan 2, 2018
See, I still got it wrong (2 c's),
+1
level 45
Jan 2, 2018
tough....thought it was written Greek instead of geek
+1
level 32
Jan 5, 2018
Yeah me too
+1
level 28
Jan 2, 2018
Can you accept more answers for Stroller? i live in the UK and never once has heard someone say stroller. We say Buggie.
+2
level 57
Jan 2, 2018
Regarding the issue of the pram question: Google UK lists 'buggy' as the top suggestion, ahead of 'stroller'. Google must have different suggestions for their localised sites to reflect the dialect(s) and searches in different countries. I personally haven't heard of the phrase 'stroller' before - only 'buggy' or 'pushchair'. It may be worth allowing additional answers that are the top suggestions in Australia, Canada and the UK, with the US version as the 'main' answer, especially where the top suggestion isn't used in at least one of those countries.
+1
level 47
Mar 31, 2019
Agreed. (While im not from any of the above countries, but i guess i get more of my english from the british english than the americsn)
+1
level 38
Jan 4, 2018
Fun Quiz!!
+2
level 32
Jan 5, 2018
I misread Geek as Greek...
+1
level 40
Feb 10, 2018
Me too lol
+1
level 76
Feb 25, 2018
I'm presuming that none of those who googled the prose/poetry one ever really got an answer.
+1
level 77
Apr 2, 2018
I'm just wondering... Is it normal to say "a university" or should it be "an"? It may be my limited English, but I didn't try university because I thought the word should begin with a consonant...
+1
level 72
Dec 27, 2018
This guide uses university in one of its examples https://www.englishclub.com/pronunciation/a-an.htm
+1
level 75
May 9, 2019
"a university" as the first sound in university is a "y" or /j/ sound. There is some disagreement about whether to use "a" or "an" before certain words that begin with "h" like "history," mostly by people who don't pronounce the "h" sound, like the British.
+1
level 72
May 15, 2019
We do pronounce the h in history...

Those of us who speak "properly" anyway